THE CAUCASUS


February 2008

Compiled by Bibliography Branch
Muir S. Fairchild Research Information Center
Maxwell AFB, AL


Contents

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Some materials listed below require access to subscription databases.  If you cannot gain access, contact your local library for availability.  AU students and faculty can contact the Center's Web Maintainer for a password.

All sites listed were last accessed on February 29, 2008.


Caucasus Region


Internet Resources

Caucasus Initiative.  Washington, Center for Strategic and International Studies.
Available online at:  http://www.csis.org/ruseura/caucasus/
Focuses on the three countries of the southern Caucasus:  Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia.  Situated between Russia, Turkey, and Iran, and astride transit routes for Caspian hydrocarbons and trade routes between Europe and Central Asia, these states occupy an increasingly important geographical and geostrategic position.

Caucasus Publications.  Shrivenham, England, Conflict Studies Research Centre, Defence Academy of the United Kingdom.
Available online at:  http://www.da.mod.uk/colleges/csrc/document-listings/caucasus/
CSRC experts use unclassified sources to "monitor and engage with political, social, economic and military thinking in the region via both formal and informal channels" and analyze the risks and likely nature of conflict.

Central Asia - Caucasus Institute Silk Road Studies Program.  
Available online at:  http://www.silkroadstudies.org/new/
The Central Asia-Caucasus Institute & Silk Road Studies Program form a joint transatlantic research and policy center.  The Joint Center has offices in Washington and Stockholm, and is affiliated with the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies of Johns Hopkins University and the Institute for Security and Development Policy.  Site includes access to two online periodicals:  China and Eurasia Forum Quarterly and Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst.

Chechnya and North Caucasus.  Washington, Center for Strategic and International Studies.
Available online at:  http://www.csis.org/hrs/chechnya
Includes links to commentaries and publications.

Chechnya Insurgency, compiled by Diana Simpson.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air University Library, December 2005.  23 p.  (Air University Library bibliography).
Available online at:  http://www.au.af.mil/au/aul/bibs/chech.htm

Chechnya Weekly:  News and Analysis on the North Caucasus.  Washington, Jamestown Foundation.
Available online at:  http://www.jamestown.org/chechnya_weekly/
This publication's mission is to inform policymakers, the media, and the public of developments in Chechnya, discuss the origins of the conflict and explore the possibilities for peace.

de Waal, Thomas and Mateeva, Anna.  Central Asia and the Caucasus:  A Vulnerable Crescent.  New York, International Peace Academy, February 2007.  19 p.
Available online at:  http://www.ipacademy.org/asset/file/142/IPA_P-RPT-CENTRAL_ASIA_Final.pdf

Dunlop, John.  Putin, Kozak, and Russian Policy toward the North Caucasus.  Washington, Jamestown Foundation, September 2006.  15 p.
http://jamestown.org/docs/Dunlop-14Sep06.pdf

Eurasia Daily Monitor.  Washington, Jamestown Foundation.
Available online at:  http://www.jamestown.org/edm/
Surveys recent developments in Eurasia, placing them in a geo-strategic perspective and outlining their implications for the United States and the West.

EurasiaNet.org
Available online at:  http://www.eurasianet.org/
Provides information and analysis about political, economic, environmental and social developments in the countries of Central Asia and the Caucasus, as well as in Russia, the Middle East, and Southwest Asia.  Operated by the Central Eurasia Project of the Open Society Institute.

Gorst, Isabel.  Foreign Investment:  Caucasus Is Scene of New Chapter in the Great Game  Financial Times (London) p. 4, October 31, 2007.
Available online at:  http://us.ft.com/ftgateway/superpage.ft?news_id=fto103120070219501167

Kaloudis, Stergos.  The Institutional Design of Russian Federalism:  A Comparative Study of Three Republics; Tatarstan, Dagestan, and Chechnya.  Demokratizatsiya 15:139-151 Winter 2007.
Available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=25049656&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Marek, Larry T.  The Caspian Sea Pipeline:  A Clear Strategic U.S. Interest.  Carlisle Barracks, PA, Army War College, May 2007.  33 p.
Available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA471547
Describes the challenges the countries in the Caspian Sea region face in their pursuit of energy, and proposes recommendations regarding how U.S. interests can be achieved in the Caspian region, and how the United States can serve as a stabilizing force.

McGregor, Andrew.  Military Jama'ats in the North Caucasus:  A Continuing Threat.  Washington, Jamestown Foundation, September 2006.  19 p.
Available online at:  http://jamestown.org/docs/McGregor-14Sep06.pdf
The last few years have seen a concerted effort by the pro-independence Chechen leadership to consolidate scattered Islamic resistance movements across the North Caucasus.  These locally based jama’ats (Islamic communities) champion a Salafist approach to Islam, a regional moral revival, and a steadfast opposition to Russian ‘colonialism’.  In many ways these groups are Islamic inheritors of an earlier (and largely secular) pan-Caucasian movement.

Melvin, Neil J.  Building Stability in the North Caucasus:  Ways Forward for Russia and the European Union.  Stockholm, Sweden, Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, May 2007.  59 p.  (SIPRI Policy Paper, No. 16).
Available online at:  http://books.sipri.org/product_info?c_product_id=337

Military Policy Awareness Link:  Russia.  Washington, National Defense University, Military Education Research Library Network (MERLN), 2007.
Available online at:  http://merln.ndu.edu/index.cfm?secID=112&pageID=3&type=section
See the Chechnya and the Caucasus link in the table of contents.  Provides links to resources including governmental and non-governmental sources.

Mitchell, Shenequa.  Unresolved Ethnic Conflict and Religious Revival in Russia:  The Chechen Element.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, December 2007.  83 p.
Available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA475771  

Nuriyev, Elkhan.  EU Policy in the South Caucasus:  A View from Azerbaijan.  Centre for European Policy Studies, July 2007.  27 p.  (CEPS Working Document, No. 272).
Available online at:  http://www.ciaonet.org/wps/ceps10087/ceps10087.pdf

Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty.  Crisis in Chechnya.  July 25, 2006.
Available online at:  http://www.rferl.org/specials/chechnya/
Provides brief history and numerous archived articles.

Radio Liberty/Radio Free Europe.  Caucasus Report
Available online at:  http://www.rferl.org/reports/
A weekly review of RFE/RL reporting and analysis about the countries of the South Caucasus and Russia's North Caucasus region. Site includes an archive of older articles.

Roschin, Mikhail.  Islam in the Northern Caucasus:  Dagestan.  Washington, Jamestown Foundation, September 2006.  16 p.
Available online at:  http://jamestown.org/docs/Roschin-14Sep06.pdf

Sabonis-Helf, Theresa.  The Unified Energy Systems of Russia (RAO-UES) in Central Asia and the Caucasus:  Nets of Interdependence.  Demokratizatsiya 15:429-444 Fall 2007.
Available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=27718360&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv
Most Central Asian and Caucasus countries have, to some extent, transformed and privatized their electricity sectors.  In recent years, Unified Energy Systems of Russia (RAO-UES) has purchased much of the generation and transmission assets that were made available.  Author explores how RAO-UES became the most important foreign investor, even in states that have problematic relations with Moscow, the advantages and disadvantages of RAO-UES participation for the successor states, and the energy security implications of the grid as it now exists for these southern states.

Shahnazaryan, David.  The South Caucasus:  Problems of Stability and Regional Security.  Demokratizatsiya 14:355-360  Summer 2006.  Available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=22546277&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Weir, Fred.  Rising Violence in Russia's Ingushetia.  Christian Science Monitor, p 6, September 14, 2007.
Available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1335333741&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD


Books

Baumann, R. F.  Russian-Soviet Unconventional Wars in the Caucasus, Central Asia and Afghanistan.  Stirling, VA, Military Press, 2001.  112 p.
Book call no.:  947.08 B347r 2001

Blandy, C. W.  Dagestan:  Birth of Presidential Republic.  Watchfield, Swindon, Conflict Studies Research Centre, Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, 2006.  20 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.defac.ac.uk/colleges/csrc/document-listings/caucasus/06(25)CWB.pdf
Book call no.:  947.52 B642da

Blandy, C. W.  Municipal Reform in the North Caucasus:  A Time Bomb in the Making.  Watchfield, Swindon, Conflict Studies Research Centre, Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, March 2007.  11 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.defac.ac.uk/colleges/csrc/document-listings/caucasus/07%2807%29CWB.pdf
Book call no.:  333.314752 B642m

Blandy, C. W.  North Caucasus:  On the Brink of Far-Reaching Destabilisation.  Camberley, Surrey, Conflict Studies Research Centre, Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, August 2005.  17 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.da.mod.uk/CSRC/documents/Caucasus/05%2836%29-CWB.pdf
Book call no.:  947.52086 B642n

Blandy, C. W.  North Caucasus:  Problems of Helicopter Support in Mountains.  Watchfield, Swindon, Conflict Studies Research Centre, Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, 2007.  22 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.da.mod.uk/colleges/csrc/document-listings/caucasus/07%2824%29CWB.pdf
Book call no.:  947.52086 B642na

Blandy, C. W.  "Whither Ingushetia?"  Watchfield, Swindon, Conflict Studies Research Centre, Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, 2006.  20 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.defac.ac.uk/colleges/csrc/document-listings/caucasus/03(06)CWB.pdf
Book call no.:  947.94792 B642w

Blank, Stephen.  After Two Wars:  Reflections on the American Strategic Revolution in Central Asia.  Carlisle Barracks, PA, Strategic Studies Institute, Army War College, 2006.  61 p.
U. S. military access to Central Asia and the Caucasus is a long-standing fact, but it is desirable as well for the future.  Author explains why this is necessary and how the US might ensure continued access.
Also available online at:  http://www.carlisle.army.mil/ssi/pdffiles/PUB614.pdf
Book call no.:  355.033573 B642a

Conflict, Cleavage, and Change in Central Asia and the Caucasus, edited by Karen Dawisha and Bruce Parrott.  New York, Cambridge University Press, 1997.  423 p.
Book call no.:  320.958 C748

Contrasts and Solutions in the Caucasus, edited by Ole Hriris and Sefa Martin Yurukel.  Oakville, CT, Aarhus University Press, 1998.  491 p.
Book call no.:  947.52 C764

Cornell, Svante E.  Georgia after the Rose Revolution:  Geopolitical Predicament and Implications for U. S. Policy.  Carlisle, PA, Strategic Studies Institute, Army War College, 2007.  41 p.
The attacks on New York and Washington on September 11, 2001, enhanced the importance of both the Transcaucasus and Central Asia to American security.  Overflight rights through the Caucasus to Central Asia and Afghanistan are vital components of the ongoing military effort there by both U.S. and NATO forces.  But this region has multiple conflicts and fault-lines.  As multiple recent crises show, Russo-Georgian tensions connected with South Ossetia and Abkhazia could erupt into open violence at any time.  The author outlines the possibilities for conflict in this region and the qualities that make it strategically important, not only for Washington and Moscow, but also increasingly for Europe.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA464082
Book call no.:  327.4758 C814g

Curtis, Glenn E.  Involvement of Russian Organized Crime Syndicates, Criminal Elements in the Russian Military, and Regional Terrorist Groups in Narcotics Trafficking in Central Asia, the Caucasus, and Chechnya.  Washington, Federal Research Division, Library of Congress, October 2002.  36 p.
Describes the current status of narcotics trafficking in four countries of Central Asia (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan), in the three former Soviet republics of the south Caucasus (Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia), and in Chechnya.  Reveals the role of Russian organized crime and Central Asian terrorist organizations.
Also available online at:  http://www.loc.gov/rr/frd/pdf-files/RussianOrgCrime.pdf
Book call no.:  364.1060947 C978i

Eurasia in Balance:  The US and the Regional Power Shift, edited by Ariel Cohen.  Burlington, VT, Ashgate, 2005.  214 p.
Security Threats and Challenges in the Caucasus after 9-11, by Svante E. Cornell, pp 43-68.
Book call no.:  355.033058 E89

Flashpoints in the War on Terrorism, edited by Derek S. Reveron and Jeffrey Stevenson Murer.  New York, Routledge, 2006.  357 p.
Chapter 5:  Caucasus, by Jeffrey Stevenson Murer, pp 87-114. 
Book call no.:  363.32511 F585

Gammer, Moshe.  The Lone Wolf and the Bear:  Three Centuries of Chechen Defiance of Russian Rule.  Pittsburgh, PA, University of Pittsburgh Press, 2006.  252 p.
Book call no.:  947.52 G193L

Globalization and Conflict:  National Security in a "New" Strategic Era, edited by Robert G. Patman.  New York, Routledge, 2006.  266 p.
Chapter 8:  Globalization and the "New Wars":  The Case of Chechnya, by Jim Headley, pp 151-167. 
Book call no.:  355.033 G5621

Hahn, Gordon M.  Russia's Islamic Threat.  New Haven, CT, Yale University Press, 2007.  349 p.
The North Caucasus jihad may be the harbinger of a much larger Muslim challenge to Russia’s political stability and state integrity.  The author outlines an already sophisticated and effective Chechen jihadist network that is expanding the territorial scope of its operations with inspiration and some assistance from the global jihadist movement.  Given its proximity to large stockpiles of diverse weapons, the expanding population of Russian-based Islamist terrorists is particular cause for alarm.
Book call no.:  363.3250947 H148r

Jafalian, Annie.  Influences in the South Caucasus:  Opposition & Convergence in Axes of Cooperation.  [Camberley, Surrey], Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, Conflict Studies Research Centre, 2004.  10 p.
In terms of foreign policy, the priorities set up by the leaders of the South Caucasian republics are often represented as dividing the region into two directions.  The North-South axis is the one linking Armenia with Russia and Iran, while the East-West axis ties Azerbaijan and Georgia to Turkey and the United States.  If this representation faithfully describes the major trends of regional policies, it is not, however, a constant and an exclusive one.
Also available online at:  http://www.da.mod.uk/colleges/csrc/document-listings/caucasus/P42-AJ.pdf
Book call no.:  327.475 J23i

Jane's World Insurgency and Terrorism.  Alexandria, VA, Jane's Information Group, 2007.  676 p.
Separatism and Islamist Militancy in the North Caucasus, pp 43-49; Chechen Guerillas, pp 468-476.
Book call no.:  R 364.1 J33 iss. 26 2007

Kilroy, Austin.  Promoting Stability on Europe's Borders:  A Comparative Study of Kosovo, Transdniestria and Abkhazia.  Watchfield, Swindon, Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, Conflict Studies Research Centre, 2006.  28 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.defac.ac.uk/colleges/csrc/document-listings/special/06%2838%29AK.pdf
Book call no.:  320.947 K48p

Lynch, Dov.  Engaging Eurasia's Separatist States:  Unresolved Conflicts and De Facto States.  Washington, United States Institute of Peace Press, 2004.  170 p.
"In the wake of the dissolution of the Soviet Union, secessionist forces carved four de facto states from parts of Moldova, Georgia, and Azerbaijan.  Ten years on, those states are mired in uncertainty.  Beset by internal problems, fearful of a return to the violence that spawned them, and isolated and unrecognized internationally, they survive behind cease-fire lines that have temporarily frozen but not resolved their conflicts with the metropolitan powers."  Author examines the political, military, and economic dynamics - both internal and external - that drive the existence of South Ossetia, Abkhazia, Transnistria, and Nagorno-Karabakh.
Book call no.:  320.947 L9871e

Main, Steven J.  The Bear, the Peacock, the Eagle, the Sturgeon and the Black, Black Oil:  Contemporary Regional Power Politics in the Caspian Sea.   Camberley, Surrey, Conflict Studies Research Centre, Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, 2005.  25 p.
The Caspian Sea region is vital for Russia and one which it cannot afford to lose, or where its influence cannot be allowed to be challenged without resistance.  Compared to the other military forces in the area, Russia's Caspian Flotilla is a significant strategic asset, which helps Russia maintain its influence also in the wider Black Sea-Caucasus-Central Asian sphere.
Also available online at:  http://www.defac.ac.uk/colleges/csrc/document-listings/caucasus/05(67)SM.pdf
Book call no.:  355.0330475 M224b

Nation, R. Craig.  Russia, the United States, and the Caucasus.  Carlisle, PA, Strategic Studies Institute, Army War College, February 2007.  40 p.
Book call no.:  327.475 N277r

No More States?  Globalization, National Self-Determination, and Terrorism, edited by Richard N. Rosecrance and Arthur A. Stein.  Lanham, MD, Rowman & Littlefield, 2006.  308 p.
Chapter 8:  The Failure of Chechen Separatism, by John Reppert and Alexei Shevchenko, pp 131-143.
Book call no.:  320.1 N739

Oliker, Olga and Szayna, Thomas S.  Faultlines of Conflict in Central Asia and the South Caucasus:  Implications for the U.S. Army.  Santa Monica, CA , RAND Arroyo Center, 2003.  379 p.
Identifies and evaluates key faultlines in Central Asia and South Caucasus and how they affect the likelihood and possible evolution of armed conflict in these regions.  Discusses the ways in which the emergence of conflict could draw the United States into the strife and examines the operational challenges that the region poses for possible Army deployments in the 2010-2015 time frame.
Also available online at:  http://www.rand.org/publications/MR/MR1598/
Book call no.:  355.033058 F263

Plunkett, Richard and Masters, Tom.  Georgia, Armenia & Azerbaijan.  2nd ed.  Oakland, CA, Lonely Planet Publications, 2004.  296 p.
Book call no.:  914.75404 P737g 2004

Shultz, Richard H. and Dew, Andrea J.  Insurgents, Terrorists, and Militias:  The Warriors of Contemporary Combat.  New York, Columbia University Press, 2006.  316 p.
Chapter 5:  Chechnya:  Russia's Bloody Quagmire, pp 102-145.
Book call no.:  355.0218 S562i

Souleimanov, Emil.  An Endless War:  The Russian-Chechen Conflict in Perspective.  New York, Peter Lang, 2006.  366 p.
Book call no.:  947.52 S722e

Wood, Tony.  Chechnya:  The Case for Independence.  New York, Verso, 2007.  199 p.
Book call no.:  947.52 W879c


Documents

Hlosek, Andrea L.  The Mechanics of Russian Foreign Policy in the Caucasus and Central Asia:  Regional Hegemony or Neo-Imperialism?  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2006.  137 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA445372
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42525 H6772m

Johnson, Mark E.  The Chechen Conflict:  A Case for U. S. Intervention.  Fort Leavenworth, KS, School of Advanced Military Studies, Army Command and General Staff College, 2006.  67 p.
With Russia’s inability to improve conditions in Chechnya and the international community’s failed attempts to negotiate a diplomatic resolution to the conflict, Islamic extremism in Chechnya is growing precipitously and risks spilling over into the neighboring republics of Ingushetia, Dagestan and Kabardino-Balkaria and the neighboring country of Georgia.  Author argues that if the United States does not use its influence to resolve the Chechen conflict and thus preempt the growth of Islamic extremism in the North Caucasus, Chechnya risks devolving into a major front in the war on terrorism.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA450593
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022-2 J684c

Kennelly, Kevin G.  The Role of NATO and the EU in Resolving Frozen Conflicts.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2006.  115 p.
On Europe’s periphery lie a number of unresolved conflicts and unrecognized states, most of which emerged during the dissolution of the Soviet Union.  Due to their remote and strategically insignificant nature, they were largely ignored by the West as it peacefully integrated Central and Eastern Europe into the community of liberal democracies.  Russia utilized the lack of international concern to prolong the conflicts in Abkhazia, South Ossetia, Transnistria, and Nagorno Karabakh and destabilize the smaller states emerging from the Soviet Union.  This study shows that NATO and the EU have the ability to resolve frozen conflicts through their influence on the third parties that are preserving them.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA462609
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42525 K363r

Nichol, James P.  Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia:  Political Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests.  Washington, Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, 2007.  29 p.
Online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA471340
Also available online at:  http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/row/RL33453.pdf
Book call no.:  M-U 42953-1 no.07-RL33453

Povak, Christopher S.  Repaving the Silk Road:  Prospects for U.S.-Russian Cooperation in the Trans-Caspian Region.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2005.  39 p.
Situated between China, Russia, and the Middle East, the nations of the region are geopolitically significant to the world's major powers.  However despite their bountiful resources and a steadily increasing global interest, the nations of Central Asia and the South Caucasus are also among the world's poorest, socially repressed, and politically corrupt.  Such conditions cultivate the growing presence of drug trafficking, religious extremism, and terrorism throughout the region.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 P8791r


Periodicals

Antonenko, Oksana.  Further Conflict on the Cards for Troubled South Ossetia.  Jane's Intelligence Review 17:28-31 November 2005.

Arasli, Jahangir.  The Rising Wind:  Is the Caucasus Emerging as a Hub for Terrorism, Smuggling, and Trafficking?  Connections:  The Quarterly Journal 6:5-26 Spring 2007.
Also available online at:  http://www.ciaonet.org/olj/co/co_spring2007/co_spring2007_b_arasli.pdf

Baev, Pavel K.  Putin's Counter-Terrorism:  The Parameters of a Strategic Dead-End.  Small Wars & Insurgencies 17:1-21 March 2006.
Russia's struggle against terrorism has been used instrumentally by President Putin for achieving a range of international and domestic political goals.  This trademark instrumentalization, however, has been stretched beyond its limits.  The stagnant and deeply criminalized hostilities in Chechnya are now resonating across the North Caucasus.  For a long time, Chechnya has been an isolated 'black hole', but now it is rather the eye of the storm engulfing the whole region.
Also available online at:  http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=0959%2d2318&volume=17&issue=1&spage=1

Blank, Stephen.  Russia's Project 2008:  Reforming the Military and Preparing a Coup.  World Affairs 169:65-79 Fall 2006.
Since 2004, the Chechen war has spread into the North Caucasus.  The extension of this war places the entire region of the North Caucasus at risk for an unending, long-term terrorist insurgency.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1158486331&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Bodansky, Yossef.  The "Emirate of the Caucasus" Opens a New Chapter in the Global Jihad.  Defense & Foreign Affairs Strategic Policy 35, no. 11-12:4-6 2007.
In October 2007, Dokka Umarov, the self-declared President of the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria, announced the establishment of the Islamic Emirate of the Caucasus as an integral part of the global jihadist movement.

Boustany, Nora.  Chechen Warns of Islamic Extremism:  Appeal of Militant Ideology is Spreading in North Caucasus, Rights Activist Says.  Washington Post, p A12, February 6, 2008.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1424416521&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Bowers, Stephen R. and others.  Islam in Ingushetia and Chechnya.  Journal of Social, Political, and Economic Studies 29:395-407 Winter 2004.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=778364241&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Carothers, Thomas.  The Backlash Against Democracy Promotion.  Foreign Affairs 85:55-68 March-April 2006.
Discusses the denouncement of Western democracy assistance by a growing number of countries.  In revolutions in Georgia, Ukraine, and Kyrgyzstan, U.S. political groups have played key behind-the-scenes roles.  To remain effective, groups that promote overseas democracy must rethink their methods.  Democracy must be promoted as a matter of principle, not just an expedient way to justify military actions that create regime changes in unfriendly governments.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=19895477&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Dunlop, John B. and Menon, Rajan.  Chaos in the North Caucasus and Russia's Future.  Survival 48:97-114 Summer 2006.
Also available online at:  http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=0039%2d6338&volume=48&issue=2&spage=97

The Emergence of a Caucasus Emirate.  Jane's Islamic Affairs Analyst, p 16, December 2007.
Chechen rebel leader Doku Umarov has committed himself to the creation of the Muslim "Emirate of the North Caucasus" with himself as emir, a move that has divided anti-Russian militants and also signalled Umarov's identification with international jihadist groups.

Evangelista, Matthew.  Is Putin the New de Gaulle?  A Comparison of the Chechen and Algerian Wars.  Post-Soviet Affairs 21:360-377 October-December 2005 .
Also available online at:  http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bell/soviet/2005/00000021/00000004/art00004

Fall, Brian.  Conflict in the South Caucasus.  Asian Affairs 37:198-209 July 2006.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=21001356&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Gammer, Moshe.  Between Mecca and Moscow:  Islam, Politics and Political Islam in Chechnya and Daghestan.  Middle Eastern Studies 41:833-848 November 2005.
Focuses on the rise of Islamic fundamentalism in Chechnia and Dagestan, Russia.  Examines the reasons behind the survival of Islam in the republics, the division of the Daghestanis by the Soviet authorities, and the common characteristics of the Muslim people in both republics.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=18786934&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Gammer, Moshe.  The Road Not Taken:  Daghestan and Chechen Independence.  Central Asian Survey 24:97-107 June 2005.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=17783978&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

German, Tracey C.  Visibly Invisible:  EU Engagement in Conflict Resolution in the South Caucasus.  European Security 16:357-374 September-December 2007.

Giragosian, Richard.  The US Military Engagement in Central Asia and the Southern Caucasus:  An Overview.  Journal of Slavic Military Studies 17:129-151 March 2004.
Also available online at:  http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1351-8046&volume=17&issue=1&spage=43

Henkin, Yagil.  From Tactical Terrorism to Holy War:  The Evolution of Chechen Terrorism, 1995-2004.  Central Asian Survey 25:193-204 March-June 2006.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=22909444&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Hunter, Shireen T.  Borders, Conflict, and Security in the Caucasus:  The Legacy of the Past.  SAIS Review 26:111-125 Winter-Spring 2006.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1048937171&sid=2&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Knysh, Alexander.  Contextualizing the Salafi-Sufi Conflict (from the Northern Caucasus to Hadramawt).  Middle Eastern Studies 43:503-530 July 2007.
Also available online at:  http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/mes/2007/00000043/00000004/art00001

Kolossov, Vladimir and Toal, Gerard.  An Empire's Fraying Edge?  The North Caucasus Instability in Contemporary Russia's Geopolitical Culture.  Eurasian Geography and Economics 48:202-225 March-April 2007.
Authors examine competing elite storylines in Russian geopolitical culture about the North Caucasus during a year (October 2005-September 2006) that encompassed the large-scale terrorist attack against the city of Nal'chik, the change of leadership in Dagestan, and the assassination of the prominent terrorist Shamil Basayev by federal forces.  They first summarize Kremlin, left/Communist, national-patriotic, and liberal "storylines" on the basis of a content analysis of major periodicals representing each of these viewpoints, followed by a survey of the opinions of ordinary citizens in the North Caucasus.
Also available online at:  http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bell/psg/2007/00000048/00000002/art00005

Kotanjian, Hayk.  Armenian Security and U. S. Foreign Policy in the South Caucasus.  Connections:  The Quarterly Journal 3:15-32 June 2004.
Also available online at:  http://www.ciaonet.org/olj/co/co_jun04/co_jun04c.pdf

Kramer, Mark.  Guerrilla Warfare, Counterinsurgency and Terrorism in the North Caucasus:  The Military Dimension of the Russian-Chechen Conflict.  Europe-Asia Studies 57:209-290 March 2005.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=16670098&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Kurz, Robert W. and Bartles, Charles K.  Chechen Suicide Bombers.  Journal of Slavic Military Studies 20:529-547 October-November 2007.
US military commanders are concerned that militant Chechens, trained in suicide bombing and extremist tactics, are available to support Taliban elements in Afghanistan today.
Also available online at:  http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=issue&issn=1351%2d8046&volume=20&issue=4

Lewis, Jonathan Eric.  Replace Turkey as a Strategic Partner?  Middle East Quarterly 13:1-8 Spring 2006.
Includes discussion of the need for an active and engaged U.S. approach to Azerbaijan, Armenia, Georgia and Romania.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=21333484&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Matsuzato, Kimitaka.  The Regional Context of Islam in Russia:  Diversities Along the Volga.  Eurasian Geography and Economics 47:449-461 July-August 2006.
Presents case studies of six regions within the Volga and North Caucasus districts in an effort to demonstrate the importance of the regional context in which Russia's Muslims reside.  Drawing upon field interviews and information from local media, the author shows how the milieu in which Islam is practiced diverges markedly across regional boundaries.
Also available online at:  http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bell/psg/2006/00000047/00000004/art00004

Mendelson, Sarah E.  Anatomy of Ambivalence:  The International Community and Human Rights Abuse in the North Caucasus.  Problems of Post-Communism 53:3-15 November-December 2006.
Discusses the politics of international organizations regarding human rights abuses in the Caucasus and the Russian government's relations with the organizations.  Many organizations avoid the Caucasus altogether while others behave as if they were carrying out their duties but do not actually do so.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=23496612&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Mukhina, Irina.  Islamic Terrorism and the Question of National Liberation, or Problems of Contemporary Chechen Terrorism.  Studies in Conflict and Terrorism 28:515-532 November-December 2005.
Authors analyze various instances of Chechen terrorism, 1991–2002, to conclude that the dynamics of terrorism do not support claims that Chechen rebels are fighting a war of independence and that the Russian government's failure “to let Chechnya go” instigates future acts of terrorism.
Also available online at:  http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/uter/2005/00000028/00000006/art00004

Nichol, Jim.  Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia:  Security Issues and Implications for U. S. Interests.  Current Politics and Economics of Russia, Eastern and Central Europe 22:351-411 2007.

O'Loughlin, John and others.  The Caucasus in a Time of Conflict, Demographic Transition, and Economic Change.  Eurasian Geography and Economics 48, no. 2:135-156 2007.
Also available online at:  http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bell/psg/2007/00000048/00000002/art00003

Oversloot, Hans and Van De Berg, Ger P.  Politics and the Ethnic Divide:  Is Dagestan Changing from Complex to Simple Oligarchy?  Journal of Communist Studies & Transition Politics 21:307-331 September 2005.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=18288359&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Radicalizing Russia's Caucasian Muslims.  Jane's Islamic Affairs Analyst, pp 13-15, October 2007.
The Russian North Caucasus is again in crisis, with an upsurge in violence in both Dagestan and Ingushetia.  While militant separatists have been largely defeated in Chechnya, violence and insurgency, increasingly driven by organized jihadi and nationalist militant groups, has spread to neighboring regions.

Radvanyi, Jean and Muduyev, Shakhmardan S.  Challenges Facing the Mountain Peoples of the Caucasus.  Eurasian Geography and Economics 48:157-177 March-April 2007.
Discusses the impacts of new post-Soviet borders and controls as well as unresolved conflicts in Nagorno-Karabakh, Chechnya, South Ossetia, Abkhazia, and the Prigorodnyy district of North Ossetia, which have disrupted traditional ways of life and forced the peoples of the mountains to migrate or adjust their economic activities.
Also available online at:  http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bell/psg/2007/00000048/00000002/art00003

Reynolds, Michael.  Myths and Mysticism:  A Longitudinal Perspective on Islam and Conflict in the North Caucasus.  Middle Eastern Studies 41:31-54 January 2005.
Also available online at:  http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/mes/2005/00000041/00000001/art00002

Russell, John.  Terrorists, Bandits, Spooks and Thieves:  Russian Demonisation of the Chechens Before and Since 9/11.   Third World Quarterly 26:101-116 February 2005.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=16188211&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Sagramoso, Domitilla.  Violence and Conflict in the Russian North Caucasus.  International Affairs 83:681-705 July 2007.
A loose network of formally autonomous violent groups, or Islamic jamaats, has developed throughout the North Caucasus.  Islamic ideals seem to guide and inspire much of the terrorist violence, although they are intermingled with deep nationalist sentiments, especially among rebel groups in Chechnya.  However, the intricacies of the violence in the North Caucasus are much more complex, and are only partially related to the spread of radical Islam and separatist aspirations.  Instability and violence in the North Caucasus may spread into areas that are of growing significance not only to Europe, but also to the United States and the Atlantic alliance.

Speckhard, Anne and Ahkmedova, Khapta.  The Making of a Martyr:  Chechen Suicide Terrorism.  Studies in Conflict and Terrorism 29:429-492 July-August 2006.
The ideology supporting Chechen suicide terrorism is very similar to the global jihadist ideology but remains more nationalist in its goals.  It functions for the bombers much like short lived psychological first aid—answering their posttraumatic concerns in a way that shortly leads to their deaths.  Unlike the Palestinian case, there is little social support for suicide terrorism in Chechnya.
Also available online at:  http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/uter/2006/00000029/00000005/art00004

Taheri, Amir.  The Caspian.  American Foreign Policy Interests 29:395-399 November-December 2007.
Focuses on Iran's complex relationships with its neighbors in the Caspian Sea region.

Taylor, Brian D.  Putin's "Historic Mission":  State-Building and the Power Ministries in the North Caucasus.  Problems of Post-Communism 54:3-16 November-December 2007.
"Putin may have succeeded in imposing order in Chechnya, although it is too early to tell for sure, but he has not eliminated the corrupt, patrimonial, and predatory behavior of the Russian power ministries that is undermining state efficiency and capacity throughout the North Caucasus."
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=27760057&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Trapsh, Nicolay.  The North Caucasus and the Multilevel International Subsystem.  Problems of Post-Communism 54:38-48 March-April 2007.
The North Caucasus is a critical region for combating terrorism and extremism and transiting energy resources.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=24749275&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Vendina, Olga and others.  The Wars in Chechnya and Their Effects on Neighboring Regions.  Eurasian Geography and Economics 48:178-201 March 2007.
Also available online at:  http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bell/psg/2007/00000048/00000002/art00004

Walker, Edward W.  Islam, Territory, and Contested Space in Post-Soviet Russia.  Eurasian Geography and Economics 46:247-271 June 2005 .
Reviews the political, institutional, and territorial complexities identified with the Muslim minority in the Russian Federation.  Discusses the size and distribution of Muslim communities, the government's approach to the diverse adherents of Islam (including Wahhabis), fragmentation of Islamic institutions, and federal policies before and after the October 2004 terrorist attack on the school in Beslan, North Ossetia.  Considerable attention is devoted to differences between Islamo-internationalism and Islamo-nationalism in Chechnya, as well as similarities and differences among approaches to Muslim affairs in Russia and other parts of Europe.
Also available online at:  http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bell/psg/2005/00000046/00000004/art00001

Wilhelmsen, Julie and Flikke, Geir.  Evidence of Russia's Bush Doctrine in the CIS.  European Security 14:387-417 September 2005.
Discusses the emergence of a Russian version of the Bush doctrine in the Commonwealth of Independent States and Russian officials' conceptual stretching of the strategic culture embodied in the National Security Concept and the Military Doctrine from 2000 onwards.  While these documents seem to cherish multilateralism and United Nations primacy in questions of global and regional security, terrorist attacks on Russia proper have engendered a more assertive approach to regional security issues in the Caucasus and Central Asia.
Also available online at:  http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/feus/2005/00000014/00000003/art00005


Armenia


Internet Resources

Armenia Country Review, 2008
Available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bth&bquery=((JN+%22Armenia+Country+Review%22+and+DT+20080701))&type=0&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv
Several articles about Armenia, each one about a different aspect.  Coverage includes overviews of Armenia's politics, economics, defense, foreign relations, and social issues.

Armenia Maps.  Austin, TX, Perry-Casteneda Library Map Collection.
Available online at:  http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/armenia.html

Giragosian, Richard.  Redefining Armenian National Security.  Demokratizatsiya 14:223-234 Spring 2006.
Available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=21615248&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv
For Armenia, geographically landlocked and subject to blockade, national security is dominated by an external focus on the Nagarno-Karabakh conflict.  Yet the gravest threat to Armenian national security is not an external one, but is rooted in the internal challenge of corruption.  Armenia offers a greater degree of political stability and institutional democracy than its neighbors, but it has been unable to confront this core internal threat.

Halperin, Tony.  Isolated Nation in a Sea of Instability Puts Its Democracy to the TestTimes (London) p. 52, May 12, 2007.
Available online at:  http://www.lexis-nexis.com/universe
Access to this article is available through the Lexis-Nexis database; search by title. Air University students have password access.

Itano, Nicole.  Another Theater for US-Iran Fallout:  The South Caucasus.  Christian Science Monitor, p 7, May 21, 2007.
Available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=25128328&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv
As tensions between Iran and the West approach a boiling point, Armenia is finding it increasingly difficult to negotiate the often conflicting alliances in its complicated neighborhood.  Its precarious position illustrates the potentially destabilizing consequences of a Western standoff with Iran on not only the Middle East, but the South Caucasus as well.

Sahakyan, Vahe and Atanesyan, Arthur.  Democratization in Armenia:  Some Trends of Political Culture and Behavior.  Demokratizatsiya 14:347-354 Summer 2006.
Available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=22546276&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

United States. Dept. of State.  Background Note:  Armenia.  February 2008.
Available online at:  http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/5275.htm


Books

After Independence:  Making and Protecting the Nation in Postcolonial and Postcommunist States, edited by Lowell W. Barrington.  Ann Arbor, University of Michigan Press, 2006.  306 p.
Chapter 9:  Post-Soviet Armenia:  Nationalism & Its Discontents, by Razmik Panossian, pp 225-247.
Book call no.:  320.54 A258

Akerman, Ella.  Political Culture Case Studies.  [Camberley, Surrey] , Conflict Studies Research Centre, Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, 2003.  79 p.
Political Culture & Democracy Building:  The Case of Armenia, by Aghavni Karakhanian, pp 3-13.
Book call no.:  306.2 P7694

Curtis, Glenn E.  Involvement of Russian Organized Crime Syndicates, Criminal Elements in the Russian Military, and Regional Terrorist Groups in Narcotics Trafficking in Central Asia, the Caucasus, and Chechnya.  Washington, Federal Research Division, Library of Congress, October 2002.  36 p.
Describes the current status of narcotics trafficking in four countries of Central Asia (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan), in the three former Soviet republics of the south Caucasus (Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia), and in Chechnya.  Reveals the role of Russian organized crime and Central Asian terrorist organizations.
Also available online at:  http://www.loc.gov/rr/frd/pdf-files/RussianOrgCrime.pdf
Book call no.:  364.1060947 C978i

Dryzek, John S. and Holmes, Leslie Templeman.  Post-Communist Democratization:  Political Discourses across Thirteen Countries.  New York, Cambridge University Press, 2002.  300 p.
Includes chapters on Armenia, pp 133-146 and Georgia, pp 147-157.
Book call no.:  320.947 D811p

Eastern Europe, Russia and Central Asia, 2008.  London, Europa Publications, 2007.  758 p.
Armenia, pp 61-90.  Includes a chronology, historical background, economic information, a statistical survey, and a bibliography.
Book call no.:  R 947 E13b 8th ed. 2008

Hewsen, Robert H. and Salvatico, Christopher C.  Armenia:  A Historical Atlas .  Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 2001.  341 p.
Book call no.:  911.4756 H613a

Jane's Sentinel:  Country Risk Assessments:  Russia and the CIS.  Alexandria, VA, Jane's Information Group, 2007.  788 p.
Armenia, pp 3-63.
Book call no.:  R 947.086 J33 iss. 21 2007

Libaridian, Gerard J.  Modern Armenia:  People, Nation, State .  New Brunswick, NJ, Transaction Publishers, 2004.  327 p.
Reviews Armenian politics and political thinking from the mid-nineteenth century to the present and the evolution of Armenians from peoplehood to statehood.  Analyzes the internal dynamics of the revolutionary movement, the Genocide, the Armenian Diaspora, Armenia's independence, and the relationship of these developments to processes in the Ottoman/Turkish, Russian, and Western states.
Book call no.:  947.5608 L694m


Document

Abelyan, Armen V.  Russia's National Interests in the Transcaucasus and the U.S. Policy:  Implications for Armenian National Security.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2006.  133 p.
Argues that Armenia, despite its limited natural resource base and geopolitical complexities, has managed its foreign relations and has addressed its national security concerns quite well. It has maintained good relations with both Russia and the United States, helping to reduce regional polarization and its own security dependence on either of the powers.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA445283
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42525 A1411r


Periodicals

Bush, George W.  Message on Armenian Remembrance Day.  Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents 43:522 April 30, 2007.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=24965621&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Cohen, Sara.  A Brief History of the Armenian Genocide.  Social Education 69:333-337 October 2005.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=18589364&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Kotanjian, Hayk.  Armenian Security and U. S. Foreign Policy in the South Caucasus.  Connections:  The Quarterly Journal 3:15-32 June 2004.
Also available online at:  http://www.ciaonet.org/olj/co/co_jun04/co_jun04c.pdf

Markarian, Andranik.  Balancing Act.  Jane's Intelligence Review 19:66 March 2007.
An interview with Armenian Prime Minister Andranik Markarian, who mentions that the main foreign policy challenge facing Armenia is balancing relations with both the West and Russia.

Rowland, Richard H.  Recent Demographic Trends in Armenia:  Results of the 2001 Census and Update to 2006.  Eurasian Geography and Economics 48:73-94 February 2007.
Also available online at:  http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bell/psg/2007/00000048/00000001/art00007

Tavernise, Sabrina.  Thousands in Armenia Protest Results of Presidential Election.  New York Times  p. A7, February 21, 2008.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1432299281&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

The Ties That Divide.  Economist 379:59 June 17 2006 .
Discusses the reopening of the borders between Armenia and Turkey.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=21213534&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv


Azerbaijan


Internet Resources

Azerbaijan Maps.  Austin, TX, Perry-Casteneda Library Map Collection.
Available online at:  http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/azerbaijan.html

Kotchikian, Asbed.  Secular Nationalism Versus Political Islam in Azerbaijan.  Terrorism Monitor  Washington, Jamestown Foundation, February 10, 2005.
Available online at:  http://jamestown.org/terrorism/news/article.php?articleid=2369245

Valiyev, Anar.  Al-Qaeda in Azerbaijan:  Myths and Realities.  Terrorism Monitor  Washington, Jamestown Foundation, May 18, 2006.
Available online at:  http://jamestown.org/terrorism/news/article.php?articleid=2370001

Valiyev, Anar.  Azerbaijan Increasingly Caught Between Salafism and Iran.  Terrorism Monitor  Washington, Jamestown Foundation, October 11, 2007.
Available online at:  http://jamestown.org/terrorism/news/article.php?articleid=2373711


Books

Akerman, Ella.  Political Culture Case Studies.  [Camberley, Surrey] , Conflict Studies Research Centre, Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, 2003.  79 p.
Political Culture & Challenges in Azerbaijan:  Past, Today & Future, by Razi Nurullayev, pp 14-25.
Book call no.:  306.2 P7694

Azerbaijan's 2005 Elections:  Lost Opportunity.  Brussels, International Crisis Group, 2005.  19 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.crisisgroup.org/library/documents/europe/caucasus/b040_azerbaijan_s_2005_elections_lost_opportunity.pdf
Book call no.:  320.94754 A993

Blandy, Charles.  Azerbaijan:  Permanently Between Scylla and Charybdis?  Watchfield, Swindon, Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, Conflict Studies Research Centre, 2006.  16 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.defac.ac.uk/colleges/csrc/document-listings/caucasus/06%2833%29CWB.pdf
Book call no.:  947.54086 B642a

Curtis, Glenn E.  Involvement of Russian Organized Crime Syndicates, Criminal Elements in the Russian Military, and Regional Terrorist Groups in Narcotics Trafficking in Central Asia, the Caucasus, and Chechnya.  Washington, Federal Research Division, Library of Congress, October 2002.  36 p.
Describes the current status of narcotics trafficking in four countries of Central Asia (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan), in the three former Soviet republics of the south Caucasus (Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia), and in Chechnya.  Reveals the role of Russian organized crime and Central Asian terrorist organizations.
Also available online at:  http://www.loc.gov/rr/frd/pdf-files/RussianOrgCrime.pdf
Book call no.:  364.1060947 C978i

Defense & Foreign Affairs Handbook on Azerbaijan.  2nd ed.  Alexandria, VA, International Strategic Studies Association, 2007.  191 p.
Includes:  the strategic framework, economy, defenses, strategic industrial base; domestic security structure, strategic leadership and foreign policy apparatus, and the media.
Book call no.:  320.94754 D313

Eastern Europe, Russia and Central Asia, 2008.  London, Europa Publications, 2007.  758 p.
Azerbaijan, pp 91-121.  Includes a chronology, historical background, economic information, a statistical survey, and a bibliography.
Book call no.:  R 947 E13b 8th ed. 2008

Jane's Sentinel:  Country Risk Assessments:  Russia and the CIS.  Alexandria, VA, Jane's Information Group, 2007.  788 p.
Azerbaijan, pp 67-144.
Book call no.:  R 947.086 J33 iss. 21 2007

The Limits of Culture:  Islam and Foreign Policy, edited by Brenda Shaffer.  Cambridge, MA, MIT Press, 2006.  350 p.
Culture and Alliances:  U. S. Portrayals of Saudi Arabia, Azerbaijan, and Kazakhstan Before and After September 11, 2001, by Ido Oren, pp 111-165; Congress, Constituencies, and U. S. Foreign Policy in the Caspian, by David King and Miles Pomper, pp. 167-192.
Book call no.:  327.091767 L734

Refugees Azerbaijan.  Baku, Azerbaijan, [s.n.], 1997.  175 p.
Chiefly pictorial, this book depicts Azerbaijani refugees in Baku during the conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan over Nagorny-Karabakh.
Book call no.:  362.87 R332


Periodicals

Balci, Bayram.  Between Sunnism and Shiism:  Islam in Post-Soviet Azerbaijan.  Central Asian Survey 23:205-217 June 2004.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=15901387&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Bayulgen, O.  Facing the Dilemma of Global Capitalism:  The Case of Azerbaijan.  Central Asian Survey 22:209-220 June 2003.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=12252435&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Clements, Matthew.  Azerbaijan and Georgia Seek Energy Autonomy from Russia.  Jane's Intelligence Review 19:5 February 2007.

Crandall, Maureen S.  Low Grades for Petro-States in the Former Soviet Union.  Journal of Third World Studies 24:189-210 Spring 2007.
Evaluates the economic, social, and political progress of Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.  Also discusses the militarization of the region and the potential for conflict.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=25326037&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv


Nagorno-Karabakh Conflict


Internet Resources

Freizer, Sabine.  Putting the Freeze on a Frozen Conflict.  Boston Globe, p A21, December 25, 2007.
Available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1405098191&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD
The 1991-94 war between the two former Soviet republics left some 25,000 dead and more than a million people displaced from their homes - an incredible toll for a strip of land hardly bigger than Rhode Island.  The shaky cease-fire left Nagorno-Karabakh, an ethnic Armenian enclave within Azerbaijan, as well as significant adjacent territory in the hands of Armenian forces, and Azerbaijan has been spoiling to take it back.

Giragosian, Richard.  Redefining Armenian National Security.  Demokratizatsiya 14:223-234 Spring 2006.
Available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=21615248&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv
For Armenia, geographically landlocked and subject to blockade, national security is dominated by an external focus on the Nagarno-Karabakh conflict.  Yet the gravest threat to Armenian national security is not an external one, but is rooted in the internal challenge of corruption.  Armenia offers a greater degree of political stability and institutional democracy than its neighbors, but it has been unable to confront this core internal threat.

Ismailzade, Fariz.  Karabakh Again the Focus of Foreign Policy.  Washington, Jamestown Foundation, February 7, 2008.
Available online at:  http://jamestown.org/edm/article.php?article_id=2372785
After rather a calm year in 2007, conflict over Karabakh is once again emerging as a primary foreign policy focus in both Armenia and Azerbaijan.  Last year, Azerbaijani and Armenian politicians, as well as international mediators, struggled to find a breakthrough in the peace talks over the ongoing conflict for control of the region but achieved few results.

Itano, Nicole.  The Wannabe Nation of Nagorno-Karabakh.  Christian Science Monitor, p 20, May 30, 2007.
Available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1279389181&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Nagorno-Karabakh:  Risking War.  New York, International Crisis Group, November 14, 2007.  26 p.
Available online at:  http://www.crisisgroup.org/home/index.cfm?id=5157&l=1

San, Hakan.  The Ethnic Dimension of Alliance Formation:  Alignment Patterns in the Nagorno-Karabakh Conflict.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, December 2007.  95 p.
Available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA475789

Taking Command in Karabakh.  Transitions Online.  August 6, 2007.
Available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=26137037&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv
Discusses the recent presidential election in the disputed region of Nagorno-Karabakh.


Books

Conflict Between Armenia and Azerbaijan.  Baku, [s.n.], 2005.  95 p.
Book call no.:  947.54086 C748

Croissant, Michael P.  The Armenia-Azerbaijan Conflict:  Causes and Implications .  Westport, CT, Praeger, 1998.  172 p.
Book call no.:  947.5404756 C942a

De Waal, Thomas.  Black Garden:  Armenia and Azerbaijan Through Peace and War.  New York , New York University Press, 2003.  337 p.
In 1991-94, the dispute over Nagorny-Karabakh became the first interstate war in the former USSR, leading to 20,000 deaths and one of the biggest refugee flows of modern times.  Author describes the conflict between two former Soviet neighbors, its disastrous consequences, and the efforts of Russia, France and the United States to bring peace to the Caucasus.
Book call no.:  947.54085 D515b

Diasporas in Conflict:  Peace-Makers or Peace-Wreckers?, edited by Hazel Smith and Paul Stares.  New York, United Nations University Press, 2007.  318 p.
Chapter 6:  The Armenian Diaspora and the Karabagh Conflict Since 1988, by Khachig Tololyan, pp 106-128.
Book call no.:  304.8 D541

German, Tracey C.  Untangling the Karabakh Knot.  Camberley, Surrey , Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, Conflict Studies Research Centre, 2005.  12 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.defac.ac.uk/colleges/csrc/document-listings/caucasus/05%2828%29-TG.pdf
Book call no.:  947.54086 G61u

International Crisis Group.  Nagorno-Karabakh:  Viewing the Conflict from the Ground.  Brussels, International Crisis Group, 2005.  (Europe report; No. 166)
Also available online at:  http://www.crisisgroup.org/library/documents/europe/caucasus/166_nagorno_karabakh_viewing_the_conflict_from_the_ground.pdf
Book call no.:  947.54086 N152

Jane's Sentinel:  Country Risk Assessments:  Russia and the CIS.  Alexandria, VA, Jane's Information Group, 2007.  788 p.
Nagorno-Karabakh, pp 129-138.
Book call no.:  R 947.086 J33 iss. 21 2007

Lynch, Dov.  Engaging Eurasia's Separatist States:  Unresolved Conflicts and De Facto States.  Washington, United States Institute of Peace Press, 2004.  170 p.
"In the wake of the dissolution of the Soviet Union, secessionist forces carved four de facto states from parts of Moldova, Georgia, and Azerbaijan.  Ten years on, those states are mired in uncertainty.  Beset by internal problems, fearful of a return to the violence that spawned them, and isolated and unrecognized internationally, they survive behind cease-fire lines that have temporarily frozen but not resolved their conflicts with the metropolitan powers."  Author examines the political, military, and economic dynamics - both internal and external - that drive the existence of South Ossetia, Abkhazia, Transnistria, and Nagorno-Karabakh.
Book call no.:  320.947 L9871e

Mehtiyev, Elkhan.  Armenia-Azerbaijan Prague Process:  Road Map to Peace or Stalemate for Uncertainty?  Camberley, Surrey, Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, Conflict Studies Research Centre, 2005.  20 p.
Also available online at: http://www.defac.ac.uk/colleges/csrc/document-listings/caucasus/05(23)-EM.pdf
Book call no.:  947.54086 M498a

Russia:  Re-Emerging Great Power, edited by Roger E. Kanet.  New York, Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.  229 p.
Chapter 6:  Governance and Diplomacy as Attributes of a Great Power:  Russia and the Three Enclaves -- Kaliningrad, Nagorno-Karabakh and Nakhchivan, by Susanne Nies, pp 124-151.
Book call no.:  320.947 R9693


Periodicals

Gorvett, Jon.  Border Solution Offers Peace Dividends.  Middle East  No. 383:36 November 2007.
The 268-km. frontier between Armenia and Turkey has been sealed since 1993, in response to the conflict between Armenia and Turkey's ally, Azerbaijan, over the disputed territory of Nagorno-Karabakh.  The border closure was clearly designed to place diplomatic and economic pressure on Yerevan to reach a settlement with Azerbaijan. Yet 14 years later, such a settlement still seems some way off.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1383347641&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

The Risk of a Thaw.  Economist 385:65 December 1, 2007.
Discusses the conflict between the Armenian and Azerbaijani people over the enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh, and speculates on the potential for the conflict to escalate into full blown war.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=27728188&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv


Georgia


Internet Resources

Barron, Owen.  A Rivalry Revived.  Harvard International Review 29:10-11 Spring 2007.
Available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=25047630&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv
Author reflects on the expressed intention of Vladimir Putin to normalize Russia's relations with former satellite state Georgia.  Fueled by the dispute in the two semi-autonomous regions of Abkhazia and South Ossetia, and the alignment of Georgia with the West, the conflict between the two countries is far from over.

Geehreng, Paul F.  Confronting the Ghost of Stalin:  Euro-Atlantic Efforts to Secure Georgia.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, December 2007.  115 p.
Available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA475878
Georgia has become the most westward-oriented state in the Transcaucasus, and its government has vigorously pursued NATO membership.  But Moscow has made its view clear that NATO encroachment into the South Caucasus poses a threat to its national security, and has attempted to keep Georgia destabilized.  Author examines how the degree to which Western governments are willing to confront coercive activity will largely determine the success or failure of Georgia's transition to a stable democracy.

Georgia Country Review, 2008
Available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bth&bquery=((JN+%22Georgia+Country+Review%22+and+DT+20080701))&type=0&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv
Provides access to several articles about Georgia, each one discussing a different aspect.  Coverage includes overviews of politics, economics, defense, foreign relations, and social issues.

Georgia:  Sliding Toward Authoritarianism.  New York, International Crisis Group, December 19, 2007.  32 p.
Available online at:  http://www.crisisgroup.org/home/index.cfm?id=5233&l=1
The government’s repressive and disproportionate response to peaceful protests in November 2007 shocked Western capitals, which had viewed Georgia as a beacon of democracy in a region of illiberal regimes.  Since the Rose Revolution, however, President Mikheil Saakashvili’s administration has become increasingly intolerant of dissent as it has sought to reform inefficient post-Soviet institutions, stimulate a deeply dysfunctional economy, regain the breakaway regions of Abkhazia and South Ossetia, and deal with its meddling Russian neighbour.

Gorst, Isabel and Peel, Quentin.  Liberal Laboratory at Russia's Door.  Financial Times (London) p. 1, October 31, 2007.
Available online at:  http://us.ft.com/ftgateway/superpage.ft?news_id=fto103120070219511170
On the eve of its Rose Revolution, the former Soviet republic of Georgia was little better than a failed state, its bureaucracy riddled with corruption, public finances in disarray, and population in severe decline.  Today the country has been transformed into a model of economic reform, and the darling of international financial institutions.  After a bonfire of bureaucracy and a whirlwind program of privatization, Georgia boasts an annual economic growth rate of 10 per cent, based on a surge in foreign investment.

Indans, Ivars.  Relations of Russia and Georgia:  Developments and Future Prospects.  Baltic Security & Defence Review 9:131-149  2007.
Available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=26112428&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv
Analyzes Georgian and Russian relations from the European Union and North Atlantic Treaty Organization perspective.

Jones, Stephen F.  The Rose Revolution:  A Revolution Without Revolutionaries?  Cambridge Review of International Affairs 19:33-48 March 2006.
Available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=20189686&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Kucera, Joshua.  Georgia:  State of Emergency Dents Tbilisi's NATO Hopes.  Eurasia Insight  November 16, 2007.
Available online at:  http://www.eurasianet.org/departments/insight/articles/eav111607b.shtml

Pardek, Simon.  In Russia's Shadow.  New Presence:  The Prague Journal of Central European Affairs 9:48-50  Summer 2007.
Available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=25954158&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv
Discusses the history of the Georgian-Russian relationship.

Republic of Georgia Maps.  Austin, TX, Perry-Casteneda Library Map Collection.
Available online at:  http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/georgia_republic.html

Saakashvili, Mikheil.  The Way Forward.  Harvard International Review 28:68-73 Spring 2006.
Available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=20781451&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv
Discusses the status of economy and politics in Georgia after the collapse of the Soviet Union.

Socor, Vladimir.  Georgia's Hard-Earned Christmas Present:  Russian Military Out of Tblisi.   Eurasia Daily Monitor  Washington, Jamestown Foundation, January 2, 2007.
Available online at:  http://www.jamestown.org/edm/article.php?article_id=2371761


Books

After Independence:  Making and Protecting the Nation in Postcolonial and Postcommunist States, edited by Lowell W. Barrington.  Ann Arbor, University of Michigan Press, 2006.  306 p.
Chapter 10:  Georgia:  Nationalism from Under the Rubble, by Stephen Jones, pp 248-276.
Book call no.:  320.54 A258

Blandy, C. W.  Georgia:  The Death of Zurab Zhvaniya:  A Setback for President, Government and Country.  Camberley, Surrey, Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, Conflict Studies Research Centre, 2005.  14 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.defac.ac.uk/colleges/csrc/document-listings/caucasus/05%2808%29-CWB.pdf
Book call no.:  947.58086 B642g

Bugajski, Janusz.  The Eastern Dimension of America's New European Allies.  Carlisle, PA, Army War College.  Strategic Studies Institute, October 2007.  185 p.
Belarus, Moldova, Ukraine, and Georgia face serious obstacles to their Euro-Atlantic integration, including internal political divisions, Moscow's resistance to further NATO and EU expansion, and the hesitation of EU and Allied capitals in offering clear membership prospects.  Specific discussion of Georgia appears on pages 111-116.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA473997
Book call no.:  355.031091821 B931e

Curtis, Glenn E.  Involvement of Russian Organized Crime Syndicates, Criminal Elements in the Russian Military, and Regional Terrorist Groups in Narcotics Trafficking in Central Asia, the Caucasus, and Chechnya.  Washington, Federal Research Division, Library of Congress, October 2002.  36 p.
Describes the current status of narcotics trafficking in four countries of Central Asia (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan), in the three former Soviet republics of the south Caucasus (Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia), and in Chechnya. Reveals the role of Russian organized crime and Central Asian terrorist organizations.
Also available online at:  http://www.loc.gov/rr/frd/pdf-files/RussianOrgCrime.pdf
Book call no.:  364.1060947 C978i

Dryzek, John S. and Holmes, Leslie Templeman.  Post-Communist Democratization:  Political Discourses across Thirteen Countries.  New York, Cambridge University Press, 2002.  300 p.
Includes chapters on Armenia, pp 133-146 and Georgia, pp 147-157.
Book call no.:  320.947 D811p

Eastern Europe, Russia and Central Asia, 2008.  London, Europa Publications, 2007.  758 p.
Georgia, pp 165-211.  Includes a chronology, historical background, economic information, a statistical survey, and a bibliography.  Also covers the autonomous territories:  Abkhazia, South Ossetia and Adjara.
Book call no.:  R 947 E13b 8th ed. 2008

German, Tracey C.  Faultline or Foothold?  Georgia's Relations with Russia and the USA.  Camberley, Surrey, Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, Conflict Studies Research Centre, January 2004.  14 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.da.mod.uk/colleges/csrc/document-listings/caucasus/P41
Book call no.:  327.4758 G373f

Goltz, Thomas.  Georgia Diary:  A Chronicle of War and Political Chaos in the Post-Soviet Caucasus.  Armonk, NY, Sharpe, 2006.  262 p.
Book call no.:  947.58086 G629g

Jane's Sentinel:  Country Risk Assessments:  Russia and the CIS.  Alexandria, VA, Jane's Information Group, 2007.  788 p.
Georgia, pp 199-314.
Book call no.:  R 947.086 J33 iss. 21 2007

Jane's World Insurgency and Terrorism.  Alexandria, VA, Jane's Information Group, 2007.  676 p.
Abkhazia Separatists, pp 440-444; South Ossetian Separatists, pp 445-448; White Legion and Forest Brothers, pp 449-452.
Book call no.:  R 364.1 J33 iss. 26 2007

Kilroy, Austin.  Promoting Stability on Europe's Borders:  A Comparative Study of Kosovo, Transdniestria and Abkhazia.  Watchfield, Swindon, Conflict Studies Research Centre, Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, August 2006.  28 p.
Motivated by economic gain and a desire for political influence over Moldova and Georgia, Russia's interests are aligned more with the continuation of the Abkhazia and Transdniestrian conflicts than with their resolution.  Russian fears of a zero-sum game with Europe have actually been fulfilled by their own blunt policies and pressures, and Moldova and Georgia have been attracted by Europe instead.
Also available online at:  http://www.defac.ac.uk/colleges/csrc/document-listings/special/06%2838%29AK.pdf
Book call no.:  320.947 K48p

Lynch, Dov.  Engaging Eurasia's Separatist States:  Unresolved Conflicts and De Facto States.  Washington, United States Institute of Peace Press, 2004.  170 p.
"In the wake of the dissolution of the Soviet Union, secessionist forces carved four de facto states from parts of Moldova, Georgia, and Azerbaijan.  Ten years on, those states are mired in uncertainty.  Beset by internal problems, fearful of a return to the violence that spawned them, and isolated and unrecognized internationally, they survive behind cease-fire lines that have temporarily frozen but not resolved their conflicts with the metropolitan powers."  Author examines the political, military, and economic dynamics - both internal and external - that drive the existence of South Ossetia, Abkhazia, Transnistria, and Nagorno-Karabakh.
Book call no.:  320.947 L9871e

Lynch, Dov.  Why Georgia Matters.  Paris, Institute for Security Studies, European Union, February 2006.  92 p.  (Chaillot paper, No. 86)
Explores the EU's relationship with Georgia and evaluates the stakes that the EU has in the country.  The future enlargement of the EU to Romania and Bulgaria will bring the Union into direct proximity with Georgia, which lies on the eastern shores of the Black Sea.
Also available online at: http://www.iss.europa.eu/uploads/media/chai86.pdf
Book call no.:  327.404758 L987w

Russia:  Re-Emerging Great Power, edited by Roger E. Kanet.  New York, Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.  229 p.
Chapter 5:  Putin's Attempts to Subjugate Georgia:  From Sabre-Rattling to the Power of the Purse, by Bertil Nygren, pp 107-123.
Book call no.:  320.947 R9693

Security Sector Reform and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding, edited by Albrecht Schnabel and Hans-Georg Ehrhart.  New York, United Nations University Press, 2005.  329 p.
Civil-Military Relations and Security Sector Reform in a Newly Independent Transitional State:  The Georgian Case, by David Darchiashvili, pp 156-181.
Book call no.:  327.172 S4461


Documents

Barnovi, Andro.  Russian Stance in the Caucasus and the National Security Strategy of Georgia.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, June 2005.  110 p.
Attempts to define the possible objectives, strategies, and means that Georgia can use to achieve full independence from Russia, exercise sovereignty over its own territory; and provide conditions for the prosperous development of the country and its population.  Suggests that Tbilisi must develop closer relations with the United States as the initial step to independence, but also must develop close regional alliances that would enable Georgia to become a relatively independent player over time.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA435481
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42525 B2622r

Bartz, William J.  US Strategic Interests in Georgia.  Carlisle Barracks, PA, Army War College, 2005.  20 p.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39080-537 B994u

Nadirashvili, Zakaria V.  Georgian Light Infantry Battalions in the Global War on Terrorism.  Fort Leavenworth, KS, Army Command and General Staff College, 2005.  110 p.
Examines how prepared Georgian Light Infantry Battalions are to meet the challenges of operations in urban environments.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA437043
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022 N136g

Papava, David Z.  Russia's National Interests Toward the Caucasus:  Implications for Georgian Sovereignty.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, June 2004.  85 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA424691
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42525 P213r


Periodicals

Aitken, Jonathan.  Georgias on My Mind.  American Spectator 40:50-51 October 2007.
Presents the author's impressions of Georgia, a pro-Western nation that has angered Russia with its support of the US-led invasion of Iraq and open courting of NATO membership.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=26750320&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Broers, Laurence.  After the 'Revolution':  Civil Society and the Challenges of Consolidating Democracy in Georgia.  Central Asian Survey 24:333-350 September 2005.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=19114372&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Clements, Matthew.  Azerbaijan and Georgia Seek Energy Autonomy from Russia.  Jane's Intelligence Review 19:5 February 2007.

Clements, Matthew.  Tensions Escalate Between Georgia and South Ossetia.  Jane's Intelligence Review 19:5 May 2007.
South Ossetia is a former autonomous region of Georgia backed by Russia.

Crandall, Maureen S.  Low Grades for Petro-States in the Former Soviet Union.  Journal of Third World Studies 24:189-210 Spring 2007.
Evaluates the economic, social, and political progress of Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.  Also discusses the militarization of the region and the potential for conflict.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=25326037&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Europe:  Jaw-Jaw under Threat; Russia and Georgia.  Economist 378:42 February 25, 2006.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=994268231&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Fiorenza, Nicholas.  Georgia Aims to Start NATO Membership Talks by Early 2008.  Jane's Defence Weekly 44:6 March 7, 2007.

Freese, Theresa.  A Report from the Field:  Georgia's War Against Contraband and Its Struggle for Territorial Integrity.  SAIS Review 25:107-121 Winter 2005.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=839607211&sid=1&Fmt=4&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Future Scenarios.  Jane's Intelligence Review 19:31-33 September 2007.
Examines various scenarios that could result from military conflicts in South Ossetia, Georgia.

Galeotti, Mark.  Republic of Crime:  Separatist Regions and Smuggling in Georgia.  Jane's Intelligence Review 19:48-51 May 2007.
The South Ossetian region has emerged as the unlikely base for a $23 million currency-counterfeiting operation.  Article discusses how separatist regions within Georgia have become havens for transnational organized crime.

Georgia's Striving Muslims.  Jane's Islamic Affairs Analyst, pp 15-16, August 2006.

Hammick, Denise.  Russia Denies Georgian Attack.  Jane's Defence Weekly 44:11 August 15, 2007.
Reports on Moscow's denial of claims that Russian aircraft launched an air-to-surface missile at Georgian territory on August 6, 2007.

Holding It Together.  Jane's Intelligence Review 19:26-30 September 2007.
Examines Georgia's future, in light of its separatist movements and its poor relations with Russia.  Discusses the risks of possible military conflicts with the Russian army.

Holding It Together:  The Way Ahead for Georgia.  Jane's Intelligence Review 19:26-33 September 2007.
Georgia's stability is improving, but significant issues remain with separatist regions and its relationship with Russia.

Intensified Dialogue with Georgia.  NATO's Nations and Partners for Peace 51:161-162 November 2006.
Reports on the decision of the Secretary General of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization to offer Intensified Dialogue to the government of Georgia in 2006.  Because of the said decision, Georgia was given access to an intense political exchange with NATO Allies on its membership aspirations and relevant reforms.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&AN=23975802&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Jakopovich, Dan.  The 2003 “Rose Revolution” in Georgia:  A Case Study in High Politics and Rank-and-File Execution.  Debatte 15:211-220 August 2007.
Also available online at:  http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/cdeb/2007/00000015/00000002/art00006

Kramer, Andrew E.  Russia on Its Mind, Georgia Flexes Its Muscle in Iraq.  New York Times, p A12, October 9, 2007.
At a time when other countries are pulling troops out, Georgia has more than doubled its troop levels in Iraq, to 2,000 soldiers from 850, and agreed to send them from the safer Green Zone in Baghdad to this area along the Iranian border.  That gives Georgia the second-largest troop presence among American allies in Iraq, behind Britain.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1360778391&sid=3&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Kupatadze, Alexander.  Georgian Organised Crime Groups Spread in Europe.  Jane's Intelligence Review 18:42-45 April 2007.

Lapidus, Gail W.  Between Assertiveness and Insecurity:  Russian Elite Attitudes and the Russia-Georgia Crisis.  Post-Soviet Affairs 23:138-155 April-June 2007.
Also available online at:  http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bell/soviet/2007/00000023/00000002/art00003

Larrabee, F. Stephen.  Ukraine and the West.  Survival 48:93-110 Spring 2006.
Unlike his predecessor, Ukrainian president Victor Yushchenko is genuinely committed to Ukraine's integration into the EU and NATO.  This would dramatically change the political map of Europe and could have a catalytic effect on the region, reinforcing the Western orientation of Georgia and Moldova.
Also available online at:  http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=0039%2d6338&volume=48&issue=1&spage=93

Mason, Whit.  Trouble in Tbilisi.  National Interest No. 79:139-144 Spring 2005.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=16575654&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Mchedlishvili, Niko.  NATO to Hasten Georgia Radar Link.  Washington Post, p A12, August 24, 2007.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1324926521&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Mitchell, Lincoln A.  Democracy in Georgia since the Rose Revolution.  Orbis 50:669-676 Fall 2006.

Nixey, James.  Feeling the Heat.  World Today 62:21-22 December 2006.
Describes Russia's relations with Georgia as the worst relationship between Russia and any other former Soviet state since the fall of communism.  Conflicts include the doubling of the price of gas that Russia sells to Georgia, and the banning of Georgian imports into Russia.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1186638511&sid=2&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Papava, Vladimer.  The Political Economy of Georgia's Rose Revolution.  Orbis 50:657-667 Fall 2006.

Papava, Vladimer and Tokmazishvili, Michael.  Becoming European:  Georgia's Strategy for Joining the EU.  Problems of Post-Communism 53:26-32 January-February 2006.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=19527586&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Tocci, Nathalie.  EU Neglect and Competing Mediation in Georgia's Conflicts.  International Spectator 41:69-83 October-December 2006.
Assesses the impact and influence of EU policies in the South Caucasus, and in particular their effectiveness in contributing to a resolution of the Abkhaz and South Ossetian conflicts.

Traughber, Colleen M.  Terror-Crime Nexus?  Terrorism and Arms, Drug, and Human Trafficking in Georgia.  Connections:  The Quarterly Journal 6:47-63 Spring 2007.
Also available online at:  http://www.ciaonet.org/olj/co/co_spring2007/co_spring2007_d_traughber.pdf

Tudoroiu, Theodor.  Rose, Orange, and Tulip:  The Failed Post-Soviet Revolutions.  Communist and Post-Communist Studies 40:315-342 September 2007.
Georgia's Rose Revolution (2003), pp 319-325.

Welt, Cory.  Political Change and Border Security Reform in Eurasia:  The Case of Georgia.  Nonproliferation Review 12:503-537 November 2005.
Article presents four challenges to promoting border security in post-Soviet Eurasia, even in those states that have experienced regime change and profess new interest in constructing sound state institutions.  The analysis is drawn from the specific example of Georgia - a major recipient of U.S. border security assistance and the site of several intercepted efforts of radioactive materials trafficking - but it is relevant to other states in the region, as well.
Also available online at:  http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1073%2d6700&volume=12&issue=3&spage=503

Wheeler, Kurtis and Stillings, Kris.  In the Republic of Georgia.  Marine Corps Gazette 90:48-51 October 2006 .
Discusses the Marine Corps' Georgia Train and Equip Program (GTEP). The GTEP's purpose is to enhance the capability of chosen Georgian military units to provide stability and security to Georgia and the Caucasus area.  The GTEP includes combat skills, first aid, land navigation, human rights education, and communications.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1149245791&sid=1&Fmt=4&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD


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