INTELLIGENCE
Special Bibliography  No. 326

October 2005

Compiled by Bibliography Branch
Muir S. Fairchild Research Information Center
Maxwell AFB, AL


Contents

Internet Resources
General Information
United States
   CIA
   FBI
   Intelligence Reform
   Military Intelligence
Geographic Areas - Intelligence
   Asia
   European Union
   Great Britain
   Israel
   Mexico
   NATO
   Russia

   Intelligence Gathering Methods
   Artificial Intelligence
   CI
   HUMINT
   IMINT
   Intelligence Analysis
   ISR
   Interrogation
   Network Centric Warfare
   OSINT
   SIGINT
   Strategic Intelligence
   TECHINT
   UAVs
History of Intelligence
War on Terror
Homeland Defense
Iraq War 2003
Persian Gulf War, 1991
Personal Narratives

The appearance of hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Air Force of this Web site or the information, products, or services contained therein. For other than authorized activities such as military exchanges and morale, welfare and recreation sites, the U.S. Air Force does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at these locations. Such links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of this DoD Web site. 

Some materials listed below require access to subscription databases.  If you cannot gain access, contact your local library for availability. AU students and faculty can contact  AUL's  Web Maintainer for a password.

All sites listed were last accessed October 19, 2005.


Internet Resources


Agency Group 09. Intelligence Community Facing Challenges with Human Intel. FDCH Regulatory Intelligence Database May 18, 2005.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&an=32W3440302020

Air Intelligence Agency.
Available online at: http://aia.lackland.af.mil/homepages/pa/missionvision.cfm

Backgrounder: List of US Intelligence Agencies.  April 16, 2004.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/direct.asp?an=2W81968697455&db=buh

Central Intelligence Agency.
Available online at: http://www.cia.gov/
About the CIA, their vision, mission and values.

Defense Intelligence Agency.
Available online at: http://www.dia.mil/
Gives the mission, vision, and values of the DIA.

Federal Bureau of Investigation.
Available online at: http://www.fbi.gov/
General news about the FBI, their organization and mission.

Federation of American Scientists. Intelligence Programs and Systems
Available online at: http://www.fas.org/irp/program/index.html
An alphabetical listing of all the intel programs profiled on this site.

Headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps Intelligence Department.
Available online at: http://hqinet001.hqmc.usmc.mil/DirInt/default.html
Details mission and organization of Marine Corps intelligence.

National Geospatial Intelligence Agency.
Available online at: http://www.nga.mil/portal/site/nga01
Provides information about the NGA mission and current hot projects.

National Reconnaissance Office.
Available online at: http://www.nro.gov/
Gives NRO vision and mission and current projects.

National Security Agency/Central Security Service (NSA/CSS).
Available online at: http://www.nsa.gov/home_html.cfm

Office of Naval Intelligence.
Available online at: http://www.nmic.navy.mil/

Office of the Director of National Intelligence.
Available online at: http://www.dni.gov/
Summarizes the mission of the ODNI.

U.S. Air Force Intelligence.
Available online at: http://www.intelligence.gov/1-members_airforce.shtml

U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command.
Available online at: http://www.inscom.army.mil/


General Information


Books

Encyclopedia of Intelligence and Counterintelligence, edited by Rodney P. Carlisle. Armonk, NY, M. E. Sharpe, Inc, 2004. 2 vols.
Book call no.: R 327.1203 E561

Hastedt, Glenn. Espionage: A Reference Handbook. Santa Barbara, CA, ABC-CLIO, Inc, 2003.     225 p.
Book call no.: 327.12 H356e

Intelligence Professionalism in the Americas, edited by Russell G. Swenson and Susana C. Lemozy. With a foreword/prologo by Michael Herman. Washington, Joint Military Intelligence College, Center for Strategic Intelligence Research, 2004. 572 p.
Book call no.: 355.3432 I614 2004

Johansson, G. D. Spytalk: The Language of Terror: An Encyclopedic Glossary of Words, Terms, Phrases and Explanations Used in International Intelligence. Houston, TX, St. Ambrose Press, 2002. 350 p.
Book call no.: 327.1203 J65s

Johnson, Rob. Analytic Culture in the U.S. Intelligence Community: An Ethnographic Study. Washington, Central Intelligence Agency, 2005. 161 p.
Book call no.: 353.170973 J73a

Lowenthal, Mark M. Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy. Washington, CQ Press, 2003. 274 p.
Book call no.: 327.1273 L917i

Mahl, Tom E. Espionage's Most Wanted: The Top 10 Book of Malicious Moles, Blown Covers, and Intelligence Oddities. Washington, Brassey's, Inc., 2003. 300 p.
Book call no.: 327.12 M214e

Rustmann, F. W. Espionage and the Craft of Business Intelligence. Washington, Brassey's, 2002. 217 p.
Book call no.: 658.47 R971c

Shulsky, Abaram N. and Schmitt, Gary J. Silent Warfare: Understanding the World of Intelligence. Washington, Brassey's, 2002. 247 p.
Book call no.: 327.12 S562s 2002

Sibley, Katherine A. S. Red Spies in America: Stolen Secrets and the Dawn of the Cold War. Lawrence, KS, University Press of Kansas, 2004. 370 p.
Book call no.: 327.1247073 S564r

Steele, Robert D. On Intelligence: Spies and Secrecy in an Open World. Fairfax, VA, AFCEA International Press, 2000. 495 p.
Book call no.: 327.120973 S814o

Trahair, R. C. S. Encyclopedia of Cold War Espionage, Spies, and Secret Operations. Westport, CN, Greenwood Press, 2004. 472 p.
Book call no.: R 327.1209 T765e

Turner, Michael A. Why Secret Intelligence Fails. Dulles, VA, Potomac Books, Inc, 2005. 217 p.
Book call no.: 327.1273 T949w

United States Commission on the Intelligence Capabilities of the United States Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction. Report to the President of the United States. Washington, Commission on the Intelligence Capabilities of the United States Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction, 2005. 601 p.
Also available online at: http://purl.access.gpo.gov/GPO/LPS59410
Book call no.: 327.1273 U584r pt.2


CIA


Books

Ashley, Clarence. CIA Spy Master. Gretna, LA, Pelican Publishing Company, 2004. 350 p.
Book call no.: 327.12730092 A826c

Hitz, Frederick Porter. The Great Game: The Myth and Reality of Espionage. New York, Alfred A. Knopf, 2004. 211 p.
Book call no.: 823.087 H676g

Inside CIA's Private World: Declassified Articles from the Agency's Internal Journal, 1955-1992, selected and edited by H. Bradford Westerfield. New Haven, CT, Yale University Press, 1995. 489 p.
Book call no.: 327.120973 I59

Kessler, Ronald. The CIA at War: Inside the Secret Campaign Against Terror. New York, St. Martin's Press, 2003. 362 p.
Book call no.: 973.931 K22c

Richelson, Jeffrey. The U.S. Intelligence Community. Boulder, CO, Westview Press, 1999. 526 p.
Book call no.: 327.120973 R528u

Sullivan, John F. Of Spies and Lies: A CIA Lie Detector Remembers Vietnam. Lawrence, KS, University Press of Kansas, 2002. 250 p.
Book call no.: 959.70438 S949o

Taubman, Philip. Secret Empire: Eisenhower, the CIA, and the Hidden Story of America's Space Espionage. New York, Simon & Schuster, 2003. 441 p.
Book call no.: 327.1273 T222s

United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Intelligence. Nomination of the Honorable Porter J. Goss to be Director of Central Intelligence. Hearings. 108th Congress, 2nd session, September 14 and 20, 2004. Washington, GPO, 2005. 207 p.
Book call no.: 353.170973 U58nb

Periodicals

Frank, Mitch. 4 Dots American Intelligence Failed to Connect. Time 163:30-31 April 26, 2004.
Discusses four crucial cases where mishandled intelligence, bureaucratic confusion and legal hurdles blinded the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency and Federal Bureau of Investigation to clues leading to the September 11, 2001 attacks. Conspiracy of al-Qaeda members in Manila, the Philippines, led by Ramzi Yousef, to blow up airplanes; Meeting in Malaysia between two 9/11 hijackers; Memo that was sent to the FBI by Phoenix, Arizona agent Kenneth Williams; Flight training of Frenchman Zacarias Moussaoui.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/direct.asp?an=12845765&db=aph

Gorman, Siobhan. Wanted: Spy Chief. National Journal 36:1842-1849 June 12, 2004.
Reports on the need of the U.S. Central Intelligence agency for a person who will run the nation's intelligence efforts following the resignation of central intelligence director George Tenet. Role of the agency in the nation; Job responsibility of a Director of National Intelligence (DNI); Nominees for DNI.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=cookie,ip,url,uid&db=aph&an=13537587

Hosenball, Mark and Wolffe, Richard. The CIA vs the DIA. Newsweek 143:8 April 19, 2004.
Examines the claims and counterclaims between the United States Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and the Pentagon's Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) regarding faulty military intelligence that was the key to U.S. President George W. Bush's case for going to war with Iraq. Evidence provided by an Iraqi source about mobile biological weapons laboratories and factories; Involvement of the German intelligence service; How Colin Powell used the information provided by the informant.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/direct.asp?an=12796965&db=aph

Johnston, David and Dwyer, Jim. Pre-9/11 Files Show Warnings Were More Dire and Persistent. New York Times, p1, Op, April 18, 2004.
Discusses how the hearings of the September 11 commission and its preliminary findings have made clear that Osama bin Laden and Al Qaeda were a threat that was recognized and discussed at the highest levels of the U.S. government. Suggestion by some commission members that the attacks could have been prevented; Political implications of the examination; Focus on previously classified information given to two presidents, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, and their senior advisors; Overview of the findings, including missed opportunities amid a stream of warnings; Ways that the attacks might have been prevented; Counterterrorism approaches of the Central Intelligence Agency and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Powers, Thomas. The Failure. New York Review of Books 51:4-6 April 29, 2004.
Focuses on the crisis facing the United States Central Intelligence Agency as the result of a White House-directed campaign to justify the overthrow of Iraq President Saddam Hussein by citing intelligence reports of Iraqi stockpiles of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and accelerating programs to build more. Failure of the CIA team to find any WMD stockpiles in Iraq; Challenges facing the Senate investigating committee on explaining how the evidence of Iraqi WMD was used by President George W. Bush and his advisers to launch an urgent war against Iraq.

Risen, James. How Pair's Finding on Terror Led to Clash on Shaping Intelligence. New York Times, pA1, Op, April 28, 2004.
Examines how a two-man U.S. Pentagon intelligence unit created after September 11, 2001, reported an increasingly unified Islamic terrorist threat and links between Iraq and Al Qaeda. Efforts of Michael Maloof and Douglas J. Feith Defense Intelligence Agency to track links between terrorists and host countries; Warning that ethnic, religious and political divides between terrorist groups were breaking down; Controversy over their findings; Investigation by the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence whether the unit exaggerated the threat posed by Iraq to justify the war; Contention of other intelligence agencies that they found little evidence to support the group's findings; Resistance from the Central Intelligence Agency and the Defense Intelligence Agency to the unit; The team's briefing for Paul D. Wolfowitz, deputy secretary of defense; Questions over the terrorism link.


FBI


Books

Cunningham, David. There's Something Happening Here: The New Left, the Klan, and FBI Counterintelligence. Berkeley, CA, University of California Press, 2004. 366 p.
Book call no.: 363.25931 C973t

Richelson, Jeffrey. The U.S. Intelligence Community. Boulder, CO, Westview Press, 1999. 526 p.
Book call no.: 327.120973 R528u

Smith, I. C. Inside: A Top G-Man Exposes Spies, Lies, and Bureaucratic Bungling Inside the FBI. Nashville, TN, Nelson Current, 2004. 304 p.
Book call no.: 363.250973 S649i

Periodicals

Frank, Mitch. 4 Dots American Intelligence Failed to Connect. Time 163:30-31 April 26, 2004.
Discusses four crucial cases where mishandled intelligence, bureaucratic confusion and legal hurdles blinded the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency and Federal Bureau of Investigation to clues leading to the September 11, 2001 attacks. Conspiracy of al-Qaeda members in Manila, the Philippines, led by Ramzi Yousef, to blow up airplanes; Meeting in Malaysia between two 9/11 hijackers; Memo that was sent to the FBI by Phoenix, Arizona agent Kenneth Williams; Flight training of Frenchman Zacarias Moussaoui.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/direct.asp?an=12845765&db=aph

Johnston, David and Dwyer, Jim. Pre-9/11 Files Show Warnings Were More Dire and Persistent. New York Times, p1, Op, April 18, 2004.
Discusses how the hearings of the September 11 commission and its preliminary findings have made clear that Osama bin Laden and Al Qaeda were a threat that was recognized and discussed at the highest levels of the U.S. government. Suggestion by some commission members that the attacks could have been prevented; Political implications of the examination; Focus on previously classified information given to two presidents, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, and their senior advisors; Overview of the findings, including missed opportunities amid a stream of warnings; Ways that the attacks might have been prevented; Counterterrorism approaches of the Central Intelligence Agency and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Risen, James. How Pair's Finding on Terror Led to Clash on Shaping Intelligence. New York Times, pA1, Op, April 28, 2004.
Examines how a two-man U.S. Pentagon intelligence unit created after September 11, 2001, reported an increasingly unified Islamic terrorist threat and links between Iraq and Al Qaeda. Efforts of Michael Maloof and Douglas J. Feith Defense Intelligence Agency to track links between terrorists and host countries; Warning that ethnic, religious and political divides between terrorist groups were breaking down; Controversy over their findings; Investigation by the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence whether the unit exaggerated the threat posed by Iraq to justify the war; Contention of other intelligence agencies that they found little evidence to support the group's findings; Resistance from the Central Intelligence Agency and the Defense Intelligence Agency to the unit; The team's briefing for Paul D. Wolfowitz, deputy secretary of defense; Questions over the terrorism link.


Intelligence Reform


Internet Resources

Andrew, Christopher. Intelligence, International Relations and 'Under-Theorisation'. Intelligence & National Security 19:170-184 Summer 2004.
Available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&an=15329104
This article submits that the conceptual framework within which intelligence is studied must continue to evolve and adapt to the new conditions of the early twenty-first century. As more intelligence and intelligence related material than ever before enters the public domain, scholars of international relations must take into greater account study of the role of intelligence. Despite its obvious importance to the course of the Cold War, for example, most accounts of the Cold War tend to ignore or downplay the importance of signals intelligence in particular. Intelligence, moreover, is all but absent in most contemporary international relations theory. The essay argues that intelligence should be placed closer to the centre of new interpretations of both the course of the Cold War and of the political dynamics of authoritarian states. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR].

Chambliss, Saxby. Chambliss Calls for Improved Intelligence Collection and Analysis. FDCH Press Releases July 21, 2004.
Available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&an=32X0952637317

Books

Bringing Intelligence About: Practitioners Reflect on Best Practices, with a foreword by Mark M. Lowenthal and edited by Russell G. Swenson. Washington, Center for Strategic Intelligence Research, Joint Military Intelligence College, May 2003. 145 p.
Book call no.: 355.3432 B858

Intelligence and Policy: The Evolving Relationship. Washington, Center for the Study of Intelligence , Central Intelligence Agency, June 2004. 17 p.
"The roundtable ... took place on 10 November 2003 at Georgetown University."
Also available online at: http://www.cia.gov/csi/books/Roundtable_june2004/IntelandPolicyRelationship_Internet.pdf
Book call no.: 355.3432 I613

Intelligence for a New Era in American Foreign Policy. Washington, Central Intelligence Agency, 2004. 21 p.
Center for the Study of Intelligence Conference Report 10-11 September 2003 Charlottesville, Virginia.
Book call no.: 327.1273 I61

National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States. The 9/11 Commission Report. Executive Summary. Washington, National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, 2004. 26 p.
Also available online at: http://a257.g.akamaitech.net/7/257/2422/22jul20041147/www.gpoaccess.gov/911/pdf/execsummary.pdf
Book call no.: R 973.931 N277n exec.sum.

National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States. The 9/11 Commission Report: Final Report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States. Washington, National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States: GPO, 2004. 567 p.
Also available online at: http://purl.access.gpo.gov/GPO/LPS51934
Book call no.: 973.931 N277n

Odom, William E. Fixing Intelligence for a More Secure America. New Haven, CT, Yale University Press, 2004. 230 p.
Book call no.: 355.34320973 O25f 2004

Pateman, Roy. Residual Uncertainty: Trying to Avoid Intelligence and Policy Mistakes in the Modern World. Lanham, MD, University Press of America, 2003. 266 p.
Book call no.: 327.12 P295r

Powers, Richard Gid. Broken: The Troubled Past and Uncertain Future of the FBI. New York, Free Press, 2004. 515 p.
Book call no.: 363.250973 P888b

Transforming Reserve Component Intelligence: Conference Proceedings, June 5, 2003. Washington, Joint Military Intelligence College, 2004. 84 p.
Book call no.: 355.3432 T772

United States. Congress. House. Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005. Report. 108th Congress. 2nd session, June 21, 2004. Washington, GPO, 2005. 75 p.
Book call no.: 353.170973 U581ia 2005

United States. Congress, Senate. Select Committee on Intelligence. Intelligence Community Reform. Hearing. 108th Congress, 2nd session, July 20, 2004. Washington, GPO, 2004. 79 p.
Book call no.: 327.1273 U583i

United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Intelligence. House. Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. Joint Inquiry into Intelligence Community Activities Before and After the Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001. Hearings. 107th Congress, September 18, 19, 20, 24, 26, 2002. Washington, GPO, 2004. 2 vols.
Book call no.: 327.1273 U583ja

United States. Department of Justice. Office of the Inspector General Audit Division. The Internal Effects of the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Reprioritization. Washington, Dept. of Justice, September 2004. 137 p.
Audit Report 04-39.
Also available online at: http://www.usdoj.gov/oig/reports/FBI/a0439/final.pdf

Book call no.: 363.250973 I61

Documents

Gleghorn, Todd E. Exposing the Seams: The Impetus for Reforming U.S. Counterintelligence. Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2003. 92 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA418554
Doc. call no.: M-U 42525 G555e

Mihm, J. Christopher. Intelligence Reform: Human Capital Considerations Critical to 9/11 Commission's Proposed Reforms: Testimony Before the Subcommittee on Oversight of Government Management, the Federal Workforce, and the District of Columbia, Committee on Governmental Affairs, U.S. Senate. Washington, GAO, 2004. 18 p.
Also available online at: http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d041084t.pdf

Doc. call no.: M-P 41026-173 no. 04-1084T

O'Connor, Jon Anthony. Navy and Marine Corps Intelligence Integration. Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2004. 55 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA427198
Doc. call no.: M-P 42525 O183n

Storey, Bradley J. Organizational Change for the Intelligence Community Supporting Maritime Homeland Security and Defense: Developing a Domestic Maritime Intelligence Network. Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2003. 39 p.
"The missions of Maritime Homeland Security and Defense have gained significant importance in the overall national security of the United States. In order to effectively support these missions, an effective intelligence apparatus must exist which is adapted to the Information Age. Terrorist groups are using the network forms of organization, with significant advantages over traditional hierarchies within the U.S. government. Effectively organizing the various agencies involved in domestic maritime intelligence will require rapid movement of intelligence to the operational customer. The most effective way to organize these agencies to support Maritime Homeland Security and Defense is to create a domestic maritime intelligence network."
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA418277
Doc. call no.: M-U 42525 S884o

Periodicals

Aaron, Chris and Gilad, Ben. Learning From the Military. Jane's Intelligence Review 13:50-51 December 2001.

AFCEA Intelligence Committee. Intelligence and the New National Security Environment - Industry's View. Defense Intelligence Journal 13:17-38 2005.

Aldrich, Richard J. Intelligence Test. Foreign Policy 134:98-100 January-February 2003.
Focuses on an article by Carmen A. Medina in 'Studies in Intelligence,' which asks whether the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency's (CIA) model of intelligence analysis is failing. Argument for a revolutionary overhaul; Implications of the growing availability of so-called open-source intelligence; Challenges to the CIA's Directorate of Intelligence (DI); Response to the article by DI officer Steven R. Ward; The slow pace of changes in U.S. intelligence.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=8786233

Alexander, Keith B. Transforming Army Intelligence While at War. Army 54:127+ October 2004.

Army Aims to Revolutionize Intelligence Process. Signal 58:23-26 October 2003.

Barger, Deborah G. It is Time to Transform, Not Reform, U.S. Intelligence. SAIS Review 24:23-31 Winter-Spring 2004.

Barlow, John Perry. Why Spy? Forbes 170:42-48 October 7, 2002.
Criticizes the U.S. intelligence community for its failure to detect or prevent the terrorist events of September 11, 2001. Cost of intelligence; Opinion that the intelligence system is broken beyond repair, self-protective beyond reform, and permanently fixated on a world that no longer exists; Open source intelligence; Use of the Internet; Actions of members of the Central Intelligence Agency; Lack of communication between intelligence agencies; Outdated technology; Secrecy; Effects of the administration of President Bill Clinton.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=7390162

Bender, Bryan. Briefing: US Intelligence Reform. Jane's Defence Weekly 38:24-27 October 23, 2002.

Betts, Richard K. The New Politics of Intelligence. Foreign Affairs 83:2-9 May-June 2004.
The article discusses opportunities and danger of putting intelligence issues on the political platforms of U.S. presidential candidates in 2004.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=cookie,ip,url,uid&db=aph&an=12845777

Clift, A. Denis. Through the Prism of National Security: The Challenge of Intelligence Sharing. Defense Intelligence Journal 11:97-104 Winter 2002.

Corera, Gordon. Radical Reform Required in US Intelligence Community. Jane's Intelligence Review 16:42-47 April 2004.

Corera, Gordon. US Reforms Overlook Threat From Foreign Intelligence. Jane's Intelligence Review 15:44-47 June 2003.

Crossman, Walter J. Upcoming Changes in MI (Military Intelligence) Occupational Specialities. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 30:10-11 April-June 2004.
Discusses the upcoming changes in Military Intelligence Occupational Specialties in the U.S. Army to be implemented in October 2005. Changes in Career Management Field (CMF) 98 and 96; Significance of the CMF changes; Information on the deleted military occupational specialties.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=14165386

Duffy, Michael. How to Fix our Intelligence. Time 163:26-31 April 26, 2004.
Focuses on the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), in light of the preliminary findings by the September 11 Commission. Question of whether the agencies and the President George W. Bush administration are willing to change; History of the FBI; Changes that are being made by Bush; Overview of intelligence failures; Background on the CIA; Outlook for reform.

Erwin, Sandra I. New Intelligence Office Must Fix Information Breakdowns. National Defense 87:32-33 March 2003.

Gorman, Siobhan. Intelligence Reform Gathers Momentum. National Journal 36:2727 September 11, 2004.
Reports on the topics discussed in a bipartisan meeting in the U.S. Congress on September 8, 2004. Promises of U.S. President George W. Bush to the 9/11 Commission; Comments from Senators Joe Lieberman and John McCain on the promises of Bush for the commission; Developments in the commission.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=cookie,ip,url,uid&db=aph&an=14587058

Gorman, Siobhan. The Survivor. National Journal 36:2466-2471 August 21, 2004.
"FBI Director Mueller has skillfully kept the Bureau in charge of its post-9/11 makeover, but can he forge it into an anti-terrorist dynamo?"

Gorman, Siobhan and Cohen, Richard E. Hurtling Toward an Intelligence Overhaul. National Journal 36:2807-2810 September 18, 2004.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=cookie,ip,url,uid&db=aph&an=14682410

Gorman, Siobhan and Freedberg, Sydney J. Carter and Turner on Intelligence Reform. National Journal 36:3080-3082 October 9, 2004.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=cookie,ip,url,uid&db=aph&an=14809861

Hirsh, Michael and Hosenball, Mark. Tenet and the CIA: A Survivor's Troubles. Newsweek 143:5 April 26, 2004.
Presents speculation about whether CIA director George Tenet will retire. Discussion of major failures in CIA's intelligence-gathering during Tenet's seven-year tenure, including the failure to stop the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and the failure to accurately assess Iraq's weapons capabilities; Speculation about whether Tenet's position will disappear in a reorganization of U.S. intelligence agencies.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/direct.asp?an=12846847&db=aph

Intelligence: No Easy Fix. Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists 60:17-19 September-October 2004.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=cookie,ip,url,uid&db=aph&an=14155475

Intelligence Reform. Foreign Policy 144:20 September 2004.
The article presents quotations from a variety of people regarding the reform of the United States intelligence community as Foreign Policy dips into its archive for a look at this issue through the years.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=cookie,ip,url,uid&db=aph&an=14275151

Jehl, Douglas. Debate on Secret Program Bursts Into Open. New York Times, p A24, December 10, 2004.

Lahneman, William J. Outsourcing the IC's Stovepipes? International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence 16:573-593 Winter 2003-2004.

Lefebvre, Ste'phane. The Difficulties and Dilemmas of International Intelligence Cooperation. International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence 16:527-542 Winter 2003-2004.

Marrin, Stephen. CIA's Kent School: Improving Training for New Analysts. International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence 16:609-637 Winter 2003-2004.

Pappalardo, Joe. Pentagon Balking at Intel Reform Recommendations. National Defense 89:16-17 October 2004.

Rowley, Coleen. What the FBI Needs - and Doesn't Need. Time 163:33 April 26, 2004.
Comments on the role of the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in preventing terrorism. Importance of useful intelligence; Author's reaction to the suggestion of taking domestic intelligence away from the FBI and giving it to an agency modeled after Britain's M15; Strengths of the FBI, including geographic distribution; Where efforts should be focused to make improvements.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/direct.asp?an=12845769&db=aph

Russell, Kevin. The Subjectivity of Intelligence Analysis and Implications for the U.S. National Security Strategy. SAIS Review 24:147-163 Winter-Spring 2004.

Sanger, David E. Despite Terror Risk, Washington is Unlikely to Press Reform of C.I.A. This Year. New York Times, p 10, July 11, 2004.

Sangillo, Gregg and Gorman, Siobhan. Smarter Intelligence A Post-9/11 Priority. National Journal 36:1572-1578 May 22, 2004.
Profiles several experts who have specialization in intelligence reform in the U.S. Maureen Baginski, executive assistant director of the Office of Intelligence at the Federal Bureau of Investigation; Bruce Berkowitz, a research fellow at Hoover Institution in Stanford University; Jamie Gorelick, member of the 9/11 Commission; Michael Hayden, director of the National Security Agency.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/direct.asp?an=13490174&db=aph

Scully, Megan. U.S. Plans Single Intel Picture for Iraq. Defense News 19:4 February 16, 2004.

Spracher, William C. Homeland Security and Intelligence: Can Oil Mix with Water in an Open Society? Low Intensity Conflict & Law Enforcement 11:29-54 Spring 2002.
Examines the intelligence challenges for homeland security.

Stanton, John J. U.S. Intelligence Community Reaches Crossroads. National Defense 86:12-13 December 2001.

Steele, Robert David. Information Peacekeeping and the Future of Intelligence. International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence 17:265-285 Summer 2004.

Stone, Peter H. Intelligence Failures Dent U.S. Credibility. National Journal 36:732-733 March 6, 2004.

Trim, Peter R. Public and Private Sector Cooperation in Counteracting Cyberterrorism. International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence 16:594-608 Winter 2003-2004.

Turner, Michael A. A Distinctive U.S. Intelligence Identity. International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence 17:42-61 Spring 2004.

Warner, Michael. Intelligence Transformation and Intelligence Liaison. SAIS Review 24:77-89 Winter-Spring 2004.

Wettering, Frederick L. (C)overt Action: The Disappearing "C." International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence 16:561-572 Winter 2003-2004.

Audio Book

National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States. The 9/11 Commission Report [National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States].. Falls Church, VA, Sound Room Publishers: Pocket University, 2004. 22 sound discs.
Book call no.: 973.931 N2772

Video

National Commission on Terrorist Attacks upon the United States. The 9/11 Commission Report. New York, A & E Television Networks, 2004. 1 videodisc (92 ;min.).
Produced by CBS Eye too Productions for History Television Network Productions. "An exhaustive, objective look at the findings of Commission's report, the work that went into it, and the repercussions of its release. Here are the stories of the families who lost loved ones, and of misinterpreted signals and missed opportunities."--Publisher Website.
973.931 N2771


Military Intelligence


Internet Resources

Air Force Print News (March 18, 2005) Predator Fleet to Expand. Defense & AT-L 34:58-60 July-August 2005.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bth&an=17571489

Arnold, Stephen. The Other Intelligent Open Source. Information World Review October 2003.
Available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=11236911
Deals with the emergence of intelligent open source in the information content industry. Reason for the emergence; Distinctions about open source information; Goal of open source intelligence; Model used by most software companies.

Carlucci, Frank C. 9-11 Commission Report: Defense Intelligence Operations. FDCH Congressional Testimony August 16, 2004.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=32Y2940280311

Col. Gary Connor Helps Transform C3ISR Technology. Military & Aerospace Electronics 16:21 April 2005.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=16871744

Federation of American Scientists. Air Force Intelligence and Security Doctrine
Available online at: http://www.fas.org/irp/doddir/usaf/
Lists USAF Doctrine Documents pertaining to Intelligence.

Johnson, Loch K. Spymaster Richard Helms: An Interview with the Former US Director of Central Intelligence. Intelligence & National Security 18:24-44 Autumn 2003.
The former US Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) offered his views on a wide range of intelligence issues. Contrary to conventional wisdom, he argued that members of Congress had maintained rigorous accountability over the secret agencies in the years before the major spy scandal of 1975, when the Central Intelligence Agency was found to have spied on American citizens. He emphasized, too, the vital importance of human (as opposed to technical) intelligence, and expressed cynicism about the effectiveness of large-scale covert actions. For Helms, the DCI's most important job was to bring the facts to the table at high policy meetings.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&an=12353213

McKenna, Ted. Mixed Signals. Journal of Electronic Defense 28:49-55 May 2005.
The article reports that digitization and computers help process an increasingly complex radar, communications emissions. Today locating the source of an electronic or communications signal, through such measurements as time difference of arrival and angle of arrival, is getting increasingly accurate, to the point where coordinates of a signals location can be used to more quickly queue other sensors such as imagery and even weapons systems. Signals intelligence, including both communications intelligence and electronic--typically radar--intelligence is, therefore, becoming as integral a part of network-centric warfare as any other type of intelligence.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17173119

U.S. Army. All Source Analysis System (ASAS) - Warfighter Guide to Intelligence 2000
Available online at: http://www.fas.org/irp/doddir/army/wg2000/part05.htm

United States Army. Field Manual 2-0 Intelligence. May 2004.
Available online at: http://www.fas.org/irp/doddir/army/fm2-0.pdf
FM 2-0 is the Army’s keystone manual for military intelligence (MI) doctrine. It describes: The fundamentals of intelligence operations; The operational environment (OE); Intelligence in unified action: The Intelligence Battlefield Operating System (BOS); Intelligence considerations in strategic readiness; The intelligence process; MI roles and functions within the context of Army operations.

Wilson, J. R. UAVs Poised to Take the Next Step into Combat. Military & Aerospace Electronics June 2005.
Available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17396004
Focuses on the use of new generation of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and unmanned combat aerial vehicles (UCAV) by the U.S. Navy and Air Force. Efficacy of unmanned aerial vehicles during the Persian Gulf War of 1991 and 2003; Difficulties in deploying these aircrafts; Significance of UAV and UCAV for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance or lethal missions.

Books

Ford, Christopher A. The Admirals' Advantage: U.S. Navy Operational Intelligence in World War II and the Cold War. Annapolis, MD, Naval Institute Press, 2005. 219 p.
Book call no.: 359.34320973 F699a

Interoperability: A Continuing Challenge in Coalition Air Operations. Santa Monica, CA, Rand, 2000. p
Book call no.: 358.400941 I61

Jakub, Jay. Spies and Saboteurs: Anglo-American Collaboration and Rivalry in Human Intelligence Collection and Special Operations, 1940-45. New York, St. Martin's Press, 1999. 280 p.
Book call no.: 940.5486 J25a

Mills, Gary H. The Role of Rhetorical Theory in Military Intelligence Analysis: A Soldier's Guide to Rhetorical Theory. Maxwell AFB, AL, Air University Press, 2003. 65 p.
Also available online at: http://www.au.af.mil/au/aul/aupress/fairchild_papers/Mills/Mills.pdf
Book call no.: 358.3432 M657r

National Insecurity: U.S. Intelligence After the Cold War, edited by Craig Eisendrath and foreword by Tom Harkin. Philadelphia, PA, Temple University Press, 2000. 241 p.
Book call no.: 327.127309 N277

Richelson, Jeffrey. The U.S. Intelligence Community. Boulder, CO, Westview Press, 1999. 526 p.
Book call no.: 327.120973 R528u

Strategic Denial and Deception: The Twenty-First Century Challenge, edited by Goodson, Roy and Wirtz, James J. New Brunswick, NJ, Transaction Publishers, 2002. 256 p.
Book call no.: 327.14 S898

Documents

Becker, David W. Coming in From the Cold ... War: Defense HUMINT Services Support to Military Operations Other Than War.. Fort Leavenworth, KS, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, 2000. 73 p.
"This study examines the Defense HUMINT Service (DHS) and the role it plays in supporting Joint Task Forces (JTF) and theater commander in chiefs (CINCs) in military operations other than war (MOOTW)."
Also available online at:
http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA381887
Doc. call no.: M-U 42022 B395c

Clark, Samuel L. Overt HUMINT Debriefing Activities -- A Dichotomy Between Need and Emphasis. Washington, Defense Intelligence School, June 1977. 64 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 42808-12 C585i

Cochran, Lewis C. Human Intelligence: Long-Range Surveillance for Force XXI, A Monograph. Fort Leavenworth, KS, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. School of Advanced Military Studies, January 18, 1996. 52 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 42022-2 C663h

Cook, Paul J. Imagery and Measurement and Signatures Intelligence Support to Military Operations on Urbanized Terrain: A Monograph. Fort Leavenworth, KS, School of Advanced Military Studies, Army Command and General Staff College, 2003. 62 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA419915
Doc. call no.: M-P 42022-2 C771i

Davis, Stephen L. The Space Maneuver Vehicle: Enhancing Space's Utility to the Warfighter. Quantico, VA, United States Marine Corps Command and Staff College, 2002. 44 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA404007
Doc. call no.: M-U 41886-71 D264s

Dilon, Peter J. A Theory for Human Intelligence Operations. Carlisle Barracks, PA, U.S. Army War College, 1999. 45 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 39080-537 D579t

Dymond, John C. Air Force HUMINT: Phoenix or Albatross?. Maxwell AFB, AL, Air War College, 1998. 72 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 43117 D997a

Fletcher, Barbara. Autonomous Vehicles and the Net-Centric Battlespace. San Diego, CA, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, 2002. 1 vol.
"The horrific terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 on the U.S. homeland highlighted the threat that terrorism poses to U.S. national security. DoD operates globally a large network of Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) assets which could be brought to bear in the effort to combat terrorism. The geographic Commander's-in-Chief(CINCs) set the priorities for the intelligence networks in their Areas of Responsibility (AORs) according to their interpretation of the strategic guidance from the National Command Authority (NCA). A key tenet of the new strategic setting is the grave threat to national security posed by terrorism, potentially using Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, or Enhanced High Explosive (CBRNE) weapons. This fact, coupled with the new strategic mandate that sets defense of the homeland as the highest priority for the U.S. military, dictates that each of the geographic CINCs set combatting terrorist use of CBRNE weapons as the highest priority for their intelligence networks. The success or failure of this operational intelligence effort could have major strategic effects."
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA397125
Doc. call no.: M-U 44451-1

Fountoukidis, Dimitrios P. Adaptive Management of Emerging Battlefield Network. Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2004. 96 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA422313
Doc. call no.: M-U 42525 F771a

Goan, Terrance. A Uniform Interface for Active and Intelligent Information Access and Discovery. Rome, NY, Air Force Research Laboratory, Information Directorate, 1998. 21 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 44289-13 1998 no.89

Jackson, Matthew J. Swimming with the Natives: Cultural Immersion and Its Applications for Naval Special Warfare. Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2004. 101 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA427334
Doc. call no.: M-P 42525 J131s

Jackson, Pamela D. Artificial Intelligence's Role in Advancing the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA). Carlisle Barracks, PA, U.S. Army War College, 2002. 34 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA401055
Doc. call no.: M-U 39080-537 J132a

Joint Doctrine for Electronic Warfare. Washington, Joint Chiefs of Staff, 2000. 1 vol.
Joint Publication 3-51.
Also available online at: http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/new%5Fpubs/jp3%5F51.pdf
Doc. call no.: M-U 40592 no. 3-51 2000 Apr. 7

Joint Doctrine for Intelligence Support to Operations. Washington, Joint Chiefs of Staff, 2000. 1 vol.
Doc. call no.: M-U 40592 no. 2-0

Kneafsey, David B. The Combatant Commander and Effective Operational HUMINT: Lessons From the Double Cross System of World War II and the CJ2X of Operation Joint Guard. Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2003. 1 vol.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA420278
Doc. call no.: M-P 41662 K681c

Little, Jody. Application of Virtual User Interfaces for ELINT Analysis. Rome, NY, Rome Laboratory, April 1996. 43 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 43957 no. 96-48

MacDonald, John Scott. Agent Based Computing and Effective Self-Synchronization in Netted Warfare. Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2003. 1 vol.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA415987
Doc. call no.: M-U 41662 M1351a

Marshall, Larry R. Imagery Dissemination: Have We Fixed the Problems of Desert Storm?. Newport, RI, Naval War College, 1998. 25 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 41662 M368i

Mission Need Statement (MNS) for a Counterintelligence and Human Resource Equipment Program (CIHEP). Quantico, VA, United States Marine Corps, March 24, 1994. 1 vol.
Doc. call no.: M-U 42139-57 no. CCC 11.24

Nagle, Homer P. US Army HUMINT Collection -- New Directions. Carlisle Barracks, PA, Army War college, May 1983. 31 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 39080-4 N149u

Oluvic, N. Michael. Conceptual Design of a Cybernetic Information System for Command and Control. Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 1997. 1 vol.
Doc. call no.: M-U 42525 O522c

Open Source Intelligence: Reader 2.0. Fairfax, VA, Open Source Solutions, Inc, 1999. 1 vol.
Doc. call no.: M-U 44326-2

Pick, Michael W. What the Joint Force Commander Needs to Know About CI and HUMINT Operations. Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2002. 1 vol.
Also available online at:
http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA405644
Doc. call no.: M-U 41662 P594w

Smilas, Joseph. Intelligence in NATO: A New Paradigm. Carlisle Barracks, PA, U.S. Army War College, 2000. 21 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 39080-537 S9551i

United States. Assistant Secretary of Defense for Command, Control Communications and Intelligence. Integrated C4* Architectures Division. United States Atlantic Command. Command C4ISR Architecture. Washington, United States Atlantic Command, 1998. 1 vol.
Doc. call no.: M-U 44141-4d

United States. Assistant Secretary of Defense for Command, Control Communications and Intelligence. Integrated C4I Architectures Division. United States Central Command. USCENTCOM Targeting Architecture: Validation of the C4ISR Operational Architecture Framework for a Command Architecture. MacDill AFB, FL, United States Central Command, 1997. 2 vols.
Doc. call no.: M-U 44141-1c

United States. Assistant Secretary of Defense for Command, Control Communications and Intelligence. Integrated C4I Architectures Division. United States European Command. Information Superiority in all Operations. Washington, United States European Command, 1997. 1 vol.
Doc. call no.: M-U 44141-5c

United States. Assistant Secretary of Defense for Command, Control Communications and Intelligence. Intelligence and Communications Architectures Office. United States Pacific Command. Command C4ISR Architecture (CCA). Washington, United States Pacific Command, 1997. 1 vol.
Doc. call no.: M-U 44141-6c

Urquhart, Martin I. The Effectiveness of Human Intelligence in Operation Uphold Democracy. Fort Leavenworth, KS, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, 1996. 121 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 42022 U79e

Van Joolen, Vincent J. Artificial Intelligence and Robotics on the Battlefields of 2020?. Carlisle Barracks, PA, U.S. Army War College, 2000. 19 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 39080-537 V258a

Wishart, Eric. Intelligence Networks and the Tri Border Area of South America: The Dilemma of Efficiency Versus Oversight. Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2002. 95 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA411244
Doc. call no.: M-U 42525 W8141i

Periodicals

Annati, Massimo. UUVs and AUVs Come of Age. Military Technology 29:72-80 June 2005.
The article informs that the recent technological developments are opening the way towards the development of Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs) capable to fulfil a number of roles in different areas of naval warfare. In parallel, there is a growing requirement for operating Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs), that is, steadily reducing the need of man-in-the-loop decisions during the mission. The very first role where UUVs are being considered is intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance. In these missions, a UUV could collect intelligence both above the surface and underwater.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17713270

Barnett, Gary G. HUMINT (Human Intelligence) Collection During Peace Operations. Military Intelligence 27:18-19+ January-September 2001.

Barnett, Gary G. MI Tactical HUMINT (Human Intelligence) Team Operations in Kosovo. Military Intelligence 27:20-22 January-September 2001.

Braden, Nate A. Marine Corps Signals Intelligence. Marine Corps Gazette 84:62-65 April 2000.

Burgess, Richard R. UAV Tests Its Sea Legs. Sea Power 48:12-14 May 2005.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=16854344

Burkhard, Alfred. Army Intelligence Master Plan. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 30:64-65 January-March 2004.
Reports on the approval of the Distributed Common Ground System-Army (DCGS-A) by the U.S. Army Requirements Oversight Council. Purpose of the DCGS-A; Role of integrated process teams involved in the implementation of the DCGS-A.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=12846531

Butler, Amy and Fulghum, David A. New Frontiers. Aviation Week & Space Technology 162:22-24 March 7, 2005.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=16411100

Chopin, Theodore G. ASAS (All-Source Analysis System): New Ways to Leverage Human Analytical Power. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 22:10-12 July-September 1996.
Focuses on the All-Source Analysis System (ASAS) program of the US Military Intelligence Corps. Importance of the ASAS remote Workstation; ASAS All-Source functionality; Application of lessons learned; Software support.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=9608072408

Clarke, Stephen C. USAIC (U.S. Army Intelligence Center) Fields Two New Intelligence Manuals. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 30:52-54 April-June 2004.
Presents information on the field manuals (FM) for military intelligence being developed by the U.S. Army Intelligence Center and Fort Huachuca in Arizona. Reason behind the development of the manuals; Features of FM 2-22.3 Human Intelligence Collector Operations manual; Information on ST 2-91.6 Small Unit Support to Intelligence manual.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=14165449

Connors, Lisa A. Excess Reporting - Handoff Issues for Both HUMINT (Human Intelligence) Collectors and CI (Counterintelligence) Agents. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 30:33-34 April-June 2004.
Explores the problem of excess reporting by U.S. counterintelligence (CI) agents and human intelligence (HUMINT) at rotational operations. Factors that contribute to excess reporting; Solutions to the problem.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=14165420

Cook, Nick. Briefing: ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance) -- Manned or Unmanned? Jane's Defence Weekly 40:22-25 November 19, 2003.

Cox, Matthew. Bringing Cold War Units into the Information Age. Army Times 63:16 January 20, 2003.

CSA's (Army Chief of Staff) Focus Area 16: Actionable Intelligence. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 30:68-71 July-September 2004.

Danskine, William B. Aggressive ISR in the War on Terrorism: Breaking the Cold War Paradigm. Air & Space Power Journal 19:73-83 Summer 2005.

Eaton, Richard S. Introduction to CHATS and CHASIS (the Army's Counterintelligence-Human Intelligence Automated Tool Set and All-Source Integration System). Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 24:24-27 October-December 1998.
Features the United States Army's counterintelligence/human intelligence (CI/HUMINT) Automated Tool Set (CHATS) and All-Source Integration System (CHASIS). Background of the software; Benefits to soldiers; Future improvements.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=1758804

Erwin, Sandra I. Army Trying to Get Better Grasp on War Zone Intelligence. National Defense 89:18 October 2004.

Erwin, Sandra I. Battlefield Information Glut not Always Useful to Soldiers. National Defense 89:27 September 2004.

Fabey, Michael. Fighter Jets to be 'Information Sponges.' Air Force Times 65:16 July 4, 2005.
Reports on the incorporation of Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance sensors to F/A-22 Raptor and F-35 Joint Strike Fighter jets by the U.S. Air Force in 2005. Views of Loren Thompson, vice president of the think tank Lexington Institute in Arlington, Virginia, on F/A-22; Similarities of the sensor suite with other advanced electronic intelligence; Decision of the Air Force to keep the capabilities of the F/A-22 secret.

Fallon, Christine V. CGS (Common Ground Station) and Apache-Longbow Linkage --A 2d Infantry Division Initiative. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 29:51-52 July-September 2003.
Provides information on Common Ground Station (CGS), a receiver-processor of Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System data of the U.S. Armed Forces. Details of the CGS and Apache-Longbow Linkage initiative; Importance of the initiative to the military intelligence community; Background of the initiative.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=10444998

Fink, James V. Battlespace Visualization and the All-Source Analysis System (ASAS). Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 28:5-8 October-December 2002.
Focuses on the role of the All-Source Analysis System Remote Workstation in the battlespace visualization process used in the U.S. military. Integration of weather and terrain analysis; Automation of military intelligence; Features of the Intelligence battlefield operating system.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=7917232

Friedman, Norman. Electronic Surveillance Becomes More Agile. U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings 128:4+ June 2002.

Friedman, Norman. Netting Radio and Sensors. U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings 128:6 June 2002.

Fritz, Gregory J. and Montie, Michael E. All-Source Analysis System. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 24:17-20 October-December 1998.
Details the United States Army's flagship tactical intelligence fusion and dissemination system called the All-Source Analysis System (ASAS). Function of ASAS; Basic features of ASAS-Block II; Technical characteristics; Future plans.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=1758802

Fulghum, David A. Shooting Images. Aviation Week & Space Technology 162:53-54 May 23, 2005.
The article reports that the U.S. Air Force F-15Es in the Gulf region are flying on a mission they were never designed for, and it has drawn louder praise from the ground forces than their bomb dropping. The job is called non-traditional ISR (intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance). That means the strike aircraft's package of sensors, designed to precisely place a weapon, is now being used to track insurgent gunmen and messengers or those who plant bombs and plan ambushes. The ultimate goal is not to attack them, but to follow them to safe houses, weapons stores and to others in their network.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17194307

Gellman, Brian. Lessons Learned from OIF: An SF (Special Forces) Battalion S2's Perspective. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 30:35-42 April-June 2004.
Focuses on observations on the tactical, operational and strategic levels of intelligence from Operation IRAQI FREEDOM (OIF) of the U.S. Army. Overview of networking by intelligence officers in OIF; Tips for intelligence officers on establishing credibility and rapport with their commanders; Stages of the cycle of information operation; Discussion of information dissemination; Standards for reporting intelligence assessments.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=14165431

Goodman, Glenn W. Low-Density/High-Demand: USAF's Limited Numbers of ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance) Aircraft Remain Overstretched. Armed Forces Journal International 139:20-21 October 2001.

Goodman, Glenn W. Single Voice for War Fighters: U.S. Strategic Command Implements Joint ISR Mission. C4ISR 4:20-22 March 2005.

Goodman, Glenn W. Vanguards of Change: Two Planned ISR Aircraft Tailor-Made for U.S. Navy's Modus Operandi. C4ISR 4:34-35+ April 2005.

Goodman, Lee. Doctrine Corner: FM (Field Manual) 2-0, Intelligence: Changes to Expand Our Capstone Doctrine. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 30:66-68 January-March 2004.
Provides information on the revised DRAG Draft of FM 2-0 which was developed to describe intelligence support to the commander within the new contemporary operational environment. Development of FM 2-0; List of critical variables of the contemporary operational environment in context with the operational environment; Functions of the intelligence operations that constitute the intelligence process.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=12846537

Hart, Jon-Paul. Killer Spooks. Marine Corps Gazette 89:16-18 April 2005.
Advocates increasing the human intelligence (HumInt) collection capability by assigning collectors to tactical-level units of the Armed Forces. Imperative for making HumInt collectors an organic element of reconnaissance organizations throughout the military; Tenets of guerrilla warfare as laid down by Mao Tse Tung and Che Guevara.

Hebert, Adam J. Warfare Centers May Merge. Air Force Magazine 88:16-17 April 2005.

Herskovitz, Don. Sampling of SIGINT (Signals Intelligence) Systems. Journal of Electronic Defense 21:51-59 July 1998.
Features signals-intelligence (SIGINT) systems that employ a range of approaches to detect and intercept battlefield radar and communications. National Reconnaissance Office's Galactic Radiation and Background Experiment; Boeing Co.'s Trumpet; Carnivore Diagnostic Tool.

Hobbins, William Thomas. Airmen on the Battlefield. Air & Space Power Journal 19:67-79 Spring 2005.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17138474

Hosenball, Mark and Wolffe, Richard. The CIA vs the DIA. Newsweek 143:8 April 19, 2004.
Examines the claims and counterclaims between the United States Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and the Pentagon's Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) regarding faulty military intelligence that was the key to U.S. President George W. Bush's case for going to war with Iraq. Evidence provided by an Iraqi source about mobile biological weapons laboratories and factories; Involvement of the German intelligence service; How Colin Powell used the information provided by the informant.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/direct.asp?an=12796965&db=aph

Jacobi, Kevin L. Battle Command to ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance) Planning. Armor 111:21-25 September-October 2002.

Jones, Jerry W. ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance) Support to Force Protection. Military Intelligence 29:5-12 April-June 2003.

Kasales, Michael C. The Reconnaissance Squadron and ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance) Operations. Military Review 82:52-58 May-June 2002.

Keeter, Hunter C.  Urban Operations Challenge Shows Limits of U.S., Allied ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance andReconnaissance) Capability. Sea Power 47:14-15 May 2004.

Kenyon, Henry S. Unconventional Information Operations Shorten Wars. Signal 57:33-36 August 2003.

Kucera, Joshua. US Army Bolsters Intelligence Fusion. Jane's Defence Weekly 42:7 April 6, 2005.

Lewis, Dennis. Supporting Close Combat: Intelligence Synchronization. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 29:15-18 January-March 2003.
Focuses on the intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) synchronization in relation to the military decision-making process at the maneuver battalion, task force and squadron level in the U.S. Purpose of ISR synchronization; Factors that contribute to the success of ISR planning; Information required for ISR assets to begin infiltration; Analytical materials needed in the military.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=9063763

Marburger, Joan C. Defense Department Partners with Industry for Signals Intelligence. Signal 54:79-80 December 1999.

Marx, Paul H. Proficient Navy and Marine Corps Intelligence Analysts are Expeditionary Warfare Necessities. U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings 130:44-45 February 2004.

Messer, William. Getting Space-Based ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance) Data to Warfighters. Military Review 81:42-45 November-December 2001.

Meyer, David A. On a Wing and a Prayer: Reversing the Trend in BCT (Brigade Combat Team) ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance) and Shaping Operations. Armor 112:21-25 July-August 2003.

Moore, William K. MASINT (Measurement and Signatures Intelligence): New Eyes in the Battlespace. Military Intelligence 29:31-34+ January-March 2003.
Presents information on the measurement and signatures intelligence (MASINT) concept of operation (CONOP) used in the U.S. Army. Features of the MASINT CONOP; Importance of MASINT in identifying battlespace entities; Nature of tactical MASINTS; Benefits of MASINT to the field commander.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=9063767

Morgan, Matthew J. Civilians on the CTC (Combat Training Center) Battlefield--Threat, Opportunity, or Distraction? Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 29:49-51 January-March 2003.
Focuses on the civilian role-players at the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC) in Fort Polk, Louisiana. Background of civilians opposing force at JRTC; Importance of civilians in providing an opportunity in counterintelligence endeavor; Challenges in exploiting civilians on the battlefield.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=9063772

Norris, Larry. Transforming Counterintelligence and Human Intelligence. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 29:47-55 October-December 2003.
Focuses on the creation of the Counterintelligence (CI) and Human Intelligence (HUMINT) Integrated Concept Team (ICT) that will identify the requirements needed to transform CI and HUMINT forces. Focus of U.S. Army CI and HUMINT after the collapse of the Soviet Union; Purpose of the Army's Objective Force; Requirements identified by ICT for CI and HUMINT.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=11815868

Ott, David G. Winning Through Logistical Support: An Unconventional Approach. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 30:34 January-March 2004.
Challenges the tactics, techniques, procedures and conventional wisdom on the doctrinal use of Headquarters and Headquarters Operations Company and its logistical support to intelligence operations. Importance of logistical support to the success of the military intelligence operations; Tenets of effective logistical support to intelligence operations; Applications of the tenets for effective logistical support to military operations.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=12846457

Pick, Michael W. CI (Counterintelligence) and HUMINT (Human Intelligence) in Multinational Operations: The Lessons of Vigilant Blade 97. Military Intelligence 25:16-20 January-March 1999.

Quedensley, Thomas J. The Commercial Satellite Multispectral Imagery (MSI) Threat. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 28:24-28 January-March 2002.
Discusses the increasing potential imagery intelligence threat (IMINT) in the United States brought about by the commercialization of satellite multispectral imagery (MSI). Characteristics and capabilities of commercial imaging satellites; Potential involvement of the governments with the MSI industry; Assessment of IMINT risks and efforts of U.S. and other countries in the regulation of MSI.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=5921745

Richelson, Jeffrey T. A "Rifle" in Space. Air Force Magazine 86:72-75 June 2003.
Focuses on the spy satellite KH-7 of the U.S. Air Force. Capability to provide clear images; Flexibility of the camera system; Functionality of KH-7.

Risen, James. How Pair's Finding on Terror Led to Clash on Shaping Intelligence. New York Times, pA1, Op, April 28, 2004.
Examines how a two-man U.S. Pentagon intelligence unit created after September 11, 2001, reported an increasingly unified Islamic terrorist threat and links between Iraq and Al Qaeda. Efforts of Michael Maloof and Douglas J. Feith Defense Intelligence Agency to track links between terrorists and host countries; Warning that ethnic, religious and political divides between terrorist groups were breaking down; Controversy over their findings; Investigation by the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence whether the unit exaggerated the threat posed by Iraq to justify the war; Contention of other intelligence agencies that they found little evidence to support the group's findings; Resistance from the Central Intelligence Agency and the Defense Intelligence Agency to the unit; The team's briefing for Paul D. Wolfowitz, deputy secretary of defense; Questions over the terrorism link.

Robeson, Paul. Bush vs. Powell and Rice.  New York Amsterdam News 95:13 April 15, 2004.
President Bush launched what he called a preemptive war. The "War on Terror" is a figure of speech, such as "war against fear" or "war on poverty" or "war against drugs." The key military component of such a program is a strong" Special Operations" capability that relies on Military Intelligence, rather than primarily on the CIA or the FBI.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/direct.asp?an=12857739&db=aph

Rockwell, David L. SIGINT: The New Electronic Warfare. Aerospace America 42:22-25 June 2004.
Looks at the potential of SIGINT or signals intelligence as a new electronic warfare. Components of SIGINT; Importance of each SIGINT component in military operations; Search for new funding that is programmed to develop SIGINT Systems.

Safire, William. Spookspeak. New York Times Magazine 154:16 February 13, 2005.
Comments on the distinction between the words "clandestine" and "covert," and their usage in current events. Creation of a new team of spies by the U.S. Department of Defense, first called "Humint Augmentation Teams" and now called "Strategic Support Team"; Concern created in Congress about the name switch, which was seen as clandestine; Definitions of clandestine and covert.

Shaffer, Michael D. The JIVA Knowledge Discovery Toolkit. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 28:26-28 October-December 2002.
Discusses the initiative of the U.S. Joint Intelligence Virtual Architecture office regarding information technologies for the all-source intelligence analysis. Creation of a global enterprise level hardware infrastructure; Intelligence information technology; Problems with military intelligence.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=7917408

Sherman, Jason. Pentagon Wants MAJIIC (Multi-Sensor Aerospace-Ground Joint ISR Interoperability Coalition) to Make Intel Jams Flow. Defense News 19:28 August 23, 2004.

Sherman, Kenneth B. Army ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance): Riflemen Get the Picture. Journal of Electronic Defense 24:39-43 February 2001.

Smith, Daniel W. Force XXI: An Army IMINT (Imagery Intelligence) Concept. Military Intelligence 22:28-31+ April-June 1996.
Discusses how imagery intelligence (IMINT) can better support the Force XXI project of the United States Army. Definition of IMINT; Basic requirement; Assumptions; IMINT concepts that support Force XXI; Digital area studies (DAS); Military activities assisted by the Mission Planning and Rehearsal Systems (MPRS); Training of people that will be involved in IMINT.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=9605235385

Smith, Hazel. Improving Intelligence on North Korea. Jane's Intelligence Review 16:48-51 April 2004.

Stallings, Ron and Foley, Michael. CI(Counterintelligence) and HUMINT (Human Intelligence) Operations in Support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 29:43-46 October-December 2003.
Discusses the value of counterintelligence (CI) and human intelligence (HUMINT) operations during Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan in 2003. Assessment of tactical CI and interrogation operations; List of CI and HUMINT lessons learned.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=11815853

Taylor, Michael C. Benchmark for Intelligence Transformation. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 29:9-14 January-March 2003.
Presents information on the Intelligence Battlefield Operating System (BOS) within the U.S. Army. Definition of the Intelligence BOS; Principles that guide the Intelligence BOS; Missions of the Intelligence BOS; Standards in measuring the effectiveness of the intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance effort of the Army.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=9063762

Tiron, Roxana. Army Criticized for Not Learning from Past Wars. National Defense 89:16-17 September 2004.

Tiron, Roxana. Poor Intelligence Hampers Precision Weapon Performance. National Defense 88:34-35 March 2004.

Tirpak, John A. Expanding the UAV Horizon. Air Force Magazine 88:11 April 2005.

Tirpak, John A. The UAV Skirmishes. Air Force Magazine 88:11-12 June 2005.
Reports on the U.S. Air Force's (USAF) petition to be the Defense Department's executive agent for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). USAF initiative to be a leader in providing intelligence-surveillance-reconnaissance assets; USAF deputy chief of staff for air and space operations, Ronald E. Keys' testimony before the tactical air and land forces panel of the House Armed Services Committee; Pentagon's appointment of the USAF in charge of the Joint Unmanned Combat Air System program.

Transforming Military Intelligence. Signal 57:41-43 July 2003.

Wheeler, Warren C. Naval Intel Must (Re) Acquire Core Skills: Naval Intelligence Essay Contest Winner. U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings 130:42-47 February 2004.

Where is Defense HUMINT (Human Intelligence) in America's New War? Defense Intelligence Journal 11:81-89 Winter 2002.

Wilson, Wade C. An Open-Source Overview of the Technical Intelligence Collection Threat in Asia. Military Intelligence 30:21-24 April-June 2004.

Videos

The Cold War the Strangelove Factor. Alexandria, VA, Time-Life Video, 1999. 1 videocassete (50 min).
AUL Video 909.825 C6882

The Gulf War Secrets in the Sand. Alexandria, VA, Time-Life Video, 1999. 1 videocassette (50 min).
AUL Video 956.70442 G9719


Asia Intelligence


Books

Ball, Desmond. China's Signals Intelligence (SIGINT): Satellite Programs. Canberra, Australia, Strategic and Defense Studies Centre, 2003. 28 p.
Book call no.: 355.3432 B187c

Ball, Desmond. Japanese Airborne SIGINT Capabilities. Canberra, Australia, Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Australian National University, 2000. 46 p.
Book call no.: 355.3432 B187j

Eftimiades, Nicholas. Chinese Intelligence Operations. Annapolis, MD, Naval Institute Press, 1994. 169 p.
Book call no.: 327.1251 E27c

Intelligence and National Security., Aldrich, Richard J. Portland, OR, Frank Cass, 2000. 298 p.
Book call no.: 327.127305 C587

International Intelligence Forum 2003: Intelligence Cooperation in the Asia-Pacific Region: Establishing a Framework for Multilateralism. Washington, Joint Military Intelligence College, 2004. 146 p.
International Intelligence Fellows Program, March 2003.
Book call no.: 355.3432 I612

Documents

Dewan, Jay P. How will the Indian Military's Upgrade and Modernization of its ISR, Precision Strike, and Missile Defense Affect the Stability in South Asia?. Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2005. 77 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA432223
Doc. call no.: M-P 42525 D515h

Periodicals

Minnick, Wendell. Briefing: US-Taiwanese Signals Intelligence. Jane's Defence Weekly 39:18-19+ January 22, 2003.

Wilson, Wade C. An Open-Source Overview of the Technical Intelligence Collection Threat in Asia. Military Intelligence 30:21-24 April-June 2004.


European Union Intelligence


Books

Valimaki, Pasi. Intelligence in Peace Support Operations. Helsinki, National Defence College, 2000. 210 p.
Book call no.: 355.357 V172i

Periodicals

Aldrich, Richard J. Transatlantic Intelligence and Security. International Affairs 80:731-753 July 2004.

Lok, Joris Janssen. Global Hawk Demonstration Success Takes ISR Procurement One Step Closer. Jane's International Defense Review 37:58-63 January 2004.
Reports on the demonstration of a U.S. Air Force Northrop Grumman RQ-4A Global Hawk high-altitude, long-endurance (HALE) unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) in Germany. Plan of the German air force to acquire a wide intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) system; Overview of the ISR program of Germany; Procurement program for a German HALE UAV.

Macrakis, Kristie. Does Effective Espionage Lead to Success in Science and Technology? Lessons from the East German Ministry for State Security. Intelligence & National Security 19:52-77 Spring 2004.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&an=13456923

Segell, Glen M. Intelligence Agency Relations Between the European Union and the US. International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence 17:81-96 Spring 2004.


Great Britain Intelligence


Books

Davies, Philip H. J. The British Secret Services. New Brunswick, NJ, Transaction Publishers, 1996. 147 p.
Book call no.: 327.1241 D257b

Florence, Gregory J. Courting a Reluctant Ally: An Evaluation of U.S./UK Naval Intelligence Cooperation, 1935-1941. Washington, Center for Strtegic Intelligence Research, Joint Military Intelligence College, 2004. 120 p.
With a foreword by Rear Admiral Thomas A. Brooks, USN (Ret.) former Director of Naval Intelligence.
Book call no.: 355.3432 F632c

Hamrick, S. J. Deceiving the Deceivers: Kim Philby, Donald Maclean and Guy Burgess. New Haven, CT, Yale University Press, 2004. 297 p.
Book call no.: 327.1247041 T985d

M15 and Ireland, 1939-1945: The Official History, edited and introduced by Eunan O'Halpin and foreword by Christopher Andrew. Portland, OR, Irish Academic Press, 2003. 130 p.
Book call no.: 940.548641 M618

Periodicals

Barrie, Douglas. Running Slow. Aviation Week & Space Technology 163:31-32 July 25, 2005.
The article reports that the British Defense Ministry is going ahead with its 800 million pound ($1.4-billion) Watchkeeper unmanned aerial vehicle program. The Watchkeeper requirement is a crucial element of the ministry's intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance architecture, and thus is a fundamental building block in its network-enabled capability. Alongside this project, the ministry harbors ambitions to acquire and deploy at least a handful of long-endurance Predator B unmanned aerial vehicles early in 2006.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17806102

Foot, M. R. D. What use was SOE (Special Operations Executive)? RUSI Journal 148:76-83 February 2003.

J. J. L. Precision-Strike Limitations Lead Air Forces to Network Priorities. Jane's International Defense Review 38:4 July 2005.
Focuses on the message delivered by British Air Marshall Brian Burridge on the emphasis of modern Western air forces on building network-enabled capabilities. Advantages of air power during military operations; Lessons learned from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq; Plans for the British intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance strategy.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&an=17506240

Knight, Mark. UK Air ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance): Maximising Effect. Royal Air Force Air Power Rreview 7:68-87 Summer 2004.

Pengelley, Rupert. UK Expands Army Surveillance and Intelligence Capabilities. Jane's International Defense Review 38:6 February 2005.
Reports on the measures initiated for the expansion of the army surveillance and intelligence capabilities of Great Britain, as of February 2005. Establishment of a new Defence HUMINT Unit as part of the Intelligence Corps; Investment made for fire-support purposes; Improvements made to armored infantry battalions.

Skinner, Tony. UK Programme Will Integrate ISTAR Systems. Jane's Defence Weekly 42:14 May 11, 2005.


Israel Intelligence


Books

Clements, Frank A. The Israeli Secret Services. New Brunswick, NJ, Transaction Publishers, 1996.   80 p.
Book call no.: 016.32712 C626i

Periodicals

Jones, Clive. "One Size Fits All": Israel, Intelligence, and the al-Aqsa Intifada. Studies in Conflict & Terrorism 26:273-288 July-August 2003.
While the world remains familiar with the ever present visual images of the ongoing violence between Israel and the Palestinians, relatively little attention has been paid to the manner in which intelligence has been used by Israel in its attempts to curb what it regards as Palestinian terrorism. This article looks at the way in which tactical or operational intelligence has come to be used by both the Israel Defence Forces and the political leadership to inform strategic choice, a position that favors a military rather than political solution to the ongoing violence.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=sih&an=10314330

Jones, Clive. 'A Reach Greater than the Grasp': Israeli Intelligence and the Conflict in South Lebanon 1990-2000. Intelligence & National Security 16:1-26 Autumn 2001.
Examines the way in which intelligence was used by Israel in its war against Hizb'allah in south Lebanon. Strategy, culture and intelligence of Israel; Intelligence structures of Israel in south Lebanon; Regime targeting and technical intelligence of Israel.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=sih&an=6903276

Opall-Rome, Barbara. Blanket of Knowledge: Israel Leads Mideast States in Creating Seamless ISR From Patchwork Capabilities. C4ISR 4:32-35 January-February 2005.


Mexico Intelligence


Periodicals

Leroy, Christophe. Mexican Intelligence at a Crossroad. SAIS Review 24:107-130 Winter-Spring 2004.


NATO Intelligence


Books

Valimaki, Pasi. Intelligence in Peace Support Operations. Helsinki, National Defence College, 2000. 210 p.
Book call no.: 355.357 V172i


Russia Intelligence


Internet Resources

Kiknadze, V. G. The Dependence of SIGINT Effectiveness on the Intensity of Enemy Radio Traffic (Based on Analysis of the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945). Military Thought 14:212-220 2005.
Presents a historical analysis of the development and combat employment of Soviet Navy signal intelligence in the Great Patriotic War in Russia. Dependence between the intensity of enemy radio communication traffic and the effectiveness of signals intelligence; Cause of signals intelligence; Increase in the number of radio stations and radio communication channels.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=16430227

Books

Ashley, Clarence. CIA Spy Master. Gretna, LA, Pelican Publishing Company, 2004. 350 p.
Book call no.: 327.12730092 A826c

Stephan, Robert W. Stalin's Secret War: Soviet Counterintelligence Against the Nazis, 1941-1945. Lawrence, KS, University Press of Kansas, 2004. 349 p.
Book call no.: 940.548647 S827s

Periodicals

Galeotti, Mark. Putin Reintroduces Centralised Intelligence. Jane's Intelligence Review 15:52-53 May 2003.


Intelligence Gathering Methods


Internet Resources

U.S. Army. All Source Analysis System (ASAS) - Warfighter Guide to Intelligence 2000
Available online at: http://www.fas.org/irp/doddir/army/wg2000/part05.htm

Documents

United States. Assistant Secretary of Defense for Command, Control Communications and Intelligence. Integrated C4I Architectures Division. United States European Command. Information Superiority in all Operations. Washington, United States European Command, 1997. 1 vol.
Doc. call no.: M-U 44141-5c

Periodicals

Chopin, Theodore G. ASAS (All-Source Analysis System): New Ways to Leverage Human Analytical Power. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 22:10-12 July-September 1996.
Focuses on the All-Source Analysis System (ASAS) program of the US Military Intelligence Corps. Importance of the ASAS remote Workstation; ASAS All-Source functionality; Application of lessons learned; Software support.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=9608072408

Eaton, Richard S. Introduction to CHATS and CHASIS (the Army's Counterintelligence-Human Intelligence Automated Tool Set and All-Source Integration System). Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 24:24-27 October-December 1998.
Features the United States Army's counterintelligence/human intelligence (CI/HUMINT) Automated Tool Set (CHATS) and All-Source Integration System (CHASIS). Background of the software; Benefits to soldiers; Future improvements.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=1758804

Fink, James V. Battlespace Visualization and the All-Source Analysis System (ASAS). Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 28:5-8 October-December 2002.
Focuses on the role of the All-Source Analysis System Remote Workstation in the battlespace visualization process used in the U.S. military. Integration of weather and terrain analysis; Automation of military intelligence; Features of the Intelligence battlefield operating system.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=7917232

Fritz, Gregory J. and Montie, Michael E. All-Source Analysis System. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 24:17-20 October-December 1998.
Details the United States Army's flagship tactical intelligence fusion and dissemination system called the All-Source Analysis System (ASAS). Function of ASAS; Basic features of ASAS-Block II; Technical characteristics; Future plans.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=1758802

Gaynor, Michael J. ASAS (All-Source Analysis System) Contributions to Operation Iraqi Freedom. Military Intelligence 29:29-30+ October-December 2003.

Nunn, Matthew J. ASAS (All-Source Analysis System) Master Analysts' Support to IO (Information Operations) -- Information Engineering (Part 1 in a 3 part series). Military Intelligence 29:64 July-September 2004.

O'Brien, Kevin and Nusbaum, Joseph. Intelligence Collection for Asymmetric Threats, part 2. Jane's Intelligence Review 12:50-55 November 2000.

Shaffer, Michael D. The JIVA Knowledge Discovery Toolkit. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 28:26-28 October-December 2002.
Discusses the initiative of the U.S. Joint Intelligence Virtual Architecture office regarding information technologies for the all-source intelligence analysis. Creation of a global enterprise level hardware infrastructure; Intelligence information technology; Problems with military intelligence.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=7917408


Artificial Intelligence


Documents

Fountoukidis, Dimitrios P. Adaptive Management of Emerging Battlefield Network. Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2004. 96 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA422313
Doc. call no.: M-U 42525 F771a

Goan, Terrance. A Uniform Interface for Active and Intelligent Information Access and Discovery. Rome, NY, Air Force Research Laboratory, Information Directorate, 1998. 21 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 44289-13 1998 no.89

Jackson, Pamela D. Artificial Intelligence's Role in Advancing the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA). Carlisle Barracks, PA, U.S. Army War College, 2002. 34 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA401055
Doc. call no.: M-U 39080-537 J132a

MacDonald, John Scott. Agent Based Computing and Effective Self-Synchronization in Netted Warfare. Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2003. 1 vol.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA415987
Doc. call no.: M-U 41662 M1351a

Meyer, Robert A. and Conry, Susan E. Distributed Artificial Intelligence for Communications Network Management. Griffiss AFB, NY, Rome Air Development Center, December 1990. 156 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 31319-2 no. 90-404

Oluvic, N. Michael. Conceptual Design of a Cybernetic Information System for Command and Control. Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 1997. 1 vol.
Doc. call no.: M-U 42525 O522c

Van Joolen, Vincent J. Artificial Intelligence and Robotics on the Battlefields of 2020?. Carlisle Barracks, PA, U.S. Army War College, 2000. 19 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 39080-537 V258a


Counterintelligence (CI)


Books

A Counterintelligence Reader Editor, edited by Frank J. Rafalko. Washington, National Counterintelligence Center, 2004. 1 CD-ROM.
Also available online at: http://purl.access.gpo.gov/GPO/LPS54742
Book call no.: 327.1273 C855

Cunningham, David. There's Something Happening Here: The New Left, the Klan, and FBI Counterintelligence. Berkeley, CA, University of California Press, 2004. 366 p.
Book call no.: 363.25931 C973t

Encyclopedia of Intelligence and Counterintelligence, edited by Rodney P. Carlisle. Armonk, NY, M. E. Sharpe, Inc, 2004. 2 vols.
Book call no.: R 327.1203 E561

M15 and Ireland, 1939-1945: The Official History, edited and introduced by Eunan O'Halpin and foreword by Christopher Andrew. Portland, OR, Irish Academic Press, 2003. 130 p.
Book call no.: 940.548641 M618

Stephan, Robert W. Stalin's Secret War: Soviet Counterintelligence Against the Nazis, 1941-1945. Lawrence, KS, University Press of Kansas, 2004. 349 p.
Book call no.: 940.548647 S827s

Documents

Michael, James B. Phase II Report on Intelligent Software Decoys: Intelligent Software Decoy Tools for Cyber Counterintelligence and Security Countermeasures. Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2004. 16 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA422700
Doc. call no.: M-P 42525-196

Mission Need Statement (MNS) for a Counterintelligence and Human Resource Equipment Program (CIHEP). Quantico, VA, United States Marine Corps, March 24, 1994. 1 vol.
Doc. call no.: M-U 42139-57 no. CCC 11.24

Pick, Michael W. What the Joint Force Commander Needs to Know About CI and HUMINT Operations. Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2002. 1 vol.
Also available online at:
http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA405644
Doc. call no.: M-U 41662 P594w

United States. Assistant Secretary of Defense for Command, Control Communications and Intelligence. Integrated C4I Architectures Division. Counterintelligence (CI) Support to Joint Operations. Washington, United States Pacific Command, 1997. 1 vol.
Doc. call no.: M-U 44141-5c

Periodicals

Duncklee, Elizabeth M. and McKnight, Jeremy J. CI (Counterintelligence) Technical Capabilities for Homeland Security. Military Intelligence 28:21 July-September 2002.

Eaton, Richard S. Introduction to CHATS and CHASIS (the Army's Counterintelligence-Human Intelligence Automated Tool Set and All-Source Integration System). Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 24:24-27 October-December 1998.
Features the United States Army's counterintelligence/human intelligence (CI/HUMINT) Automated Tool Set (CHATS) and All-Source Integration System (CHASIS). Background of the software; Benefits to soldiers; Future improvements.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=1758804

Foxen, Patrick J. Defining CI (Counterintelligence) and HUMINT (Human Intelligence) Requirements. Military Intelligence 25:47-49 January-March 1999.

Jones, Jerry W. CI (Counterintelligence) and HUMINT (Human Intelligence) or HUMINT and CI or CI-HUMINT or TAC (Tactical) HUMINT (Confusing, Isn't It?). Military Intelligence 28:28-33 April-June 2002.

Norris, Larry. Transforming Counterintelligence and Human Intelligence. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 29:47-55 October-December 2003.
Focuses on the creation of the Counterintelligence (CI) and Human Intelligence (HUMINT) Integrated Concept Team (ICT) that will identify the requirements needed to transform CI and HUMINT forces. Focus of U.S. Army CI and HUMINT after the collapse of the Soviet Union; Purpose of the Army's Objective Force; Requirements identified by ICT for CI and HUMINT.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=11815868

Pick, Michael W. CI (Counterintelligence) and HUMINT (Human Intelligence) in Multinational Operations: The Lessons of Vigilant Blade 97. Military Intelligence 25:16-20 January-March 1999.


Human Intelligence (HUMINT)


Internet Resources

Agency Group 09. Intelligence Community Facing Challenges with Human Intel. FDCH Regulatory Intelligence Database May 18, 2005.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&an=32W3440302020

Marlo, Francis H. WMD Terrorism and US Intelligence Collection. Terrorism & Political Violence  Autumn 1999.
Available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=sih&an=6410680
Analyzes the importance of intelligence collection to prevent and deter weapon of mass destruction (WMD) terrorism in the U.S. Outline of emerging WMD terrorism threats; Contributions of technical, human and open source intelligence in WMD terrorism assessment; Assessment of different intelligence types in various WMD processes.

Scully, Megan. 'Social Intel' New Tool for U.S. Military Defense News April 26, 2004.
Available online at: http://www.oft.osd.mil/library/library_files/article_362_Defense%20News.doc

Books

Jakub, Jay. Spies and Saboteurs: Anglo-American Collaboration and Rivalry in Human Intelligence Collection and Special Operations, 1940-45. New York, St. Martin's Press, 1999. 280 p.
Book call no.: 940.5486 J25a

Moravec, Hana P. Mind Children: The Future of Robot and Human Intelligence. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press, 1988. 214 p.
Book call no.: 006.3 M831m

Out of the Ordinary: Finding Hidden Threats by Analyzing Unusual Behavior. Santa Monica, CA, Rand, 2004. 155 p.
Book call no.: 363.32 O94

Steele, Robert D. The New Craft of Intelligence, Personal, Public, & Political: Citizen's Action Handbook for Fighting Terrorism, Genocide, Disease, Toxic Bombs, & Corruption. Oakton, VA, OSS International Press, 2002. 438 p.
Book call no.: 363.320973 S814n

Sternberg, Robert J. and Wagner, Richard K. Mind in Context: Interactionist Perspectives on Human Intelligence. New York, Cambridge University Press, 1994. 245 p.
Book call no.: 153 M664

Documents

Becker, David W. Coming in From the Cold ... War: Defense HUMINT Services Support to Military Operations Other Than War.. Fort Leavenworth, KS, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, 2000. 73 p.
"This study examines the Defense HUMINT Service (DHS) and the role it plays in supporting Joint Task Forces (JTF) and theater commander in chiefs (CINCs) in military operations other than war (MOOTW)."
Also available online at: http://stinet.dtic.mil/str/tr4_fields.html
Doc. call no.: M-U 42022 B395c

Clark, Samuel L. Overt HUMINT Debriefing Activities -- A Dichotomy Between Need and Emphasis. Washington, Defense Intelligence School, June 1977. 64 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 42808-12 C585i

Cochran, Lewis C. Human Intelligence: Long-Range Surveillance for Force XXI, A Monograph. Fort Leavenworth, KS, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. School of Advanced Military Studies, January 18, 1996. 52 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 42022-2 C663h

Dilon, Peter J. A Theory for Human Intelligence Operations. Carlisle Barracks, PA, U.S. Army War College, 1999. 45 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 39080-537 D579t

Dymond, John C. Air Force HUMINT: Phoenix or Albatross?. Maxwell AFB, AL, Air War College, 1998. 72 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 43117 D997a

Jackson, Matthew J. Swimming with the Natives: Cultural Immersion and Its Applications for Naval Special Warfare. Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2004. 101 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA427334
Doc. call no.: M-P 42525 J131s

Kneafsey, David B. The Combatant Commander and Effective Operational HUMINT: Lessons From the Double Cross System of World War II and the CJ2X of Operation Joint Guard. Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2003. 1 vol.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA420278
Doc. call no.: M-P 41662 K681c

Mission Need Statement (MNS) for a Counterintelligence and Human Resource Equipment Program (CIHEP). Quantico, VA, United States Marine Corps, March 24, 1994. 1 vol.
Doc. call no.: M-U 42139-57 no. CCC 11.24

Nagle, Homer P. US Army HUMINT Collection -- New Directions. Carlisle Barracks, PA, Army War college, May 1983. 31 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 39080-4 N149u

Pick, Michael W. What the Joint Force Commander Needs to Know About CI and HUMINT Operations. Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2002. 1 vol.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2 ADA405644
Doc. call no.: M-U 41662 P594w

Urquhart, Martin I. The Effectiveness of Human Intelligence in Operation Uphold Democracy. Fort Leavenworth, KS, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, 1996. 121 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 42022 U79e

Wishart, Eric. Intelligence Networks and the Tri Border Area of South America: The Dilemma of Efficiency Versus Oversight. Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2002. 95 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA411244
Doc. call no.: M-U 42525 W8141i

Periodicals

Banks, Tony and Sweetman, Bill. Techint V Humint: The Unseen War. Jane's Defence Weekly 15:221 February 16, 1991.

Barnett, Gary G. HUMINT (Human Intelligence) Collection During Peace Operations. Military Intelligence 27:18-19+ January-September 2001.

Barnett, Gary G. MI Tactical HUMINT (Human Intelligence) Team Operations in Kosovo. Military Intelligence 27:20-22 January-September 2001.

Foxen, Patrick J. Defining CI (Counterintelligence) and HUMINT (Human Intelligence) Requirements. Military Intelligence 25:47-49 January-March 1999.

Hart, Jon-Paul. Killer Spooks. Marine Corps Gazette 89:16-18 April 2005.
Advocates increasing the human intelligence (HumInt) collection capability by assigning collectors to tactical-level units of the Armed Forces. Imperative for making HumInt collectors an organic element of reconnaissance organizations throughout the military; Tenets of guerrilla warfare as laid down by Mao Tse Tung and Che Guevara.

Johnson, Loch K. Spymaster Richard Helms: An Interview with the Former US Director of Central Intelligence. Intelligence & National Security 18:24-44 Autumn 2003.
The former US Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) offered his views on a wide range of intelligence issues. Contrary to conventional wisdom, he argued that members of Congress had maintained rigorous accountability over the secret agencies in the years before the major spy scandal of 1975, when the Central Intelligence Agency was found to have spied on American citizens. He emphasized, too, the vital importance of human (as opposed to technical) intelligence, and expressed cynicism about the effectiveness of large-scale covert actions. For Helms, the DCI's most important job was to bring the facts to the table at high policy meetings.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&an=12353213

Jones, Jerry W. CI (Counterintelligence) and HUMINT (Human Intelligence) or HUMINT and CI or CI-HUMINT or TAC (Tactical) HUMINT (Confusing, Isn't It?). Military Intelligence 28:28-33 April-June 2002.

Norris, Larry. Transforming Counterintelligence and Human Intelligence. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 29:47-55 October-December 2003.
Focuses on the creation of the Counterintelligence (CI) and Human Intelligence (HUMINT) Integrated Concept Team (ICT) that will identify the requirements needed to transform CI and HUMINT forces. Focus of U.S. Army CI and HUMINT after the collapse of the Soviet Union; Purpose of the Army's Objective Force; Requirements identified by ICT for CI and HUMINT.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=11815868

Pengelley, Rupert. UK Expands Army Surveillance and Intelligence Capabilities. Jane's International Defense Review 38:6 February 2005.
Reports on the measures initiated for the expansion of the army surveillance and intelligence capabilities of Great Britain, as of February 2005. Establishment of a new Defence HUMINT Unit as part of the Intelligence Corps; Investment made for fire-support purposes; Improvements made to armored infantry battalions.

Rimington, Stella. 'Humint' Begins at Home. Wall Street Journal - Eastern Edition, p A8, January 3, 2005.
Expresses views on the effectivity of carrying out intelligence work on terrorism closer to targeted places.

Safire, William. Spookspeak. New York Times Magazine 154:16 February 13, 2005.
Comments on the distinction between the words "clandestine" and "covert," and their usage in current events. Creation of a new team of spies by the U.S. Department of Defense, first called "Humint Augmentation Teams" and now called "Strategic Support Team"; Concern created in Congress about the name switch, which was seen as clandestine; Definitions of clandestine and covert.

Scully, Megan. Every Soldier a Sensor. Jane's Intelligence, Surveillance & Reconnaissance Journal 3:29-30 June 2004.

Where is Defense HUMINT (Human Intelligence) in America's New War? Defense Intelligence Journal 11:81-89 Winter 2002.


Imagery Intelligence (IMINT)


Internet Resources

 National Geospatial Intelligence Agency
Available online at: http://www.nga.mil/portal/site/nga01/
"NGA provides timely, relevant, and accurate Geospatial Intelligence in support of national security. We provide Geospatial Intelligence in all its forms, and from whatever source--imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial data and information--to ensure the knowledge foundation for planning, decision, and action."

Documents

Cook, Paul J. Imagery and Measurement and Signatures Intelligence Support to Military Operations on Urbanized Terrain: A Monograph. Fort Leavenworth, KS, School of Advanced Military Studies, Army Command and General Staff College, 2003. 62 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA419915
Doc. call no.: M-P 42022-2 C771i

Marshall, Larry R. Imagery Dissemination: Have We Fixed the Problems of Desert Storm?. Newport, RI, Naval War College, 1998. 25 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 41662 M368i

Periodicals

Quedensley, Thomas J. The Commercial Satellite Multispectral Imagery (MSI) Threat. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 28:24-28 January-March 2002.
Discusses the increasing potential imagery intelligence threat (IMINT) in the United States brought about by the commercialization of satellite multispectral imagery (MSI). Characteristics and capabilities of commercial imaging satellites; Potential involvement of the governments with the MSI industry; Assessment of IMINT risks and efforts of U.S. and other countries in the regulation of MSI.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=5921745

Smith, Daniel W. Force XXI: An Army IMINT (Imagery Intelligence) Concept. Military Intelligence 22:28-31+ April-June 1996.
Discusses how imagery intelligence (IMINT) can better support the Force XXI project of the United States Army. Definition of IMINT; Basic requirement; Assumptions; IMINT concepts that support Force XXI; Digital area studies (DAS); Military activities assisted by the Mission Planning and Rehearsal Systems (MPRS); Training of people that will be involved in IMINT.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=9605235385


Intelligence Analysis


Periodicals

Lefebvre, Stephane. A Look at Intelligence Analysis. International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence 17:231-264 Summer 2004.

McCue, Colleen. Data Mining and Predictive Analytics: Battlespace Awareness for the War on Terrorism. Defense Intelligence Journal 13:47-63 2005.

Rieber, Steven. Intelligence Analysis and Judgmental Callibration. International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence 17:97-112 Spring 2004.


Intelligence-Surveillance-Reconnaissance (ISR)


Internet Resources

Col. Gary Connor Helps Transform C3ISR Technology. Military & Aerospace Electronics 16:21 April 2005.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=16871744

Johnson, R. Colin. Missile-Launched Blimp will Survey 'No-Man's Land'. Electronic Engineering Times July 25, 2005.
Available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17775486
This article reports that Johns Hopkins University has developed a blimp which can provide persistent intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance from "no-man's land." No-man's land isn't just an expression in this context: It's the gap between the 65,000-foot ceiling of commercial aircraft and the 100,000-foot minimal distance required for low-Earth-orbit satellites. Nor is Johns Hopkins the only organization targeting that void: Unmanned military blimps from the U.S. Air Force Space Command and Lockheed Martin are close to deployment. Likewise, Lockheed Martin has done preliminary tests of its prototype for a High Altitude Airship and expects to conduct full tests in 2006.

USAF Intelligence, Surveillance & Reconnaissance Programs and Platforms - ACSC Research Seminar Topic, compiled by Ron Fuller. Maxwell AFB, AL, Air University Library, August 2003.
Available online at: http://www.au.af.mil/au/aul/bibs/isr/isr.htm
ACSC topic description: Discuss the integration of the Rivet Joint, AWACS, and JSTARS aircraft. Compare and contrast Operation Desert Storm, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation Iraqi Freedom ISR successes and failures. How did the Predator and Global Hawk platforms perform during OEF and OIF? How have space assets added to the problem or solution?

Wilson, J. R. UAVs Poised to Take the Next Step into Combat. Military & Aerospace Electronics June 2005.
Available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17396004
Focuses on the use of new generation of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and unmanned combat aerial vehicles (UCAV) by the U.S. Navy and Air Force. Efficacy of unmanned aerial vehicles during the Persian Gulf War of 1991 and 2003; Difficulties in deploying these aircrafts; Significance of UAV and UCAV for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance or lethal missions.

Books

Ghashghai, Elham. Communications Networks to Support Integrated Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Strike Operations. Santa Monica, CA, Rand, 2004. 35 p.
Also available online at: http://www.rand.org/pubs/technical_reports/2004/RAND_TR159.pdf
Book call no.: 355.33041 G411c

Interoperability: A Continuing Challenge in Coalition Air Operations. Santa Monica, CA, Rand, 2000.
Book call no.: 358.400941 I61

Wade, Norman M. The Operations Smartbook: Guide to FM 3-0 Full Spectrum Operations and the Battlefield Operating Systems. Lakeland, FL, Lightning Press, 2002. 1 vol.
Book call no.: 355.4 W121o

Documents

Bradley, Carl M. Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance in Support of Operation Iraqi Freedom: Challenges for Rapid Maneuvers and Joint C4ISR Integration and Interoperability. Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2004. 21 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA422709
Doc. call no.: M-U 41662 B8111i

Buenger, Anthony W. Operation Enduring Freedom: Dawn of a Transformed C4ISR Network Battlespace. Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command andStaff College, 2003. 47 leaves.
"This paper investigates the astonishing rapid advances in the transformation of command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISR) concepts in just a few years. The operations in Afghanistan and Iraq validated the importance of C4ISR in achieving decision superiority, an asymmetrical advantage, over the enemy, and are subsequently laying the groundwork for a fully transformational C4ISR capability. This paper describes the traditional C4ISR process the US military followed for many decades, characterized by disjointed, cyclic decision processes and specialized, stovepiped communications systems that hindered the capability to achieve complete information dominance and decisive battlespace effects."
Doc. call no.: M-U 43122 B9281o

Corsano, Scott Edmund. Joint Fires Network ISR Interoperability Requirements Within a Joint Force Architecture. Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2003. 87 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA417501
Doc. call no.: M-U 42525 C826j

Coyne, Kevin M. The Impact of Network Centric Warfare on ISR Operations. Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2004. 36 p.
"This research paper analyzes the impact of fielding network-centric capabilities like NCCT [Network Centric Collaborative Targeting] aboard airborne ISR aircraft. What impact does NCCT entail for the U-2, RC-135 and E-8? The study will wrestle with the problem of whether current ISR doctrine and ISR organizational culture can effectively adapt to, and incorporate, the TST implications of NCCT. "
Doc. call no.: M-U 43122 C881I

Davis, Stephen L. The Space Maneuver Vehicle: Enhancing Space's Utility to the Warfighter. Quantico, VA, United States Marine Corps Command and Staff College, 2002. 44 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA404007
Doc. call no.: M-U 41886-71 D264s

Dewan, Jay P. How will the Indian Military's Upgrade and Modernization of its ISR, Precision Strike, and Missile Defense Affect the Stability in South Asia?. Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2005. 77 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA432223
Doc. call no.: M-P 42525 D515h

Donovan, Paul B. JFMCC: Theater C2 in Need of Sole. Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2003. unpaged
"Functional operational command and control is an absolute necessity for the successful employment of sustained combat operations. During the past ten years, "revolutionary" changes have occurred in the conduct of war. Airpower seems to have become the weapon of choice. Airpower, directed onto targets by Special Operations Forces (SOF), produced devastating results against the Taliban during Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF). The command and control (C2) network for the war in Afghanistan has functioned well. Although the Joint Force Commander (JFC), the Joint Force Air Component Commander (JFACC), and the combat ground and air assets were geographically separated by thousands of miles, our high-tech command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISk) network overcame the traditional limitations of geographically separated C2. While our C4ISk capabilities are a tremendous asset, they are also a potential Achilles heel.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA415445
Doc. call no.: M-U 41662 D6873j

Fletcher, Barbara. Autonomous Vehicles and the Net-Centric Battlespace. San Diego, CA, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, 2002. 1 vol.
"The horrific terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 on the U.S. homeland highlighted the threat that terrorism poses to U.S. national security. DoD operates globally a large network of Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) assets which could be brought to bear in the effort to combat terrorism. The geographic Commander's-in-Chief(CINCs) set the priorities for the intelligence networks in their Areas of Responsibility (AORs) according to their interpretation of the strategic guidance from the National Command Authority (NCA). A key tenet of the new strategic setting is the grave threat to national security posed by terrorism, potentially using Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, or Enhanced High Explosive (CBRNE) weapons. This fact, coupled with the new strategic mandate that sets defense of the homeland as the highest priority for the U.S. military, dictates that each of the geographic CINCs set combatting terrorist use of CBRNE weapons as the highest priority for their intelligence networks. The success or failure of this operational intelligence effort could have major strategic effects."
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA397125
Doc. call no.: M-U 44451-1

Gardner, Keith and Brown, Michael. The Future Operations Quilt: An ISR Tool for Future Military Operations. Rome, NY, Air Force Research Laboratory, Information Directorate, Rome Research Site, 2003. 55 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 44289-13 2003 no. 242

Hamm, Jeff A. Assessing the Effects of Air Force Combat Operations: Does AF ISR Have the Capability?. Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2004. 30 leaves.
Doc. call no.: M-U 43122 H2243a

Oluvic, Michael N. A Concept of Operations for a Global ISR Campaign. Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2004. 31 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA422743
Doc. call no.: M-U 41662 O525c

Quitno, Yvette S. Airborne Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) Interoperability. Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2003. 35 leaves.
Doc. call no.: M-U 43122 Q8a

Raffetto, Mark. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Contributions to Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Missions for Expeditionary Operations. Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2004. 74 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA427707
Doc. call no.: M-U 42525 R137u

Trefz, John L. From Persistent ISR to Precision Strikes: The Expanding Role of UAVs. Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2003. 24 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA420264
Doc. call no.: M-U 41662 T786f

United States. Assistant Secretary of Defense for Command, Control Communications and Intelligence. Integrated C4I Architectures Division. United States Atlantic Command. Command C4ISR Architecture. Washington, United States Atlantic Command, 1998. 1 vol.
Doc. call no.: M-U 44141-4d

United States. Assistant Secretary of Defense for Command, Control Communications and Intelligence. Integrated C4I Architectures Division. United States Central Command. USCENTCOM Targeting Architecture: Validation of the C4ISR Operational Architecture Framework for a Command Architecture. MacDill AFB, FL, United States Central Command, 1997. 2 vols.
Doc. call no.: M-U 44141-1c

United States. Assistant Secretary of Defense for Command, Control Communications and Intelligence. Intelligence and Communications Architectures Office. United States Pacific Command. Command C4ISR Architecture (CCA). Washington, United States Pacific Command, 1997. 1 vol.
Doc. call no.: M-U 44141-6c

Waite, Mark K. Increasing Time Sensitive Targeting (TST) Efficiency Through Highly Integrated C2ISR. Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2002. 36 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA420652
Doc. call no.: M-U 43122 W145i

Periodicals

Annati, Massimo. UUVs and AUVs Come of Age. Military Technology 29:72-80 June 2005.
The article informs that the recent technological developments are opening the way towards the development of Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs) capable to fulfil a number of roles in different areas of naval warfare. In parallel, there is a growing requirement for operating Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs), that is, steadily reducing the need of man-in-the-loop decisions during the mission. The very first role where UUVs are being considered is intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance. In these missions, a UUV could collect intelligence both above the surface and underwater.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17713270

Barrie, Douglas. Running Slow. Aviation Week & Space Technology 163:31-32 July 25, 2005.
The article reports that the British Defense Ministry is going ahead with its 800 million pound ($1.4-billion) Watchkeeper unmanned aerial vehicle program. The Watchkeeper requirement is a crucial element of the ministry's intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance architecture, and thus is a fundamental building block in its network-enabled capability. Alongside this project, the ministry harbors ambitions to acquire and deploy at least a handful of long-endurance Predator B unmanned aerial vehicles early in 2006.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17806102

Book, Elizabeth G. Prophet Rushed to the Field for Intelligence Collection. National Defense 87:36+ September 2002.

Cook, Nick. Briefing: ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance) -- Manned or Unmanned? Jane's Defence Weekly 40:22-25 November 19, 2003.

Danskine, William B. Aggressive ISR in the War on Terrorism: Breaking the Cold War Paradigm. Air & Space Power Journal 19:73-83 Summer 2005.
This article proposes a strategy to disrupt global terrorist groups by employing airborne intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance missions to deny them sanctuary in weak states. The author argues against placing too much attention upon network-centric warfare and too little upon traditional strategic reconnaissance. Intelligence projection may prove more important than force projection in a global counterterrorism strategy. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17204382

Embraer ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance) Systems: A New Threshold. Asian Defence Journal 12:26-27 December 2004.

Fabey, Michael. Fighter Jets to be 'Information Sponges.' Air Force Times 65:16 July 4, 2005.
Reports on the incorporation of Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance sensors to F/A-22 Raptor and F-35 Joint Strike Fighter jets by the U.S. Air Force in 2005. Views of Loren Thompson, vice president of the think tank Lexington Institute in Arlington, Virginia, on F/A-22; Similarities of the sensor suite with other advanced electronic intelligence; Decision of the Air Force to keep the capabilities of the F/A-22 secret.

Fallon, Christine V. CGS (Common Ground Station) and Apache-Longbow Linkage --A 2d Infantry Division Initiative. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 29:51-52 July-September 2003.
Provides information on Common Ground Station (CGS), a receiver-processor of Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System data of the U.S. Armed Forces. Details of the CGS and Apache-Longbow Linkage initiative; Importance of the initiative to the military intelligence community; Background of the initiative.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=10444998

Friedman, Norman. World Naval Developments: Electronic Surveillance Becomes More Agile. U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings 128:4-6 June 2002.
Presents news items related to worldwide naval developments as of June 2002. Improvement in the agility of electronic surveillance systems in the United States; Netting radio and sensors; Development of next generation surface combatant.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=7016353

Fulghum, David A. Shooting Images. Aviation Week & Space Technology 162:53-54 May 23, 2005.
The article reports that the U.S. Air Force F-15Es in the Gulf region are flying on a mission they were never designed for, and it has drawn louder praise from the ground forces than their bomb dropping. The job is called non-traditional ISR (intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance). That means the strike aircraft's package of sensors, designed to precisely place a weapon, is now being used to track insurgent gunmen and messengers or those who plant bombs and plan ambushes. The ultimate goal is not to attack them, but to follow them to safe houses, weapons stores and to others in their network.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17194307

Gill, Matthew T. Dark Cloud Over Iraq: Shadow TUAV (Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) Extended Split-Based Operations in the Asymmetrical Fight. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 30:24-28 January-March 2004.
Discusses the employment and integration of the U.S. Shadow 200 Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle to achieve a successful operational environment in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Obstacles to overcome in achieving successful operations; Analysis of the operations area and recommended employment of the unmanned aerial vehicle; Missions conducted by the unmanned aerial vehicle.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=12846431

Goodman, Glenn W. Low-Density/High-Demand: USAF's Limited Numbers of ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance) Aircraft Remain Overstretched. Armed Forces Journal International 139:20-21 October 2001.

Goodman, Glenn W. Single Voice for War Fighters: U.S. Strategic Command Implements Joint ISR Mission. C4ISR 4:20-22 March 2005.

Goodman, Glenn W. Vanguards of Change: Two Planned ISR Aircraft Tailor-Made for U.S. Navy's Modus Operandi. C4ISR 4:34-35+ April 2005.

Gormley, Dennis M. The Limits of Intelligence: Iraq's Lessons. Survival 46:7-28 Autumn 2004.
In allocating blame for the intelligence failure over Iraq, critics of the Bush administration focus on former CIA Director George Tenet's bending to White House pressure or the administration's mishandling of intelligence. Supporters of the president downplay White House responsibility and focus instead on the failings of the intelligence community and the possible need for structural reforms. Neither side has it completely wrong — or right. There is substantial evidence that the Bush Administration — like many of its predecessors —oversold the threat to sell its preferred policy choice. But any quest to 'fix' intelligence merely through reorganisation will be futile insofar as it avoids the more prosaic but more critical matter of intelligence effectiveness. This depends far less on structural reform than on the quality of collected intelligence, the nature of the analytic process and, ultimately, the relationship between intelligence and policymaking officials. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=14454007

Hebert, Adam J. Building Battlespace Awareness. Air Force Magazine 87:66-71 September 2004.

Hebert, Adam J. Operation Reachback. Air Force Magazine 87:56-58 April 2004.
Reports on the importance of a developing capability called reachback to providing real-time intelligence to the military troops in the U.S. Ability of combat forces to receive intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance data directly from databases and experts located in the U.S. through the reachback operation; Capacity of deployed forces to receive intelligence that the U.S. Air Force intelligence analysts upload via satellite through laptop computers; Adoption of the reachback operations during the peak hostilities in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Hebert, Adam J. Warfare Centers May Merge. Air Force Magazine 88:16-17 April 2005.

Hewish, Mark and Kass, Lee. Observation from Orbit. Jane's International Defense Review 36:32-40 December 2003.
Focuses on the routine access of defense ministries and intelligence agencies worldwide to high-quality space-based imagery suitable for applications ranging from strategic planning to support of tactical operations as of December 2003. Contribution of space-based sensors to war fighting; Role played by intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance inputs in war fighting operations; Idea behind technical intelligence.

Hobbins, William Thomas. Airmen on the Battlefield. Air & Space Power Journal 19:67-79 Spring 2005.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17138474

Hooton, E. R. It's Not What You Do, It's How You Do It. Armada International 28:17-18+ February-March 2004.

J. J. L. Precision-Strike Limitations Lead Air Forces to Network Priorities. Jane's International Defense Review 38:4 July 2005.
Focuses on the message delivered by British Air Marshall Brian Burridge on the emphasis of modern Western air forces on building network-enabled capabilities. Advantages of air power during military operations; Lessons learned from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq; Plans for the British intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance strategy.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&an=17506240

Jacobi, Kevin L. Battle Command to ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance) Planning. Armor 111:21-25 September-October 2002.

Jones, Jerry W. ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance) Support to Force Protection. Military Intelligence 29:5-12 April-June 2003.

Kasales, Michael C. The Reconnaissance Squadron and ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance) Operations. Military Review 82:52-58 May-June 2002.

Keeter, Hunter C. Urban Operations Challenge Shows Limits of U.S., Allied ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance andReconnaissance) Capability. Sea Power 47:14-15 May 2004.

Knight, Mark. UK Air ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance): Maximising Effect. Royal Air Force Air Power Review 7:68-87 Summer 2004.

Kucera, Joshua. US Army Bolsters Intelligence Fusion. Jane's Defence Weekly 42:7 April 6, 2005.

Kucera, Joshua. US Recognises the Value of Sharing. Jane's Defence Weekly 42:4 February 16, 2005.

Lewis, Dennis. Supporting Close Combat: Intelligence Synchronization. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 29:15-18 January-March 2003.
Focuses on the intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) synchronization in relation to the military decision-making process at the maneuver battalion, task force and squadron level in the U.S. Purpose of ISR synchronization; Factors that contribute to the success of ISR planning; Information required for ISR assets to begin infiltration; Analytical materials needed in the military.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=9063763

Lok, Joris Janssen. Global Hawk Demonstration Success Takes ISR Procurement One Step Closer. Jane's International Defense Review 37:58-63 January 2004.
Reports on the demonstration of a U.S. Air Force Northrop Grumman RQ-4A Global Hawk high-altitude, long-endurance (HALE) unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) in Germany. Plan of the German air force to acquire a wide intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) system; Overview of the ISR program of Germany; Procurement program for a German HALE UAV.

McKenna, Ted. Changing of the Guard: A Variety of ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance) Tools are Useful for Maintaining Peaceful Borders. Journal of Electronic Defense 26:44-46+ July 2003.
Explores the use of intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) technologies to monitor international borders. Use of ISR systems in United Nations' peacekeeping missions; Development of unmanned aerial vehicles; Communications technologies for border patrol.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=10241014

Messer, William. Getting Space-Based ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance) Data to Warfighters. Military Review 81:42-45 November-December 2001.

Meyer, David A. On a Wing and a Prayer: Reversing the Trend in BCT (Brigade Combat Team) ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance) and Shaping Operations. Armor 112:21-25 July-August 2003.

Millington, W. J. The Impact of ISTAR (Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition and Reconnaissance) on Military Deception. Royal Air Force Air Power Review 5:66-93 Spring 2002.

Opall-Rome, Barbara. Blanket of Knowledge: Israel Leads Mideast States in Creating Seamless ISR From Patchwork Capabilities. C4ISR 4:32-35 January-February 2005.

Potts, David. Tactical Combat with the New C4ISTAR (Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance): A British Perspective: First Published in March 2002 as SCSI Occasional Paper no 45 - "The Big Issue: Command and Combat in the Information Age." Military Technology 26:61-62+ 2002.

Richelson, Jeffrey T. A "Rifle" in Space. Air Force Magazine 86:72-75 June 2003.
Focuses on the spy satellite KH-7 of the U.S. Air Force. Capability to provide clear images; Flexibility of the camera system; Functionality of KH-7.

Sanderson, J. R. and Sibayan, Jerome T. Huddle Begins ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance) Synchronization. Infantry 93:10-12 September-October 2004.

Scully, Megan. Every Soldier a Sensor. Jane's Intelligence, Surveillance & Reconnaissance Journal 3:29-30 June 2004.

Sherman, Jason. Front-Line Troops May Get Intel Data Faster. Air Force Times 65:26 August 23, 2004.
Discusses the rollout of Multi-sensor Aerospace-ground Joint ISR Interoperability Coalition (MAJIC) technology project designed to avoid data backlogs by the U.S. Department of Defense in 2004. Operation of MAJIC; Agreement between the MAJIC project and the Air force to begin spinning off capabilities into the service's upgraded Distributed Common Ground System; Countries that expressed an interest in the capability MAJIC is developing.

Sherman, Jason. Pentagon Wants MAJIIC (Multi-Sensor Aerospace-Ground Joint ISR Interoperability Coalition) to Make Intel Jams Flow. Defense News 19:28 August 23, 2004.

Sherman, Kenneth B. Army ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance): Riflemen Get the Picture. Journal of Electronic Defense 24:39-43 February 2001.

Skinner, Tony. UK Programme Will Integrate ISTAR Systems. Jane's Defence Weekly 42:14 May 11, 2005.

Taylor, Michael C. Benchmark for Intelligence Transformation. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 29:9-14 January-March 2003.
Presents information on the Intelligence Battlefield Operating System (BOS) within the U.S. Army. Definition of the Intelligence BOS; Principles that guide the Intelligence BOS; Missions of the Intelligence BOS; Standards in measuring the effectiveness of the intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance effort of the Army.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=9063762

Tirpak, John A. The UAV Skirmishes. Air Force Magazine 88:11-12 June 2005.
Reports on the U.S. Air Force's (USAF) petition to be the Defense Department's executive agent for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). USAF initiative to be a leader in providing intelligence-surveillance-reconnaissance assets; USAF deputy chief of staff for air and space operations, Ronald E. Keys' testimony before the tactical air and land forces panel of the House Armed Services Committee; Pentagon's appointment of the USAF in charge of the Joint Unmanned Combat Air System program.

Tucker-Jones, Anthony. U.S. Airborne Spying. Air Forces Monthly 190:68-73 January 2004.
Article surveys the ways in which the U.S. intelligence community coordinates aerial spying efforts to assist the warfighter.

Weitzel, Karl-Friedrich. New Means for New Challenges (Global Hawk). NATO's Nations and Partners for Peace 48:174-177 2003.

Zulkarnen, Isaak. Embraer's Integrated Solutions --Intelligence, Reconnaissance and Surveillance. Asian Defence Journal 5:48-50 May 2002.


Interrogation


Periodicals

Corera, Gordon. What the Guantanamo Captives Know. Jane's Intelligence Review 14:48-51 July 2002.

Herman, Peter G. Arizona v. Roberson: New Rules of Engagement for Interrogation. Air Force Law Review 30:155-159 1989.

Kleinman, Steven M. The Acme of Skill: Embracing the Potential of Strategic Interrogation. Defense Intelligence Journal 13:65-86 2005.

Levie, Howard S. Enforcing the Third Geneva Convention on the Humanitarian Treatment of Prisoners of War. Journal of Legal Studies 7:37-47 1996-1997.

Owen, Joseph. Ancient Art of Prisoner Quizzing. Military Police 32-35 January 1989.

Stewart, Cheryl. Joint Interrogation Facility Operations. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 17:36-38 October-December 1991.
Focuses on Joint Interrogation Facilities (JIF) during the Gulf War in which interrogations were made in a humane and orderly fashion to get information from prisoners. Information revealed from prisoners of war; Mission of the JIF; Screening process; Interrogation process; Reporting process.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=cookie,ip,url,uid&db=f5h&an=9706253207

Walter, Robert B. ICE-X 1995. Military Intelligence 21:17-19 October-December 1995.
Reports on the annual Interrogation, Counterintelligence, and Enemy Prisoner of War Exercise held at Fort Hood, Texas from May 15 through 25, 1995. Exercise scope; Scenario development; Ramp-up exercises; Role-player training.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=cookie,ip,url,uid&db=f5h&an=9511293504


Network Centric Warfare


Internet Resources

 McKenna, Ted. Mixed Signals. Journal of Electronic Defense 28:49-55 May 2005.
The article reports that digitization and computers help process an increasingly complex radar, communications emissions. Today locating the source of an electronic or communications signal, through such measurements as time difference of arrival and angle of arrival, is getting increasingly accurate, to the point where coordinates of a signals location can be used to more quickly queue other sensors such as imagery and even weapons systems. Signals intelligence, including both communications intelligence and electronic--typically radar--intelligence is, therefore, becoming as integral a part of network-centric warfare as any other type of intelligence.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17173119

Documents

Coyne, Kevin M. The Impact of Network Centric Warfare on ISR Operations. Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2004. 36 p.
"This research paper analyzes the impact of fielding network-centric capabilities like NCCT [Network Centric Collaborative Targeting] aboard airborne ISR aircraft. What impact does NCCT entail for the U-2, RC-135 and E-8? The study will wrestle with the problem of whether current ISR doctrine and ISR organizational culture can effectively adapt to, and incorporate, the TST implications of NCCT. "
Doc. call no.: M-U 43122 C881I

Greenwood, Michael D. E Pluribus Unum: Enhancing Intelligence Support in the Network Centric Environment. Newport, RI, Naval War College, 1999. 18 p.
"To provide the Joint Force Commander the right intelligence in the network centric warfare environment, the intelligence community must overhaul its processes, procedures and organizations."
Doc. call no.: M-U 41662 G816e

Osmun, Richard O. Building the Intelligence Foundation for Network Centric Warfare. Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2001. 31 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 41662 O83b

Periodicals

Hobbins, William Thomas. Airmen on the Battlefield. Air & Space Power Journal 19:67-79 Spring 2005.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17138474


Open Source Intelligence (OSINT)


Internet Resources 

Arnold, Stephen. The Other Intelligent Open Source. Information World Review October 2003.
Available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=11236911
Deals with the emergence of intelligent open source in the information content industry. Reason for the emergence; Distinctions about open source information; Goal of open source intelligence; Model used by most software companies.

Jardines, Eliot A. Using Open-Source Information Effectively. FDCH Congressional Testimony June 21, 2005.
Available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=32Y0101122065

Marlo, Francis H. WMD Terrorism and US Intelligence Collection. Terrorism & Political Violence  Autumn 1999.
Available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=sih&an=6410680
Analyzes the importance of intelligence collection to prevent and deter weapon of mass destruction (WMD) terrorism in the U.S. Outline of emerging WMD terrorism threats; Contributions of technical, human and open source intelligence in WMD terrorism assessment; Assessment of different intelligence types in various WMD processes.

National Geospatial Intelligence Agency
Available online at: http://www.nga.mil/portal/site/nga01/
NGA provides timely, relevant, and accurate Geospatial Intelligence in support of national security. We provide Geospatial Intelligence in all its forms, and from whatever source--imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial data and information--to ensure the knowledge foundation for planning, decision, and action.

United States Intelligence Community
Available online at: http://www.intelligence.gov/
The IC is a federation of executive branch agencies and organizations that work separately and together to conduct intelligence activities necessary for the conduct of foreign relations and the protection of the national security of the United States. "The United States intelligence effort shall provide the President and the National Security Council with the necessary information on which to base decisions concerning the conduct and development of foreign, defense and economic policy, and the protection of United States national interests from foreign security threats. All departments and agencies shall cooperate fully to fulfill this goal."

Books

Baker, John C. Mapping the Risks: Assessing Homeland Security Implications of Publicly Available Geospatial Information. Santa Monica, CA, Rand, 2004. 195 p.
Also available online at: http://www.rand.org/publications/MG/MG142/MG142.pdf
Book call no.: 363.3470285 M297

Davies, Matthew. Indonesian Security Responses to Resurgent Papuan Separatism: An Open Source Intelligence Case Study. Canberra, Australia, Strategic and Defense Studies Centre, Australian National University, 2001. 99 p.
Book call no.: 355.0218 D256i

Holden-Rhodes, J. F. Sharing the Secrets: Open Source Intelligence and the War on Drugs. Westport, CN, Praeger, 1997. 235 p.
Book call no.: 363.45 H726s

Documents

Bednar, Mark. A Study of Central Asia to Identify Future Threats to Regional Stability. Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2000. 35 p.
"The breakup of the former Soviet Union led to the independence of 11 states called the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). With all the positive attributes associated with this monumental event there are several challenges that threaten the security of the region. This paper will attempt to answer the question: what are the salient challenges to USCENTCOM inherent within the Central Asian states of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. Open source material provided the background information necessary to write this paper. Due to the fairly recent formation of the CIS there is not a large volume of information available on the subject matter. The Central Asian nations have much in common. They were occupied by former Tsarist Russia, then Communist Russia, the majority of their populations are Muslim, four of the five states speak a Turkic dialect and, of course they share common borders. Blended in with these and other similarities are several differences. The natural resources within the states varies widely depending on the state. The philosophies of the leadership and the needs of various ethnic and religious groups also deserve consideration. The United States National Military Strategy is used as a framework to view and analyze challenges in the region. Tajikistan and Turkmenistan have the greatest potential to challenge U.S. interests. The causes of the challenges are discussed as well as what can be done to decrease the chance of conflict occurring."
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA394054
Doc. call no.: M-U 43122 B412s

Brown, Christopher. Developing a Reliable Methodology for Assessing the Computer Network Operations Threat of North Korea. Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2004. 77 p.
"Computer network operations (CNO) can be considered a relatively new phenomenon being encount modern warfare. Computer network operation is comprised of three components, computer network attack computer network exploitation (CNE) , and computer network defense (CND). Computer network attack is defined as operations to disrupt, deny, degrade, or destroy information resident in computer networks, or the computers and themselves. Computer network exploitation is the intelligence collection and enabling operations to gather data from adversary automated information systems (AIS) or networks. Finally, computer network defense are those measures, internal to the protected entity, taken to protect and defend information, computers, and networks from disruption, degradation, or destruction. No longer is warfare limited to the use of kinetic weapons and conventional methods of war. Computer network operations have become an integral part of our adversary's arsenal and more attention must be paid to the effects of CNO activities, particularly CNA and CNE being conducted by our adversaries. Of the many states suspected of conducting active CNO activities against the United States and other nations, none warrants more attention than North Korea. This thesis presents the development of methodology using information available from open sources. This work is intended to prove that a useful methodology for assessing the CNO capabilities and limitations of North Korea can be developed using only open source information."
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA427292
Doc. call no.: M-U 42525 B8772d

Fields, Thomas J. Are the Soviets Talking About Tactical Intelligence in Their Open-Source Publications?. Garmisch, Germany, U.S. Army Russian Institute, June 1981. 22 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 43054 F463a

Hoopes, John M. Open Source Intelligence in Contingency Operations. Maxwell AFB, AL, Air command and Staff College, 2001. 34 p.
"This paper investigates use of open source information for intelligence support of joint-force short-term contingency operations, which often occur in areas of initially low classified collection priority. Intelligence personnel must turn first to open sources because other material is unavailable. This paper explores use of open sources in joint operations in Burundi and August 1999 humanitarian earthquake relief operation in Turkey. Three open source data sources are examined: the World Wide Web, individual academic or on-scene experts, and fee-based data providers. For Turkey, the Web provided the best imagery and background information, but it did not prove useful for planning purposes. Liaison and on-scene reports contained the most detailed planning and operational information. Fee-based data providers were not utilized at the time of the operation because no military organization provided or requested them. Finally the paper investigates better approaches to open sources. Examination of LEXIS-NEXIS news data shows that it would have considerably increased the knowledge available for initial orientation and mission planning. The paper finally explores ways to increase intelligence and operational use of LEXIS-NEXIS data by moving data to classified networks, using data feeds for message traffic servers, establishing open source research sites, and increasing subscription availability."
Doc. call no.: M-U 43122 H788o

Joint Military Intelligence Training Center (U.S.) Open Source Solutions Group. Open Source Intelligence: Professional Handbook. Washington, Joint Military Intelligence training Center, 1996.  307 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 44327

Kappes, Stephen A. Unlocking the Potential of Open Source Intelligence at the Operational Level. Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2000. 19 p.
"Open source intelligence (OSINT) is one of many intelligence disciplines used in the all-source analysis process. Although limited national and tactical level exploitation of open sources has been successful in the past, intelligence staffs and commands directly supporting joint force commanders at the operational level often neglect to fully consider and incorporate OSINT into their efforts. The reasons are numerous, ranging from biases favoring classified intelligence to futility in attempting to manage an ever-increasing volume of open source material. There are, however, many compelling reasons for pursuing and exploiting OSINT at the operational level. Easier and faster access to information via electronic databases and networks, alternatives offered by the private sector, the ability to share OSINT with coalition partners and civilian organizations, and its applicability in operations other than war make it a significant asset. Operational intelligence staffs and commands must recognize the increasing importance of OSINT and shift their collection and exploitation paradigms accordingly. Changes are warranted to take advantage of OSINT within Unified and Specified command intelligence programs, within theater joint intelligence centers, and within joint task force intelligence organizations. Likewise, joint intelligence doctrine must be revised to give OSINT greater legitimacy as a primary intelligence discipline."
Doc. call no.: M-U 41662 K17u

Mitzel, Dennis R. When Will We Listen?. Maxwell AFB, AL, Air War College, 1997. 37 p.
"A research report submitted to the faculty in partial fulfillment of the curriculum requirements." Includes bibliographical references (p. 36-37). "The purpose of this paper is to determine if there were indicators of the invasion of Kuwait by Iraq on 2 August 1990, that were not accurately assessed by allied decision makers in time to make a difference. Moreover, based on historical precedence, these indicators were hypothesized to be available from open (not classified) sources. Using only a small sampling of the public speeches of Saddam Hussein and the pronouncements in the Iraqi press as reported by the Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS), this research indicates the 2 August invasion should have been assessed as a near-certainty as early as 17 July. Furthermore, research of the memoirs of some the key participants as well as books chronicling the actions of decision makers during the weeks prior to the invasion, indicate that although the information identified during the research was available, it was dismissed as rhetoric rather than being recognized as indications of intent. Moreover, the research points to a continuing tendency by both analysts and decision makers to discount open-source pronouncements, even when they are congruent with empirical evidence from classified sources, because the decision makers and analysts believe the impending action would be "unthinkable."
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA399044
Doc. call no.: M-U 43117 M6851w

Open source Intelligence: Executive Briefing (CINC Brief). Fairfax, Va, Open Source solutions, Inc., 1999. 1 vol.
Doc. call no.: M-U 44326

Open Source Intelligence: Professional Handbook. Washington, Joint Military Intelligence Training Center, 1996. 307 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 44327

Open Source Intelligence: Reader 2.0. Fairfax, VA, Open Source Solutions, Inc, 1999. 1 vol.
Doc. call no.: M-U 44326-2

Seiferth, C. Justin. Open Source and These United States. Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 1999. 54 p.
"Over the past 40 years a collective form of systems development has evolved on the electronic networks of the world. In the wake of the information technology revolution has come a proven method for developing, deploying and maintaining these systems. This method, developed under the auspices of Department of Defense research grants, has resulted in the most successful and reliable software in existence. This method, based on collective intelligence, peer review and functional evolution, has rippled through the world of Information Technology. It depends on the uninhibited distribution of the currency of this realm: the source code, documentation and data which are the building blocks of these complex systems. The release of source code is commonly called open source licensing. The release of electronic information is known as open content licensing. Together, they comprise Open Licensing. There are significant gains to be realized through the formal adoption, support and use of open licensed systems by the Department of Defense. Secondary gains may be made in the morale and retention of Airmen involved in information technology. This adoption can take place at any point in the acquisition cycle and can even benefit deployed and operational systems. The benefits include reduced acquisition, development, maintenance and support costs and increased interoperability among our own systems and those of our Allies."
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA398898
Doc. call no.: M-U 43122 S4591o

Periodicals

Accessing the Full Range of Open Sources. International Journal of Intelligence & Counter Intelligence 17:183-192 Spring 2004.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&an=11650411

Bowen, Wyn. Open-Source Intel: A Valuable National Security Resource. Jane's Intelligence Review 11:50-54 November 1999.

Davis, John W. Open Source Information. Army 47:7-9 July 1997.

Davis, John W. Open-Source Information: The Wild Card of the Modern Battlefield. Military Intelligence 29:17-19 October-December 2003.

Deibert, Ronald J. Deep Probe: The Evolution of Network Intelligence. Intelligence & National Security 18:175-193 Winter 2003.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&an=13456802

Friedman, Richard S. Open Source Intelligence Parameters 28:159-165 Summer 1998.

Friedman, Richard S. Review Essay - Open Source Intelligence. Parameters 28:159-165 Summer 1998.
Also available online at: http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/documents/osint_review_parameters.htm

Gibson, Stevyn. Open Source Intelligence: An Intelligence Lifeline. RUSI Journal 149:16-22 February 2004.

Gwynne, Sam C. Spies Like Us. Time 153:48 January 25, 1999.
Examines how the Internet is changing the practice of espionage. Spying through so-called open-source intelligence; Spying done by Stratfor, Inc., Austin, Texas; Views of Stratfor president George Friedman; Stratfor's theory that recent United States bombings in Iraq were meant to cover up a failed coup attempt supported by the US; Previous accurate spying done by Stratfor.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=1449624

Holmes, H. Allen. Growing Importance of Open Sources Intelligence: Remarks at 3rd International Symposium on National Security and Natural Competitiveness Defense Issues 9:1-4 1994.

Hulnick, Arthur S. The Downside of Open Source Intelligence. International Journal of Intelligence & Counter Intelligence 15:565-580 Winter 2002-2003.
Discusses the negative aspects of open source intelligence (OSINT). Argument for the use of OSINT; Use of open media in disseminating disinformation; Inability of analysts to sort through the excess of OSINT; Concern on the use of the Internet for the technique of steganography or hidden writing; Inability of U.S. intelligence to interpret and understand intelligence data contained in obscure languages and tribal dialects.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&an=8580069

Nekoba, Barbara. Open Source Information and the Marine Corps. Marine Corps Gazette 81:38-40 June 1997.

Open Source Advantages Could Spark Intelligence Renaissance. Signal 48:45-47 April 1994.

Rathmell, Andrew and Valeri, Lorenzo. Implementing Open Source Intelligence. Jane's Intelligence Review 9:523-525 November 1997.

Steele, Robert D. Open Source Intelligence Clarifies Global Threats. Signal 47:65-67 September 1992.

Turbiville, Graham H. Assessing Emerging Threats Through Open Sources. Military Review 79:70-76 September-October 1999.

Wilson, Wade C. An Open-Source Overview of the Technical Intelligence Collection Threat in Asia. Military Intelligence 30:21-24 April-June 2004.


Signals Intelligence (SIGINT)


Internet Resources

 Kiknadze, V. G. The Dependence of Sigint Effectiveness on the Intensity of Enemy Radio Traffic (Based on Analysis of the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945). Military Thought 14:212-220 2005.
Presents a historical analysis of the development and combat employment of Soviet Navy signal intelligence in the Great Patriotic War in Russia. Dependence between the intensity of enemy radio communication traffic and the effectiveness of signals intelligence; Cause of signals intelligence; Increase in the number of radio stations and radio communication channels.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=16430227

Books

Ball, Desmond. Japanese Airborne SIGINT Capabilities. Canberra, Australia, Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Australian National University, 2000. 46 p.
Book call no.: 355.3432 B187j

Documents

Little, Jody. Application of Virtual User Interfaces for ELINT Analysis. Rome, NY, Rome Laboratory, April 1996. 43 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 43957 no. 96-48

Periodicals

Braden, Nate A. Marine Corps Signals Intelligence. Marine Corps Gazette 84:62-65 April 2000.

Cooperwood, Michael V. and Petrik, John F. The Precision SIGINT (Signals Intelligence) Targeting System. Military Intelligence 25:36-39 January-March 1999.

Cooperwood, Michael V. and Petrik, John F. Tactical Targets From National Assets: The Precision SIGINT (Signals Intelligence) Targeting System. Field Artillery 21-23 May-June 1999.

Cox, Matthew. Bringing Cold War Units into the Information Age. Army Times 63:16 January 20, 2003.

Friedman, Norman. Electronic Surveillance Becomes More Agile. U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings 128:4+ June 2002.

Friedman, Norman. Netting Radio and Sensors. U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings 128:6 June 2002.

Herskovitz, Don. Sampling of SIGINT (Signals Intelligence) Systems. Journal of Electronic Defense 21:51-59 July 1998.
Features signals-intelligence (SIGINT) systems that employ a range of approaches to detect and intercept battlefield radar and communications. National Reconnaissance Office's Galactic Radiation and Background Experiment; Boeing Co.'s Trumpet; Carnivore Diagnostic Tool.

Herskovitz, Don. A Sampling of SIGINT (Signals Intelligence) Systems. Journal of Electronic Defense 22:59-66 June 1999.

Marburger, Joan C. Defense Department Partners with Industry for Signals Intelligence. Signal 54:79-80 December 1999.

Minnick, Wendell. Briefing: US-Taiwanese Signals Intelligence. Jane's Defence Weekly 39:18-19+ January 22, 2003.

Moore, William K. MASINT (Measurement and Signatures Intelligence): New Eyes in the Battlespace. Military Intelligence 29:31-34+ January-March 2003.
Presents information on the measurement and signatures intelligence (MASINT) concept of operation (CONOP) used in the U.S. Army. Features of the MASINT CONOP; Importance of MASINT in identifying battlespace entities; Nature of tactical MASINTS; Benefits of MASINT to the field commander.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=9063767

Rockwell, David L. SIGINT: The New Electronic Warfare. Aerospace America 42:22-25 June 2004.
Looks at the potential of SIGINT or signals intelligence as a new electronic warfare. Components of SIGINT; Importance of each SIGINT component in military operations; Search for new funding that is programmed to develop SIGINT Systems.


Strategic Intelligence


Books

Dangerous Assumption: Preparing the U.S. Intelligence Warning System for the New Millenium, compiled, with an introduction by Jan Goldman. Washington, Joint Military Intelligence College, 2000. 119 p.
Book call no.: 355.3432 D182

Paradoxes of Strategic Intelligence: Essays in Honor of Michael I. Handel, edited by Richard K. Betts and Thomas G. Mahnken. Portland, OR, Frank Cass, 2003. 210 p.
Book call no.: 327.12 P222


Technical Intelligence (TECHINT)


Books

Bodnar, John W. Warning Analysis for the Information Age: Rethinking the Intelligence Process. Washington, Center for Strategic Intelligence Research, Joint Military Intelligence College, December 2003. 190 p.
Book call no.: 355.3432 B668w

Boni, William and Kovacich, Gerald L. Netspionage: The Global Threat to Information. Boston, MA, Butterworth Heinemann, 2000. 260 p.
Book call no.: 364.168 B715n

Mulhall, Douglas. Our Molecular Future: How Nanotechnology, Robotics, Genetics, and Artificial Intelligence Will Transform Our World. Amherst, NY, Prometheus Books, 2002. 392 p.
Book call no.: 303.483 M956o

Thomas, Troy S. Beneath the Surface: Intelligence Preparation of the Battlespace for Counterterrorism. Washington, Center for Strategic Intelligence Research, Joint Military Intelligence College, November 2004. 265 p.
Book call no.: 303.625 T462b

Documents

Bovy, Joseph J. Filling the Gaps: New Information Sources for Operational Commanders in Third World Countries. Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2002. 26 p.
"United States operational commanders have been increasingly tasked to conduct operations in Third World countries since the end of the Cold War in 1990. Despite this increased operational tempo, the U.S. Intelligence Community has had to realign its limited resources to higher priority countries and regions. The result of these two facts is increased intelligence gaps for commanders conducting their Joint Intelligence Preparation of the Battlespace (JIPB) for Third World operations. Commanders place their forces at greater risk if basing plans on an incomplete JIPB. United States Government agencies and Non-Governmental Organizations can provide relevant, open source, information to assist commanders in Third World military operations. These organizations are an unexploited source of easily accessed, relevant information. This available information can assist operational commanders in filling the gaps identified in the JIPB process. By filling these gaps, a more thorough intelligence estimate is prepared, a more suitable course of action is developed, and a more efficient military operation is conducted. The end result of utilizing open source information for operational commanders is increased operational efficiency and reduced risk to deploying forces."
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA401139
Doc. call no.: M-U 41662 B7831f

Cook, Paul J. Imagery and Measurement and Signatures Intelligence Support to Military Operations on Urbanized Terrain: A Monograph. Fort Leavenworth, KS, School of Advanced Military Studies, Army Command and General Staff College, 2003. 62 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA419915
Doc. call no.: M-P 42022-2 C771i

Cunningham, Kevin R. Bounded Rationality and Complex Process Coupling: Challenges for Intelligence Support to Information Warfare. Carlisle Barracks, PA, U.S. Army War College, 2000.  39 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 39080-537 C973b

Joint Doctrine for Electronic Warfare. Washington, Joint Chiefs of Staff, 2000. 1 vol.
Joint Publication 3-51.
Also available online at: http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/new%5Fpubs/jp3%5F51.pdf
Doc. call no.: M-U 40592 no. 3-51 2000 Apr. 7

Michael, James B. Phase II Report on Intelligent Software Decoys: Intelligent Software Decoy Tools for Cyber Counterintelligence and Security Countermeasures. Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2004. 16 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA422700
Doc. call no.: M-P 42525-196

Pham, Tuan N. Open Source Intelligence: Doctrine's Neglected Child. Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2003. 22 p.
"A paper submitted to the Faculty of the Naval War College in partial satisfaction of the requirements of the Department of Joint Military Operations." Includes bibliographical references (p. 15-22). "Of the seven intelligence disciplines, OSINT is least appreciated, understood, or employed by staffs and organizations supporting the operational commander despite past successes at the strategic and tactical levels. These staffs and organizations tend to favor classified collection methods and information, and neglect to consider and integrate OSINT into their efforts. The causes of this neglect are many, ranging from previously mentioned predisposition toward classified intelligence sources to the technical challenge of information excess that overloads the users with irrelevant information. Nonetheless, the main reason stems from inadequate joint doctrine on OSINT. Existing joint doctrine recognizes OSINT's value, but provides little guidance on employment. Additionally, doctrinal coverage is minimal relative to the other intelligence disciplines - suggestive of lesser value, and dissuading meaningful allocation of resources to OSINT. It is time to reconsider OSINT as an operational intelligence force and resource multiplier, and revise doctrine to reflect on the growing importance of OSINT in the all-source analysis process. Doctrine can no longer be vague; it must provide guidance to encourage meaningful allocation of resources to OSINT."
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA415569
Doc. call no.: M-U 41662 P534o

Periodicals

Ackerman, Robert K. Digitization Brings Quantum Growth in Geospatial Products. Signal 58:17-20 August 2004.

Alexander, Keith. Automating Markup of Intelligence Community Data: A Primer. Defense Intelligence Journal 12:83-96 2003.

Banks, Tony and Sweetman, Bill. Techint V Humint: The Unseen War. Jane's Defence Weekly 15:221 February 16, 1991.

Crawley, Vince. Intel Chief Sees Progress After Abu Ghraib Fallout: Army Emphasizes Technology, Tactics, People Skills. Army Times 65:30 October 25, 2004.
Reports on the recovery of U.S. forces in Iraq from the Abu Ghraib prison scandal and their emphasis on technology, tactics and people skills to counter insurgency in the country. Creation of procedures and tactics for combat units; Development of a concept for intelligence operations.

Fredericks, Brian and Wiersema, Richard. Battlefield TECHINT (Technical Intelligence): Support of Operations Desert Shield/Storm. Military Intelligence 18:13-19 April-June 1992.

Goodman, Glenn W. Net-Centric Trailblazer: Services Jointly Pursue 'Google'-Like Info-Sharing System. Defense News 19:42 March 8, 2004.

Goure, Dan. Special Report: The Changing Face of Modern Warfare --Coping with Chaos. Jane's Defence Weekly 35:22-26 January 17, 2001.

Haefner, John H. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as Assured Mobility Enablers. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 30:16-20 April-June 2004.
Presents a study on how people in the U.S. Army who are responsible for assured mobility can collaborate, examine and analyze a common geographic feature but retain those attributes specific to their trade. Language data requirements; Data elements that have current definitions in Military Specification or Standardized Agreement documentation; Integration into a Geographical Information System.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=14165400

Jones, Clive. 'A Reach Greater than the Grasp': Israeli Intelligence and the Conflict in South Lebanon 1990-2000. Intelligence & National Security 16:1-26 Autumn 2001.
Examines the way in which intelligence was used by Israel in its war against Hizb'allah in south Lebanon. Strategy, culture and intelligence of Israel; Intelligence structures of Israel in south Lebanon; Regime targeting and technical intelligence of Israel.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=sih&an=6903276

Macrakis, Kristie. Does Effective Espionage Lead to Success in Science and Technology? Lessons from the East German Ministry for State Security. Intelligence & National Security 19:52-77 Spring 2004.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&an=13456923

Matthews, William. War Reveals Shortcomings of Intelligence System. Army Times 64:20 April 19, 2004.
Announces that the war in Iraq has highlighted the U.S. military's shortcomings in intelligence systems, according to Keith Alexander, deputy chief of staff for intelligence. Factor that contribute to constraints in intelligence access; Areas of improvement needed in the intelligence system; Role of technologies in the Army's operations.

Menoher, Paul and McNicholas, Roger. The Intelligence and Electronic Warfare Tactical Proficiency Trainer - A Capability That is Long Overdue. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 30:43-47 April-June 2004.
Presents information on the Intelligence and Electronic Warfare Tactical Proficiency Trainer (IEWTPT) for intelligence training of the U.S. Army. Importance of training intelligence officers; Description of the training capability offered by IEWTPT; Process of operation of IEWTPT; Modes of operation to adjust training for various audiences.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=14165435

Researchers Leave Terrorists Nowhere to Hide. Signal 57:43-46 February 2003.

Sherman, Jason. Data-Mining Tool Kit Could Speed U.S. Intel. Defense News 19:21 June 7, 2004.

van Langenberg, Christina and Stultz, Richard D. Opening the Eyes of the Batlefield: MTOE (Modified Table of Organization and Equipment) Equipment Modifications for Conducting TUAV Operations in OIF (Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Operations in Operation Iraqi Freedom). Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 30:29-33 January-March 2004.
Discusses the modified table of organization and equipment systems modifications for conducting the U.S. Shadow 200 Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle(TUAV) operations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Description of the load plan to transport all TUAV equipment for air movement; Movement of the Shadow platoon; Use of computers in the TUAV platoon.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=12846440

Wilson, G. I. The Next Conflict. Marine Corps Gazette 85:73-76 November 2001.
Explores what lies ahead in future conflicts, and suggests ways to interface between military, public and private agencies involved with intelligence and information gathering to mitigate the impact of changes to how the world wages war; role of intelligence.

Wilson, Wade C. An Open-Source Overview of the Technical Intelligence Collection Threat in Asia. Military Intelligence 30:21-24 April-June 2004.


Unmanned Aerial Vehicles


Documents

Jordan, Tim.  Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: Role in Homeland Defense.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2003.  34 leaves.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 J824U

Monroe, Robert E.  A New Age of Armed Reconnaissance: A New Role for Predator.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2000.  344p.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 M7531n

Monson, Conrad B.  Human Systems Integration Requirements for Unmanned Reconnaissance and Combat Aerial Vehicle Systems.  Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, USAF Research Laboratory, 1999.  71p.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 44289-8 2000 no.0016

Trefz, John L.  From Persistent ISR to Precision Strikes:  The Expanding Role of UAVs.  Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2003.  24p.
Also available at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA420264
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41662 T786f

Periodicals

Burgess, Richard R. UAV Tests Its Sea Legs. Sea Power 48:12-14 May 2005.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=16854344

Butler, Amy and Fulghum, David A. New Frontiers. Aviation Week & Space Technology 162:22-24 March 7, 2005.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=16411100

Complete Guide:  Unmanned Air Vehicles.  Armada International 28:98 p supplement June-July 2004.

Cook, Nick. Briefing: ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance) -- Manned or Unmanned? Jane's Defence Weekly 40:22-25 November 19, 2003.

Fiorenza, Nicholas.  Born in the USA:  Germany Turns to American-Made for Open-Ocean Surveillance Aircraft.  C4ISR 4:40-41 April 2005.

Goodman, Glenn W.  Eavesdropping Drones:  U.S. Army Seeks Unmanned Signals-Intelligence Helicopters.  Defense News 19:20 September 20, 2004.

Kumble, Stephen.  Asia Eyes UAVs as Path to C4ISR and Network Centric Warfare.  Asian Defence Journal 11:32-34+ November 2004.

Lok, Joris Janssen.  Global Hawk Demonstration Success Takes ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance) Procurement One Step Closer.  Jane's International Defense Review 37:58-62 January 2004.

Ma, Jason.  Sea Sentinels:  UAVs Take on the Big Job of Ocean Surveillance.  Armed Forces Journal 143:34-35 August 2005.

O'Neill, Brendan.  America's "Eye in the Skies."  New Statesman 134:15 August 22, 2005.
Also available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17940778
Discusses how the United States military is using more unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to fight terrorists and insurgents than at any other time in recent history.  How these planes are controlled by fliers who are hundreds of miles from the battlefield; Numbers of UAVs in operation in Iraq; Description of several unmanned planes; Way that they are used to track insurgents, foil roadside bombings, protect U.S. convoys and even launch missile attacks against suspected insurgents; Role that these vehicles played in the Afghan war; Assertion that the U.S. is relying on unmanned planes heavily in Iraq, despite their dangers.

Sherman, Jason.  Competition Launched for Sea-Surveillance UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles).  Navy Times 53:28 April 19, 2004.

Sudbeck, Kevin J. End Manned Aerial Reonnaissance.  U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings 130:88 January 2004.

Tirpak, John A. Expanding the UAV Horizon. Air Force Magazine 88:11 April 2005.


History of Intelligence


Books

Andrew, Christopher M. For the President's Eyes Only: Secret Intelligence and the American Presidency from Washington to Bush. New York, HarperCollins Publishers, 1995. 660 p.
Book call no.: 327.1273 A562f

Binney, Marcus. The Women Who Lived for Danger: The Agents of the Special Operations Executive. New York, HarperCollins Publishers, 2002. 380 p.
Book call no.: 940.548641 B614w

Fenn, Charles. At the Dragon's Gate: With the OSS in the Far East. Annapolis, MD, Naval Institute Press, 2004. 226 p.
Book call no.: 940.548673 F334a

Ford, Christopher A. The Admirals' Advantage: U.S. Navy Operational Intelligence in World War II and the Cold War. Annapolis, MD, Naval Institute Press, 2005. 219 p.
Book call no.: 359.34320973 F699a

Hodgson, Lynn Philip. Inside Camp X. Port Perry, Ontario, Canada, Blake Book Distribution, 2002.    375 p.
Book call no.: 940.548641 H691i

Jakub, Jay. Spies and Saboteurs: Anglo-American Collaboration and Rivalry in Human Intelligence Collection and Special Operations, 1940-45. New York, St. Martin's Press, 1999. 280 p.
Book call no.: 940.5486 J25a

Kahn, David. The Reader of Gentlemen's Mail: Herbert O. Yardley and the Birth of American Codebreaking. New Haven, CN, Yale University Press, 2004. 318 p.
Book call no.: 92 Y27k

Keegan, John. Intelligence in War: Knowledge of the Enemy from Napoleon to al-Qaeda.. New York, Knopf, 2003. 387 p.
Book call no.: 355.3432 K26i

MacPherson, Nelson. American Intelligence in War-Time London: The Story of the OSS. Portland, OR, Frank Cass, 2003. 304 p.
Book call no.: 940.548673 M172a

Powers, Thomas. Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to al-Qaeda. New York, New York Review Books, 2004. 504 p.
Book call no.: 327.1273 P888i 2004

Proctor, Tammy M. Female Intelligence: Women and Espionage in the First World War. New York, New York University Press, 2003. 205 p.
Book call no.: 940.48641082 P964f

Secet Intelligence in the Twentieth Century, edited by Heike Bungert. Portland, OR, Frank Cass, 2003. 200 p.
Book call no.: 327.120904 S446

Stephan, Robert W. Stalin's Secret War: Soviet Counterintelligence Against the Nazis, 1941-1945. Lawrence, KS, University Press of Kansas, 2004. 349 p.
Book call no.: 940.548647 S827s

Taubman, Philip. Secret Empire: Eisenhower, the CIA, and the Hidden Story of America's Space Espionage. New York, Simon & Schuster, 2003. 441 p.
Book call no.: 327.1273 T222s

Theoharis, Athan G. The FBI & American Democracy: A Brief Critical History. Lawrence, KS, University Press of Kansas, 2004. 195 p.
Book call no.: 363.250973 T391f

Vernon A. Walters: Pathfinder of the Intelligence Profession: Conference Proceedings 3 June 2004, edited by Russell Swenson. Washington, Joint Military Intelligence College, 2004. 82 p.
Book call no.: 355.34320973 V539

Wilford, Hugh. The CIA, the British Left and the Cold War: Calling the Tune?, foreword by David Caute. Portland, OR, Frank Cass, 2003. 328 p.
Book call no.: 327.1273041 W677c

Documents

Kneafsey, David B. The Combatant Commander and Effective Operational HUMINT: Lessons From the Double Cross System of World War II and the CJ2X of Operation Joint Guard. Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2003. 1 vol.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA420278
Doc. call no.: M-P 41662 K681c

Norwitz, Jeffrey H. Leveraging Operational Intelligence: The Battle of Tannenberg and Masurian Lakes (1914). Newport,RI, Naval War College, 2001. 27 p.
Also available online at:
http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA393520
Doc. call no.: M-U 41662 N893L

Periodicals

Foot, M. R. D. What Use was SOE (Special Operations Executive)? RUSI Journal 148:76-83 February 2003.


War on Terror


Internet Resources

Robeson, Paul. Bush vs. Powell and Rice New York Amsterdam News  April 15, 2004.
President Bush launched what he called a preemptive war. The "War on Terror" is a figure of speech, such as "war against fear" or "war on poverty" or "war against drugs." The key military component of such a program is a strong" Special Operations" capability that relies on Military Intelligence, rather than primarily on the CIA or the FBI.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/direct.asp?an=12857739&db=aph

Books

Gertz, Bill. Breakdown: The Failure of American Intelligence to Defeat Global Terror. New York, Plume, 2003. 284 p.
Book call no.: 973.931 G384b

Hulnick, Arthur S. Keeping Us Safe: Secret Intelligence and Homeland Security. Westport, CN, Praeger, 2004. 258 p.
Book call no.: 363.320973 H915k

Kessler, Ronald. The CIA at War: Inside the Secret Campaign Against Terror. New York, St. Martin's Press, 2003. 362 p.
Book call no.: 973.931 K22c

Documents

Michael, James B. Phase II Report on Intelligent Software Decoys: Intelligent Software Decoy Tools for Cyber Counterintelligence and Security Countermeasures. Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2004. 16 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA422700
Doc. call no.: M-P 42525-196

Wishart, Eric. Intelligence Networks and the Tri Border Area of South America: The Dilemma of Efficiency Versus Oversight. Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2002. 95 p.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA411244
Doc. call no.: M-U 42525 W8141i

Periodicals

Berkowitz, Bruce. Intelligence for the Homeland. SAIS Review 24:1-6 Winter-Spring 2004.
Argues that the U.S. still lacks adequate homeland intelligence. As a result, we are still ill prepared to detect, analyze, and monitor foreign threats inside our borders.

Danskine, William B. Aggressive ISR in the War on Terrorism. Air & Space Power Journal 19:73-83 Summer 2005.
This article proposes a strategy to disrupt global terrorist groups by employing airborne intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance missions to deny them sanctuary in weak states. The author argues against placing too much attention upon network-centric warfare and too little upon traditional strategic reconnaissance. Intelligence projection may prove more important than force projection in a global counterterrorism strategy. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17204382

Friedman, George. No Easy Battle. Officer 77:27-28 October 2001.

Fulghum, David A. Shooting Images. Aviation Week & Space Technology 162:53-54 May 23, 2005.
The article reports that the U.S. Air Force F-15Es in the Gulf region are flying on a mission they were never designed for, and it has drawn louder praise from the ground forces than their bomb dropping. The job is called non-traditional ISR (intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance). That means the strike aircraft's package of sensors, designed to precisely place a weapon, is now being used to track insurgent gunmen and messengers or those who plant bombs and plan ambushes. The ultimate goal is not to attack them, but to follow them to safe houses, weapons stores and to others in their network.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17194307

Intelligence Evolves to Counter Threats. Jane's Terrorism & Security Monitor 11-12 February 2005.

Kucera, Joshua. US Recognises the Value of Sharing. Jane's Defence Weekly 42:4 February 16, 2005.

McCue, Colleen. Data Mining and Predictive Analytics: Battlespace Awareness for the War on Terrorism. Defense Intelligence Journal 13:47-63 2005.

Morgan, Matthew J. Civilians on the CTC (Combat Training Center) Battlefield--Threat, Opportunity, or Distraction? Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 29:49-51 January-March 2003.
Focuses on the civilian role-players at the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC) in Fort Polk, Louisiana. Background of civilians opposing force at JRTC; Importance of civilians in providing an opportunity in counterintelligence endeavor; Challenges in exploiting civilians on the battlefield.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=9063772

O'Brien, Kevin and Nusbaum, Joseph. Intelligence Collection for Asymmetric Threats, part 2. Jane's Intelligence Review 12:50-55 November 2000.

Risen, James. How Pair's Finding on Terror Led to Clash on Shaping Intelligence. New York Times, pA1, Op, April 28, 2004.
Examines how a two-man U.S. Pentagon intelligence unit created after September 11, 2001, reported an increasingly unified Islamic terrorist threat and links between Iraq and Al Qaeda. Efforts of Michael Maloof and Douglas J. Feith Defense Intelligence Agency to track links between terrorists and host countries; Warning that ethnic, religious and political divides between terrorist groups were breaking down; Controversy over their findings; Investigation by the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence whether the unit exaggerated the threat posed by Iraq to justify the war; Contention of other intelligence agencies that they found little evidence to support the group's findings; Resistance from the Central Intelligence Agency and the Defense Intelligence Agency to the unit; The team's briefing for Paul D. Wolfowitz, deputy secretary of defense; Questions over the terrorism link.

Scales, Robert H. Culture-Centric Warfare. U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings 130:32-36 October 2004.
Transformation has been interpreted as exclusively technological, but against an enemy who fights unconventionally — as this civil military operations team faced in Afghanistan — it is more important to understand motivation, intent, method, and culture than to have a few more meters of precision, knots of speed, or bits of bandwidth. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=14675607

Smith, Michael. Intelligence-Sharing Failures Hamper War on Terrorism. Jane's Intelligence Review 17:20-24 July 2005.

Stallings, Ron and Foley, Michael. CI(Counterintelligence) and HUMINT (Human Intelligence) Operations in Support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 29:43-46 October-December 2003.
Discusses the value of counterintelligence (CI) and human intelligence (HUMINT) operations during Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan in 2003. Assessment of tactical CI and interrogation operations; List of CI and HUMINT lessons learned.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=11815853


Homeland Defense


Books

Dangerous Assumption: Preparing the U.S. Intelligence Warning System for the New Millenium, compiled, with an introduction by Jan Goldman. Washington, Joint Military Intelligence College, 2000. 119 p.
Book call no.: 355.3432 D182

Hulnick, Arthur S. Keeping Us Safe: Secret Intelligence and Homeland Security. Westport, CN, Praeger, 2004. 258 p.
Book call no.: 363.320973 H915k

Intelligence and National Security., Aldrich, Richard J. Portland, OR, Frank Cass, 2000. 298 p.
Book call no.: 327.127305 C587

Documents

Fletcher, Barbara. Autonomous Vehicles and the Net-Centric Battlespace. San Diego, CA, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, 2002. 1 vol.
"The horrific terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 on the U.S. homeland highlighted the threat that terrorism poses to U.S. national security. DoD operates globally a large network of Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) assets which could be brought to bear in the effort to combat terrorism. The geographic Commander's-in-Chief(CINCs) set the priorities for the intelligence networks in their Areas of Responsibility (AORs) according to their interpretation of the strategic guidance from the National Command Authority (NCA). A key tenet of the new strategic setting is the grave threat to national security posed by terrorism, potentially using Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, or Enhanced High Explosive (CBRNE) weapons. This fact, coupled with the new strategic mandate that sets defense of the homeland as the highest priority for the U.S. military, dictates that each of the geographic CINCs set combatting terrorist use of CBRNE weapons as the highest priority for their intelligence networks. The success or failure of this operational intelligence effort could have major strategic effects."
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA397125
Doc. call no.: M-U 44451-1

Periodicals

Duncklee, Elizabeth M. and McKnight, Jeremy J. CI (Counterintelligence) Technical Capabilities for Homeland Security. Military Intelligence 28:21 July-September 2002.


Iraq War 2003


Internet Resources

 Wilson, J. R. UAVs Poised to Take the Next Step into Combat. Military & Aerospace Electronics June 2005.
Available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17396004
Focuses on the use of new generation of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and unmanned combat aerial vehicles (UCAV) by the U.S. Navy and Air Force. Efficacy of unmanned aerial vehicles during the Persian Gulf War of 1991 and 2003; Difficulties in deploying these aircrafts; Significance of UAV and UCAV for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance or lethal missions.

Books

United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Intelligence. Report of the Select Committee on Intelligence on the U.S. Intelligence Community's Prewar Intelligence Assessments on Iraq. Report. 108th Congress, 2nd session, July 9, 2004. Washington, GPO, 2004. 511 p.
Book call no.: 956.70443 U581r

Periodicals

Boyne, Sean and Blanche, Ed. Iraqi Intelligence Agencies Face Uphill Struggle. Jane's Intelligence Review 17:38-43 January 2005.

Cook, Nick. Briefing: ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance) -- Manned or Unmanned? Jane's Defence Weekly 40:22-25 November 19, 2003.

Corera, Gordon. What the Guantanamo Captives Know. Jane's Intelligence Review 14:48-51 July 2002.

Erwin, Sandra I. Army Trying to Get Better Grasp on War Zone Intelligence. National Defense 89:18 October 2004.

Frank, Mitch. 4 Dots American Intelligence Failed to Connect. Time 163:30-31 April 26, 2004.
Discusses four crucial cases where mishandled intelligence, bureaucratic confusion and legal hurdles blinded the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency and Federal Bureau of Investigation to clues leading to the September 11, 2001 attacks. Conspiracy of al-Qaeda members in Manila, the Philippines, led by Ramzi Yousef, to blow up airplanes; Meeting in Malaysia between two 9/11 hijackers; Memo that was sent to the FBI by Phoenix, Arizona agent Kenneth Williams; Flight training of Frenchman Zacarias Moussaoui.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/direct.asp?an=12845765&db=aph

Gaynor, Michael J. ASAS (All-Source Analysis System) Contributions to Operation Iraqi Freedom. Military Intelligence 29:29-30+ October-December 2003.

Gellman, Brian. Lessons Learned from OIF: An SF (Special Forces) Battalion S2's Perspective. Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin 30:35-42 April-June 2004.
Focuses on observations on the tactical, operational and strategic levels of intelligence from Operation IRAQI FREEDOM (OIF) of the U.S. Army. Overview of networking by intelligence officers in OIF; Tips for intelligence officers on establishing credibility and rapport with their commanders; Stages of the cycle of information operation; Discussion of information dissemination; Standards for reporting intelligence assessments.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&an=14165431

J. J. L. Precision-Strike Limitations Lead Air Forces to Network Priorities. Jane's International Defense Review 38:4 July 2005.
Focuses on the message delivered by British Air Marshall Brian Burridge on the emphasis of modern Western air forces on building network-enabled capabilities. Advantages of air power during military operations; Lessons learned from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq; Plans for the British intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance strategy.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&an=17506240

Powers, Thomas. The Failure. New York Review of Books 51:4-6 April 29, 2004.
Focuses on the crisis facing the United States Central Intelligence Agency as the result of a White House-directed campaign to justify the overthrow of Iraq President Saddam Hussein by citing intelligence reports of Iraqi stockpiles of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and accelerating programs to build more. Failure of the CIA team to find any WMD stockpiles in Iraq; Challenges facing the Senate investigating committee on explaining how the evidence of Iraqi WMD was used by President George W. Bush and his advisers to launch an urgent war against Iraq.

Risen, James. How Pair's Finding on Terror Led to Clash on Shaping Intelligence. New York Times, pA1, Op, April 28, 2004.
Examines how a two-man U.S. Pentagon intelligence unit created after September 11, 2001, reported an increasingly unified Islamic terrorist threat and links between Iraq and Al Qaeda. Efforts of Michael Maloof and Douglas J. Feith Defense Intelligence Agency to track links between terrorists and host countries; Warning that ethnic, religious and political divides between terrorist groups were breaking down; Controversy over their findings; Investigation by the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence whether the unit exaggerated the threat posed by Iraq to justify the war; Contention of other intelligence agencies that they found little evidence to support the group's findings; Resistance from the Central Intelligence Agency and the Defense Intelligence Agency to the unit; The team's briefing for Paul D. Wolfowitz, deputy secretary of defense; Questions over the terrorism link.

Where is Defense HUMINT (Human Intelligence) in America's New War? Defense Intelligence Journal 11:81-89 Winter 2002.


Persian Gulf War, 1991


Internet Resources

Wilson, J. R. UAVs Poised to Take the Next Step into Combat. Military & Aerospace Electronics June 2005.
Available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17396004
Focuses on the use of new generation of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and unmanned combat aerial vehicles (UCAV) by the U.S. Navy and Air Force. Efficacy of unmanned aerial vehicles during the Persian Gulf War of 1991 and 2003; Difficulties in deploying these aircrafts; Significance of UAV and UCAV for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance or lethal missions.

Documents

Marshall, Larry R. Imagery Dissemination: Have We Fixed the Problems of Desert Storm?. Newport, RI, Naval War College, 1998. 25 p.
Doc. call no.: M-U 41662 M368i

Periodicals

Fredericks, Brian and Wiersema, Richard. Battlefield TECHINT (Technical Intelligence): Support of Operations Desert Shield/Storm. Military Intelligence 18:13-19 April-June 1992.

J. J. L. Precision-Strike Limitations Lead Air Forces to Network Priorities. Jane's International Defense Review 38:4 July 2005.
Focuses on the message delivered by British Air Marshall Brian Burridge on the emphasis of modern Western air forces on building network-enabled capabilities. Advantages of air power during military operations; Lessons learned from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq; Plans for the British intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance strategy.
Also available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&an=17506240

Videos

The Gulf War Secrets in the Sand. Alexandria, VA, Time-Life Video, 1999. 1 videocassette (50 min).
AUL Video 956.70442 G9719


Personal Narratives


Books

Hamrick, S. J. Deceiving the Deceivers: Kim Philby, Donald Maclean and Guy Burgess. New Haven, CT, Yale University Press, 2004. 297 p.
Book call no.: 327.1247041 T985d

Hitz, Frederick Porter. The Great Game: The Myth and Reality of Espionage. New York, Alfred A. Knopf, 2004. 211 p.
Book call no.: 823.087 H676g

Kolb, Larry J. Overworld: The Life and Times of a Reluctant Spy. New York, Riverhead Books, 2004.     465 p.
Book call no.: 327.12730092 K81o

Smith, I. C. Inside: A Top G-Man Exposes Spies, Lies, and Bureaucratic Bungling Inside the FBI. Nashville, TN, Nelson Current, 2004. 304 p.
Book call no.: 363.250973 S649i

Sullivan, John F. Of Spies and Lies: A CIA Lie Detector Remembers Vietnam. Lawrence, KS, University Press of Kansas, 2002. 250 p.
Book call no.: 959.70438 S949o


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