SPACE
Special Bibliography  No. 329


June 2006

Compiled by Bibliography Branch
Muir S. Fairchild Research Information Center
Maxwell AFB, AL


Contents

The appearance of hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Air Force of this web site or the information, products, or services contained therein.  For other than authorized activities such as military exchanges and morale, welfare and recreation sites, the U.S. Air Force does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at these locations.  Such links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of this DoD web site.

Some materials listed below require access to subscription databases.  If you cannot gain access, contact your local library for availability.  AU students and faculty can contact the Center's Web Maintainer for a password.

All sites listed were last accessed on June 13, 2006.


Internet Resources

Bibliographies| Doctrine| Online Journals| Organizations| Reports


Bibliographies

Directed Energy Weapons, compiled by Greta Marlatt.  Monterey, CA, Dudley Knox Library, Naval Postgraduate School, September 1998.
Available online at:  http://library.nps.navy.mil/home/bibs/dewtoc.htm

Space:  Military Aspects, compiled by Terry Hawkins.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air University Library, December 2000.
Available online at:  http://www.au.af.mil/au/aul/bibs/milspace.htm

Space-Based Weapons, compiled by Stephanie Rollins.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air University Library, August 2003.
Available online at:  http://www.au.af.mil/au/aul/bibs/spaceb/space.htm
 

Doctrine

Air Force Doctrine Document 2-2.1:  Counterspace Operations.  2 August 2004.
Available online at:  http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/service_pubs/afdd2_2_1.pdf

Air Force Doctrine Document 2-2:  Space Operations.  27 November 2001.
Available online at:  http://www.e-publishing.af.mil/pubfiles/af/dd/afdd2-2/afdd2-2.pdf

Field Manual 100-18:  Space Support to Army Operations.  20 July 1995.
Available online at:  https://atiam.train.army.mil/soldierPortal/atia/adlsc/view/public/9383-1/fm/100-18/f0018.htm

Joint Publication 3-14:  Joint Doctrine for Space Operations.  9 August 2002.
Available online at:  http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/new_pubs/jp3_14.pdf

Online Journals

Air Force Space Command.  High Frontier Journal
Available online at:  http://www.afspc.af.mil/library/highfrontierjournal.asp

Air University.  Air & Space Power Journal
Available online at:  http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/apje.html

The Space Review:  Essays and Commentary about the Final Frontier
Available online at:  http://www.thespacereview.com/
Devoted to articles, commentary, and reviews regarding all aspects of space exploration:  science, technology, policy, business, and more.

SpaceToday.net:  Space News from Around the Web
Available online at:  http://www.spacetoday.net/
Provides links to space news articles from throughout the web, on topics ranging from astronomy and space science to technology to policy and legislation. Also provides one-paragraph summaries of current space news.

Organizations

Air Force Space Command
Available online at:  http://www.afspc.af.mil/

Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command
Available online at:  http://www.smdc.army.mil/

Dept. of Defense.  Missile Defense Agency. 
Available online at:  http://www.mda.mil/mdalink/html/mdalink.html

National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Available online at:  http://www.nasa.gov/home/index.html?skipIntro=1

National Reconnaissance Office
Available online at:  http://www.nro.gov/

National Space Studies Center
Available online at:  http://space.au.af.mil/
Provides links to reports, articles, doctrinal publications, space organizations, and more.

Naval Network Warfare Command
Available online at:  https://ekm.netwarcom.navy.mil/netwarcom/nnwc-nipr/index.htm

Spaceflight Now:  Worldwide Launch Schedule
Available online at:  http://spaceflightnow.com/tracking/index.html
A regularly updated listing of planned missions from spaceports around the globe. Dates and times are given in Greenwich Mean Time.

U. S. Strategic Command
Available online at:  http://www.stratcom.mil/

Reports

Air Force Space Command.  Strategic Master Plan FY06 and Beyond.  Peterson AFB, CO, October 2003.  46 p. 
Available online at:  http://www.wslfweb.org/docs/Final%2006%20SMP--Signed!v1.pdf

Air University Space Primer.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air University, August 2003.
Available online at:  http://space.au.af.mil/primer/index.htm

Defense Science Board Task Force on the Future of the Global Positioning System.  Washington, October 2005.  109 p. 
Available online at:  http://www.acq.osd.mil/dsb/reports/2005-10-GPS_Report_Final.pdf

Report of the Commission to Assess United States National Security Space Management and Organization.  [Washington], January 11, 2001.
Available online at:  http://www.defenselink.mil/pubs/space20010111.html


Commercial Space


Books

Billingslea, Rachel E., Domsalla, Matthew, and Payne, Brian C.  The National Reconnaissance Office:  A Strategy for Addressing the Commercialization of Satellite Imagery.  Cambridge, MA, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, 1999.  55 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA366610
Book call no.:  621.3678 B598n

Butterworth, Robert Lyle.  Growing the Space Industrial Base:  Policy Pitfalls and Prospects.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air University Press, 2000.  29 p. (Maxwell paper; 23)
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA383943

http://www.au.af.mil/au/aul/aupress/Maxwell_Papers/Text/mp23.pdf
Book call no.:  338.0919 B988g

Carey, Steven D.  An Executive Guide to Space:  A Starting Point for Understanding Space in the New Millennium.  Santa Monica, CA, Rand, 2000.  68 p.
Book call no.:  358.80973 C276e

Commercial Observation Satellites:  At the Leading Edge of Global Transparency, edited by John C. Baker and others.  Santa Monica, CA, Rand, 2001.  643 p.
Book call no.:  327.17 C7341

Keeley, James F. and Huebert, Robert N.  Commercial Satellite Imagery, and United Nations Peacekeeping:  A View From Above.  Burlington, VT , Ashgate, 2004.  251 p.
Book call no.:  327.12 C734

Space Policy in the Twenty-First Century, edited by W. Henry Lambright.  Baltimore, MD, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003.  283 p.
Reminding readers of historical highlights, the authors pose questions about the priorities and applications of space science, manned vs. unmanned flights, and commercial access to the space enterprise.
Book call no.:  629.40973 S7321

Weeks, E. E.  Outsiders' Guide to Understanding Outer Space Development.  [Philadelphia, PA], Xlibris, 2004.  189 p.
Book call no.:  341.47 W395

Documents

Cooney, William T.  Protecting Critical Space Systems:  A National Security Issue.  Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2002.  (unpaged)
Examines such questions as:  what is the 'real' impact of commercial space on the U.S. economy and military capability? How would loss of commercial space capabilities impact U.S. war fighting capability? What constitutes an attack on a commercial space system? How do we detect and deter an attack?
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA405817
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41662 C7752p

Hoffman, Everett Scott.  The Commercial Space Segment and the Need for Control.  Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2002.  22 p.
It is vital that the United States maintain a position of information superiority across the spectrum of military operations. The access to commercial satellite systems will be a critical but challenging element of that advantage.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA405648
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41662 H699c

Miller, Dennis M.  Commercialization of Space Systems:  Policy Implications for the United States.  Newport, RI, Naval War College, Center for Naval Warfare Studies, 2001.  103 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA393920
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41662-6 M6471c

Petras, Christopher M.  The Convergence of U.S. Military and Commercial Space Activities:  Self-Defense and Cyber-Attack, "Peaceful Use" and the Space Station, and the Need for Legal Reform. Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, Air Force Institute of Technology, 2001.  130 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA401756
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39567-5 P943c

Rider, Douglas B.  Establishing a Commercial Reserve Imagery Fleet:  Obtaining Surge Imagery Capacity from Commercial Remote Sensing Satellite Systems during Crisis.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2000.  51 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA394938
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 R544e

Periodicals

Buenneke, Richard H.  Protection of Commercial Satellite Communications Infrastructure.  Astropolitics 2:237-259 Summer 2004.

Caceres, Marco.  Creating a Space Exploration Industry.  Aerospace America 43:10-12 August 2005.

Caceres, Marco.  Launch Market Takes a Wrong Turn.  Aerospace America 43:12-13 February 2005.
Fewer than 60 launch missions were attempted in 2004.  Part of the problem continues to be a relative lack of commercial satellites available for launch.

Caceres, Marco.  Looking to the Past for Satellite Predictions.  Aerospace America 43:16+ June 2005.
Provides some insights into developments in the world satellite market, and an overview of satellites launched from 1995 to 2004.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17300236

Caceres, Marco.  Uptick in GEO Commercial Satellite Orders.  Aerospace America 44:20-22 May 2006.
217 commercial satellites were launched (or had attempted launches) worldwide during 1996-2005. Authors forecast that approximately 176 will be built and launched during 2006-2015.  A graph illustrates these statistics.

Calvert, Ken.  Exploration Needs Commercial Space Transportation.  Aviation Week & Space Technology 162:66 February 21, 2005.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=798817361&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Dietrich, George B. and Goldstein, William C.  Collective Trusteeship for Near Space:  The Case for UNNESA.  Space Policy 14:9-14 February 1998.
Examines the need to determine what source of legal authority will govern commercial activities in space development activity.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=887833

Hancock, Randy.  Provisions of the Commercial Space Launch Act (CSLA).  Space Policy 21:227-229 August 2005.
The CSLA was enacted to assist the development of commercial, including passenger-carrying, launch vehicles.

Hewish, Mark.  Military Users Embrace Commercial Satcom Services.  Jane's International Defence Review 37:52-60 November 2004.

Morring, Frank Jr.  Moon-Bound, Again.  Aviation Week & Space Technology 163:22-24 September 26, 2005.
Continued strong US leadership in human spaceflight is the stated goal of NASA's tightly focused new plan for lunar exploration.  The plan also includes seed money for a complete new commercial space industry.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=904067941&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Red Planet.  Government Executive 38:11 March 15, 2006.
NASA envisions its new Red Planet Capital as "an investment vehicle used to support innovative, dual-use technologies which will help NASA achieve its mission, but will also help better position these technologies for future commercial use."
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1012464081&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Searfoss, Richard.  Commercial Space:  Is NASA All Talk and No Action?  Ad Astra 18:28-29 Spring 2006.
NASA has begun to see the promise of working with small, pay-for-performance outfits to further space exploration.

Smith, Patricia Grace.  Commercial Human Space Flight.  Vital Speeches of the Day 71:756-759 October 1, 2005.
According to Smith, there are three big questions surrounding commercial human space flight :  1) Do policy makers in the US take it seriously?  2) Is there a market?  3) How will commercial human space flight affect commercial space transportation?
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=940794801&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Williams, Mark.  Private Space.  Technology Review 109:80-81+ March-April 2006.
If NASA hopes to send more Americans into space within the Bush administration's budget, it will need to tap into new ideas from the commercial realm -- where money is an object.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1011348571&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD


International Cooperation


Books

Oberg, James E.  Star-Crossed Orbits:  Inside the U.S.- Russian Space Alliance.  New York , McGraw-Hill, 2002.  355 p
Book call no.:  629.40973 O12s

Documents

Gleason, Donald L.  Geopolitical Aspects of Weaponizing Space.  Carlisle Barracks, PA, Army War College, 2002.  31 p.
As the United States political and military leaders explore weaponizing space, many questions arise. What is the threat to space-based assets?  What are the options to counter those threats?  The author examines diplomacy as an alternate option.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA400790
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39080-537 G554g

Periodicals

Blamont, Jacques.  International Space Exploration:  Cooperative or Competitive?  Space Policy 21:89-92 May 2005.

Boutwell, Jeffrey, Hitchens, Teresa, and Moltz, James Clay.  Enhancing Space Security by Improving Stakeholder Cooperation.  Astropolitics 2:99-106 Summer 2004.

Correll, Randall R.  Military Space Cooperation:  Aligning the Balance of Power and Building Common Interest.  Astropolitics 2:133-147 Summer 2004.

da Silva, Darly Henriques.  Brazilian Participation in the International Space Station (ISS) Program:  Commitment or Bargain Struck?  Space Policy 21:55-63 February 2005.

Ito, Atsuyo.  Issues in the Implementation of the International Charter on Space and Major Disasters.  Space Policy 21:141-149 May 2005.
The 2000 Disaster Charter is an extensive international cooperative effort among space agencies to provide space-based assets to communities worldwide that are affected by disasters.

Johnson-Freese, Joan.  Space Wei Qi:  The Launch of Shenzhou V.  Naval War College Review 57:121-145 Spring 2004.
Argues that the US can continue to exclude China from cooperative space efforts, commence a new manned-space-flight race, or initiate an incremental program of space cooperation including the Chinese.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=649155471&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Larson, George C.  Leroy's Launch.  Air & Space Smithsonian 20:40+ June-July 2005.
Reports on the launch of US astronaut Leroy Chiao with cosmonaut Salizhan Sharipov to bring Expedition 10 to the International Space Station on board Russia's Soyuz space vehicle in October 2004.

Macaulay, Molly K.  Is the Vision of the Earth Observation Summit Realizable?  Space Policy 21:29-39 February 2005.

Martel, William C. and Yoshihara, Toshi.  Averting a Sino-U.S. Space Race.  Washington Quarterly 26:19-36 Autumn 2003.

Mathews, Neelam and others.  Easing Exports.  Aviation Week & Space Technology 164:26-27 March 13, 2006.
India's nascent commercial space-launch industry could get a boost under new bilateral agreements that should clear US export-control roadblocks for spacecraft and their components.  The State Dept has cleared two US instruments to fly on the Chandrayaan-1 lunar orbiter next year, and India has agreed to share the data from its own instruments on the orbiter with US scientists.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1004244471&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Riess, Cornelia.  A New Setting for International Space Cooperation?  Space Policy 21:49-53 February 2005.

Sabathier, Vincent.  Once Bitten, Twice Shy.  Ad Astra 17:26-43 Winter 2005.
Assesses whether the multi-polar World Vision Model promoted by countries from Europe and Asia will apply to space exploration.

Sadeh, Eligar.  Technical, Organizational and Political Dynamics of the International Space Station Program.  Space Policy 20:171-188 August 2004.
Analyzes the dynamics of cooperation on the International Space Station (ISS) program from its inception in 1981 to the final Framework Agreements for cooperation concluded in 1998.

Sarkissian, John M.  Return to the Moon:  A Sustainable Strategy.  Space Policy 22:118-127 May 2006.
Explores how the President's space initiative can be realized on an international co-operative basis along similar lines to those already existing with the international space station.

Savelyev, Alexander G.  Prospects for US-Russian Cooperation in Ballistic Missile Defense and Outer Space Activities.  Journal of Slavic Military Studies 17:99-109 March 2004.

Wortzel, Larry M.  The Rules of Engagement:  The Russia Model.  Ad Astra 17: 24-25 Spring 2005.
China has embarked on an ambitious program to compete with the US in both the civil and military aspects of space exploration.  Concerns about China's military intentions have led many Americans to question whether the US should cooperate with China on civil space programs.

Zaborsky, Victor.  Missile Proliferation Risks of International Space Cooperation.  World Affairs 165:185-196 Spring 2003.
Examines the co-relation of civilian and military space programs, as well as missile proliferation risks that accompany transfers of sensitive rocket technologies.  Zaborsky discusses the programs of four countries that have already achieved some success in building orbital launch vehicles:  China, India, Brazil and Japan.

Zhao, Yun.  The 2002 Space Cooperation Protocol Between China and Brazil:  An Excellent Example of South-South Cooperation.  Space Policy 21:213-219 August 2005.
China and Brazil have been cooperating in space since 1986 and, after 15 years of successful joint work, the two sides agreed on a 2002 Protocol, providing a more concrete framework for further cooperation.


Other Countries' Programs

General Information | Australia| Brazil| China| Europe| India| Iran| Japan| Korea, South| Russia


General Information

Books

Burleson, Daphne.  Space Programs Outside the United States:  All Exploration and Research Efforts, Country by Country.  Jefferson, NC, McFarland, 2005.  325 p.
Book call no.:  629.4025 B961s

Jane's Space Directory 2004-2005 .  Alexandria, VA, Jane's Information Group, 2004.  983 p.
Book call no.:  R 629.405 J331 (older editions, 1993+, are in bookstacks)

Australia

Books

Sims, Dominic.  Initiating a Coherent Approach to the Development of RAAF Space Doctrine.  Fairbairn, ACT, Royal Australian Air Force, Aerospace Centre, 2003.  28 p.
Also available online at: http://www.defence.gov.au/RAAF/AirPower/html/publications/papers/apdc/apdc_09_development_of_raafF_space_doctrine.pdf
Book call no.:  358.4030994 S614i

Sims, Dominic.  Putting Space Into RAAF Aerospace Doctrine.  Fairbairn, ACT , Royal Australian Air Force, Aerospace Centre, 2004.  30 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.defence.gov.au/RAAF/AirPower/html/publications/papers/apdc/apdc_16_putting_space_into_raaf_aerospace_power_doctrine.pdf
Book call no.:  358.4030994 S614p

Wallis, Scott and Fogg, David.  Space Operations:  An Australian Perspective.  Fairbairn, ACT , Royal Australian Air Force, Aerospace Centre, 2001.  59 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.defence.gov.au/RAAF/AirPower/html/publications/papers/apdc/apdc_01_space_operations.pdf
Book call no.:  358.80994 W214s

Periodicals

Kingwell, Jeff.  Punching Below Its Weight:  Still the Future of Space in Australia?  Space Policy 21:161-163 May 2005.

Brazil

Periodicals

Braun, Frank.  Reviving a Nation's Space Dreams.  Ad Astra 17:28-42 Winter 2005.
Looks at the efforts of Brazil to restart its space program after a catastrophic explosion of its Veiculo Lancador de Satelites rocket in August 2003, and the purpose of its space cooperation agreements with Russia and Ukraine.

Krug, Thelma.  Space Technology and Environmental Monitoring in Brazil.  Journal of International Affairs 51:655-674 Spring 1998.

Zaborsky, Victor.  Missile Proliferation Risks of International Space Cooperation.  World Affairs 165:185-196 Spring 2003.
Examines the co-relation of civilian and military space programs, as well as missile proliferation risks that accompany transfers of sensitive rocket technologies.  Zaborsky discusses the programs of four countries that have already achieved some success in building orbital launch vehicles:  China, India, Brazil and Japan.

Zhao, Yun.  The 2002 Space Cooperation Protocol Between China and Brazil:  An Excellent Example of South-South Cooperation.  Space Policy 21:213-219 August 2005.
China and Brazil have been cooperating in space since 1986 and, after 15 years of successful joint work, the two sides agreed on a 2002 Protocol, providing a more concrete framework for further cooperation.

China

Books

Ball, Desmond.  China's Signals Intelligence (SIGINT):  Satellite Programs.  Canberra, Australia , Australian National University. Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, 2003.  28 p. (Working paper; no. 382)
Book call no.:  355.3432 B187c

Harvey, Brian.  China's Space Program:  From Conception to Manned Spaceflight.  New York , Springer, 2004.  349 p.
Book call no.:  387.8 H341ca

Meteyer, David O.  The Art of Peace:  Dissuading China from Developing Counter-Space Weapons.  Colorado Springs, CO, USAF Academy, Institute for National Security Studies, August 2005. 
Also available online at:  http://www.usafa.af.mil/df/inss/OCP/ocp60.pdf
Book call no.:  358.80951 M591a

Mowthorpe, Matthew.  The Militarization and Weaponization of Space.  Lanham, MD, Lexington Books, 2004.  251 p.
Analyzes the military space policies of the United States, the Soviet Union/Russia, and the People's Republic of China from the Cold War period to the present day.
Book call no.:  358.8 M936m

Thompson, David J. and Morris, William R.  China in Space:  Civilian and Military Developments.  Maxwell Air Force Base, AL, Air University Press, 2001.  28 p. (Maxwell paper; 24)
Also available online at:  http://www.au.af.mil/au/aul/aupress/Maxwell_Papers/Text/mp24.pdf
Book call no.:  358.80951 T469c

Documents

Annual Report to Congress:  Military Power of the People's Republic of China 2006.  Washington, Dept. of Defense, 2006.  58 p.
Space and Counterspace Developments, pp 31-35.
Also available online at:  http://www.defenselink.mil/pubs/china.html
Doc. call no.:  355.033051 A615

Periodicals

Aldhous, Peter and Ananthaswamy, Anil.  Asia Blazes Trail to the Final Frontier.  New Scientist 188:8-9 October 22-28, 2005.
What separates China from other aspiring Asian space powers is its determined pursuit of human space flight.  Author describes China's space program.

Chinese Space.  Journal of the British Interplanetary Society (Supplement 2:  Space Chronicle) 57:entire issue, 2005.
Articles include:  China's Manned Space Programme--Excellent Value for Money; Early American Overflights of Jiuquan Launch Centre; China's New Chang Zheng-5 Launch Vehicle.

Ding Wenlei.  Commercialize Space Technologies.  Beijing Review 48:28-29 October 27, 2005.
During their recent five-day mission to orbit the Earth, Chinese astronauts spent 115 hours and 32 minutes in space and traveled 2 million miles, setting a new manned space flight record for China.

Gouveia, William Jr.  Assessment of Anti-Satellite Capabilities and their Strategic Limitations.  Astropolitics 3:163-184 Summer 2005.
Includes an analysis of China's ASAT program, pp 175-178.

Johnson-Freese, Joan.  China's Manned Space Program:  Sun Tzu or Apollo Redux?  Naval War College Review 56:51-71 Summer 2003.
Sun Tzu's adage of "bearing down on the enemy" seems to encapsulate the current approaches of both the United States and China to their space programs.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=379812781&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Johnson-Freese, Joan.  "Houston, We Have a Problem":  China and the Race to Space.  Current History 102:259-265 September 2003.
Some observers see China's race to space as a way to earn prestige and recapture its lost legacy of technological mastery and innovation.  Another possible reason is the Chinese may be drawing attention from their military space activities, which will clearly benefit from the dual-use nature of the technology being developed.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=412009081&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Johnson-Freese, Joan.  Space Wei Qi:  The Launch of Shenzhou V.  Naval War College Review 57:121-145 Spring 2004.
Argues that the US can continue to exclude China from cooperative space efforts, commerce a new manned-space-flight race, or initiate an incremental program of space cooperation including the Chinese.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=649155471&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Lele, Ajey.  China:  A Growing Military Space Power.  Astropolitics 3:67-75 Spring 2005.

Lewis, Jeffrey.  Engage China, Engage the World.  Ad Astra 17:26-27 Spring 2005.
Discusses several issues on the efforts of China to develop its space technology program.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17832780

Liao, Shu-Hsien.  Will China Become a Military Space Superpower?  Space Policy 21:205-212 August 2005.
China's ambitious space program was born in extremely poor national conditions in 1956. By 15 October 2003, with the successful return of the Shenzhou-4 manned space flight, it had developed dramatically. While this flight was a milestone in China's space capabilities, it should be considered not as an end, but as the entry ticket to the space power club of the USA and Russia.

Martel, William C. and Yoshihara, Toshi.  Averting a Sino-U.S. Space Race.  Washington Quarterly 26:19-36 Autumn 2003.

Murray, William S. III and Antonellis, Robert.  China's Space Program:  The Dragon Eyes the Moon (And Us).  Orbis 47:645-652 Fall 2003.

Sabathier, Vincent.  Europe and China.  Ad Astra 17:28-29 Spring 2005.
Discusses the potential partnership between Europe and China in space exploration.  Difference between the attitudes of the U.S. and European Union towards China; Implications of China's emerging space program for global security; Background on space programs launched by the EU.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17832781

Saunders, Phillip C.  China's Space Ambitions:  Implications for U.S. Security.  Ad Astra 17:21-23 Spring 2005.
Discusses the significance of the improvements in China's space capabilities to its Army, and details of antisatellite weapon research by Chinese scientists.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17832778

Westlake, Michael.  Sightseeing [Far] Beyond the Great Wall.  Aerospace America 43:8-9 July 2005.
Focuses on developments in the space programs of China and Japan.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17559440

Wortzel, Larry M.  The Rules of Engagement:  The Russia Model.  Ad Astra 17:24-25 Spring 2005.
China has embarked on an ambitious program to compete with the US in both the civil and military aspects of space exploration.  Concerns about China's military intentions have led many Americans to question whether the US should cooperate with China on civil space programs.

Yu, Shujun.  Space Station, Ultimate Goal.  Beijing Review 48:26-29 October 27, 2005.
After flying 2 million miles in 115 hours and 32 minutes in space, Shenzhou 6 brought China's second manned space mission to a close, making it only the third country to put a man in space after Russia and the US.

Zhao, Yun.  The 2002 Space Cooperation Protocol Between China and Brazil:  An Excellent Example of South-South Cooperation.  Space Policy 21:213-219 August 2005.
China and Brazil have been cooperating in space since 1986 and, after 15 years of successful joint work, the two sides agreed on a 2002 Protocol, providing a more concrete framework for further cooperation.

Europe

Books

Johnson, Stephen B.  The Secret of Apollo:  Systems Management in American and European Space Programs.  Baltimore, MD, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002.  290 p.
Book call no.:  629.40973 J69s

Silverstri, Stefano.  Space and Security Policy in Europe:  Executive Summary.  Paris, European Union Institute for Security Studies, 2003.  31 p. (Occasional papers; no. 48)
Also available online at:  http://www.iss-eu.org/occasion/occ48.pdf
Book call no.:  333.94094 S732

Periodicals

Beidleman, Scott W.  GPS vs Galileo:  Balancing for Position in Space.  Astropolitics 3:117-161 Summer 2005.
Investigates Europe's motives to develop the independent satellite navigation system known as Galileo, despite the existence of America's successful -- and freely available -- Global Positioning System.

Bignami, Giovanni.  A Fresh Start for Europe's Space Agency.  Nature 435:563-564 June 2, 2005.

Bochinger, Steve, Bullock, Matthew, and Mariez, Julien.  Solving Europe's Nuclear Dilemma.  Ad Astra 17:36-38 Summer 2005.
Focuses on issues surrounding the plan to develop a European nuclear space program. The European Space Agency must partner with several organizations to minimize technological risks associated with the program.

Brachet, Gerard and Deloffre Bernard.  Space for Defence:  A European Vision.  Space Policy 22:92-99 May 2006.

Hobe, Stephan.  Prospects for a European Space Administration.  Space Policy 20:25-29 February 2004.

Hogan, Jenny.  Europe's Cash Crisis Puts Space Plans under Threat.  Nature 438:542-543 December 1, 2005.

Ingold, Olivier.  Soyuz in French Guiana:  A Strategic Perspective.  Space Policy 22:140-148:  May 2006.
After a proposition from Russia to France, ESA agreed to see Soyuz rockets take off from French Guiana. From industry, to governments and agencies, many Russian and European actors were involved in this project and they all had different motives.

Kunzmann, Katharina and Reuter, Thomas.  Crafting a Legal Framework for a Coherent Future Structure for European Space Activities.  Space Policy 20:59-61 February 2004.

Madders, Kevin and Wouters, Jan.  Taking Stock of Europe's Developing Space Policy:  From the European Space Policy Workshops to the European Space Policy Forum.  Space Policy 20:31-36 February 2004.

Mowthorpe, Matthew.  Toward a European Space Force.  Journal of Social, Political and Economic Studies 30:3-7 Spring 2005.
Europe is reassessing its space assets requirements and has decided to acquire an independent navigation positioning system in the form of the Galileo project, as well as reconnaissance assets under the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) system.

Ryzenko, Jakub.  Involving the Central European Countries in the European Space Policy:  How Not to Miss the Opportunity?  Space Policy 20:237-239 November 2004.

Sabathier, Vincent.  Europe and China.  Ad Astra 17:28-29 Spring 2005.
Discusses the potential partnership between Europe and China in space exploration.  Difference between the attitudes of the U.S. and European Union towards China; Implication of China's emerging space program on global security; Background on space programs launched by the EU.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17832781

Verheugen, Gunter.  Europe's Space Plans and Opportunities for Cooperation.  Space Policy 21:93-95 May 2005.

Zak, Anatoly.  Europe to Join Russia in Building Next Space Shuttle.  IEEE Spectrum 42:12-14 August 2005.

India

Periodicals

Ananthaswamy, Anil.  Going It Alone.  New Scientist 185:33-35 February 19, 2005.
Author details India's self-sufficient space program, which has been successful against the odds.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=803087441&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Eyes in the Sky.  New Scientist 185:35 February 19, 2005.
Using imaging satellites for development remains at the top of Indian Space Research Organisation's agenda.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=803087131&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Mathews, Neelam.  Sorting Out.  Aviation Week & Space Technology 162:52-53 January 3, 2005.
Russia signed 10 agreements with India on space, defense, and aviation.  After talks with the European Union on investment in the Galileo GPS system, India formally agreed to participate in the Russian Glonass system. 
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=774590321&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Mathews, Neelam.  Space Stability.  Aviation Week & Space Technology 164:59 April 24, 2006.
The formation of an aerospace command for India has moved a step further, with the air force planning soon to present a military-space doctrine on its surveillance, reconnaissance and network-centric requirements.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1028023781&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Mathews, Neelam and others.  Easing Exports.  Aviation Week & Space Technology 164:26-27 March 13, 2006.
India's nascent commercial space-launch industry could get a boost under new bilateral agreements that should clear US export-control roadblocks for spacecraft and their components.  The State Dept. has cleared two US instruments to fly on the Chandrayaan-1 lunar orbiter next year, and India has agreed to share the data from its own instruments on the orbiter with US scientists.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1004244471&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Mistry, Dinshaw.  Looking East and West for Partners.  Ad Astra 17:30-44 Winter 2005.
Discusses India's space program.

Singh, Pulkit.  India Delays New Aerospace Command.  Journal of Electronic Defense 28:33-34 December 2005.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=947852091&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Zaborsky, Victor.  Missile Proliferation Risks of International Space Cooperation.  World Affairs 165:185-196 Spring 2003.
Examines the co-relation of civilian and military space programs, as well as missile proliferation risks that accompany transfers of sensitive rocket technologies.  To assess the missile proliferation risks of space cooperation, Zaborsky discusses the programs of four countries that have already achieved some success in building orbital launch vehicles:  China, India, Brazil and Japan.

Iran

Periodicals

Broad, William J. and Sanger David E.  Iran Joins the Space Club, But to What End?  New York Times April 4, 2006, page F1.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1014817381&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Covault, Craig.  Iran's "Sputnik".  Aviation Week & Space Technology 161:36-37 November 29, 2004.
Discusses the launch of an Iranian built satellite on an upgraded version of Iran's largest ballistic missile, the Shahab-3.

Iran's Space Program Poses Problems For Israel, U.S..  Defense Daily International 6:1+ December 16, 2005.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=944052161&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Japan

Periodicals

Cyranoski, David.  Satellite Loss Throws Japan's Space Programme into Disarray.  Nature 426:3 November 6, 2003.
Japan's space agency faced tough questions after the unexplained loss of Midori-II, one of the nation's most ambitious scientific satellites to date.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=500090801&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Day, Dwayne A.  Rising Sun in a Cloudy Sky.  Ad Astra 17:32-33 Winter 2005.
Looks at Japan's efforts to launch a manned spaceflight.

Fuyuno, Ichiko.  Japan Revises Its Military Plans for Space.  Nature 440:857 April 13, 2006.
Japan is considering the elimination of a self-imposed limit on the imaging resolution of military satellites, to enable them to detect missile launches.

Johnson-Freese, Joan and Gatling, Lance.  Security Implications of Japan's Information Gathering Satellite (IGS) System.  Intelligence & National Security 19:538-552 Autumn 2004.
Countries which previously limited their space activity to civilian purposes have increasingly come to employ dual-use technology as a first step into the world of military space.  Japan's Information Gathering Satellite (IGS) system, intended to support disaster relief situations, and provide information for diplomatic and defense policy decision-making, exemplifies this trend.

Reichhardt, Tony.  The Ambitious Hayabusa.  Air & Space Smithsonian 20:11 June-July 2005.

Sekigawa, Eiichiro.  Recce Recovery.  Aviation Week & Space Technology 162:38 February 7, 2005.
Japan devoted nearly one-third of its space spending in fiscal 2005 to developing military reconnaissance satellites, an allocation nearly as large as what the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency got for all of its space exploration, manned space and operational programs.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=791292731&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Suzuki, Kazuto.  Administrative Reforms and the Policy Logistics of Japanese Space Policy.  Space Policy 21:11-19 February 2005.

Westlake, Michael.  Sightseeing [Far] Beyond the Great Wall.  Aerospace America 43:8-9 July 2005.
Focuses on developments in the space programs of China and Japan.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17559440

Zaborsky, Victor.  Missile Proliferation Risks of International Space Cooperation.  World Affairs 165:185-196 Spring 2003.
Examines the co-relation of civilian and military space programs, as well as missile proliferation risks that accompany transfers of sensitive rocket technologies.  To assess the missile proliferation risks of space cooperation, Zaborsky discusses the programs of four countries that have already achieved some success in building orbital launch vehicles:  China, India, Brazil and Japan.

Korea, South

Periodicals

Doo Hwan Kim.  Korea's Space Development Programme:  Policy and Law.  Space Policy 22:110-117 May 2006.

Russia

Books

Mowthorpe, Matthew.  The Militarization and Weaponization of Space.  Lanham, MD, Lexington Books, 2004.  251 p.
Analyzes the military space policies of the United States, the Soviet Union/Russia, and the People's Republic of China from the Cold War period to the present day.
Book call no.:  358.8 M936m

Oberg, James E.  Star-Crossed Orbits:  Inside the U.S.-Russian Space Alliance.  New York , McGraw-Hill, 2002.  355 p.
Book call no.:  629.40973 O12s

Periodicals

Ingold, Olivier.  Soyuz in French Guiana:  A Strategic Perspective.  Space Policy 140-148:  May 2006.
After a proposition from Russia to France, ESA agreed to see Soyuz rockets take off from French Guiana. From industry, to governments and agencies, many Russian and European actors were involved in this project and they all had different motives.

Komarov, Alexey.  Stellar Plans.  Aviation Week & Space Technology 163:30 July 25, 2005.
The Russian government's new space spending plan marks the latest attempt to halt the decline of the country's industrial base.  The plan calls for the civil space program to receive about 305 billion rubles for space activities in 2006-2015.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=874030421&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Larson, George C.  Leroy's Launch.  Air & Space Smithsonian 20:40+ June-July 2005.
Reports on the launch of US astronaut Leroy Chiao with cosmonaut Salizhan Sharipov to bring Expedition 10 to the International Space Station on board Russia's Soyuz space vehicle in October 2004.

Mathews, Neelam.  Sorting Out.  Aviation Week & Space Technology 162:52-53 January 3, 2005.
Russia signed 10 agreements with India on space, defense, and aviation. After talks with the European Union on investment in the Galileo GPS system, India formally agreed to participate in the Russian Glonass system.  The two countries plan to build and launch satellites together, with Russia's 11 satellites to be increased to 18 by 2007.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=774590321&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Oberg, James.  Phoenix Rising or Lion in Winter?  Ad Astra 17:24-42 Winter 2005.
Observations on Russia's plans to launch a space mission, the program's budget, obstacles facing the country's space industry, and Russia's one-generation space workforce.

Russia's Military Space Program Facing Difficult Transition Period.  Defense Daily International 6:1 February 11, 2005.
Russia is hoping to increase its number of GPS satellites now in orbit from 11 to 18 by 2007.  Eventually Russia would like to have a full constellation of 24 GPS satellites

Snooping on Radars:  A History of Soviet/Russian Global Signals Intelligence Satellites.  Journal of the British Interplanetary Society (Supplement 2:  Space Chronicle) 57:97-133 2005.

Soviet/CIS Space.  Journal of the British Interplanetary Society (Supplement 1:  Space Chronicle) 57:entire issue 2005.
Articles include:  Analysis of Soviet Lunar Missions; RORSATS:  The Veiled Threat; and A History of Soviet/Russian Meteorological Satellites.

Zak, Anatoly.  Europe to Join Russia in Building Next Space Shuttle.  IEEE Spectrum 42:12-14 August 2005.


Satellites

General Information| Communications| Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance| Microsatellites| Missile Warning| Navigation| Weather|


General Information

Books

Bille, Matt and Lishock, Erika.  The First Space Race:  Launching the World's First Satellites.  College Station, Texas A&M University Press, 2004.  214 p. (Centennial of flight series ; no. 8)
Also available online at:  http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0412/2003026809.html
Book call no.:  629.46 B597f

Challenges to US Space Superiority.  Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, National Air and Space Intelligence Center, 2005.  24 p.
Includes chart:  "Five-Year Satellite Projections by Mission Type, 2005-2006", page 10.
Book call no.:  358.8 D437

Documents

Grondin, Janet W.  Transforming Satellite Maneuverability for the 21st Century.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2003.  45 leaves.
An operational constraint of today's battlefield is the limited ability to maneuver satellites to support the war fighter.  This paper reviews the technical, safety, and political considerations of employing nuclear space propulsion for maneuvering orbiting military satellites.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 G876t

Oldenburg, James A.  In Orbit Basing of an Anti-Satellite Mission.  Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, Air Force Institute of Technology, 2001.  1 v. (various pagings)
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39567-5 O44i

Ramos, Kim.  Solar Power Constellations:  Implications for the United States Air Force.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2000.  30 p.
As the world population increases, alternative methods to produce sustainable cost-effective energy are required.  The author presents several solar power satellite proposals, architectures, incremental technology demonstrations and predictions as to when they will become commercially viable.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA394928
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 R175s

Schwitters, Roy.  Space Infrastructure for 2020.  Arlington, VA, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, 2000.  40 p.
Summarizes JASON's 1999 study on new approaches to the infrastructure needed for building, launching, powering and servicing earth-orbiting satellites that could be applied to military missions.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA383890
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43830-2 no.99-125

Periodicals

Air Force Aims To Transform Space Acquisition Process.  Satellite News 29:1 February 1, 2006.
The service's revamped space acquisition processes will shift the risk of next-generation satellite programs from the production phase to the earlier developmental stages.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=995330771&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Caceres, Marco.  Cost Overruns Plague Military Satellite Programs.  Aerospace America 44:18-20+ January 2006.

Caceres, Marco.  Uptick in GEO Commercial Satellite Orders.  Aerospace America 44:20-22 May 2006.
217 commercial satellites were launched (or had attempted launches) worldwide during 1996-2005. Authors forecast that approximately 176 will be built and launched during 2006-2015.  A graph illustrates these statistics.

Hebert, Adam J.  High Anxiety.  Air Force Magazine 89:34-38 January 2006.
Satellites help the Air Force maintain its superiority over other military forces, and if they were destroyed by enemy forces the US military would lose its effectiveness.  The US must continue to develop and protect its assets in outer space and refine its ability to get the information collected from them to soldiers in the field.

Iannotta, Ben.  SUMO Wrestles Satellites into New Orbits.  Aerospace America 44:26-30 February 2006.
The Spacecraft for the Universal Modification of Orbits (SUMO) is a proposed unmanned orbital tow truck that would use robotic arms and mechanical hands to grab commercial or military satellites and move them to new orbits without damaging them.

Muir, Hazel.  Space Crimes and Misdemeanors.  New Scientist 186:8-9 April 23-29, 2005.
Defunct satellites in the geostationary ring above the Earth are left to orbit there forever.  Unless satellite operators clean up their act, newer spacecraft face the prospect of colliding with the orbiting junk.

Page, Joseph T.  Stealing Zeus' Thunder:  Physical Space-Control Advantages Against Hostile Satellites.  Air & Space Power Journal 20:19-25 Summer 2006.
Also available online at:  http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj06/sum06/page.html

Tomme, Edward B.  The Myth of the Tactical Satellite.  Air & Space Power Journal 20:89-100 Summer 2006.
Many proponents insist that “tactical” satellites are a must-have asset since they give the tactical war fighter a significant advantage in the battlespace.  But the author argues that developing, funding, and producing these satellites constitute misdirected attempts to convince field commanders that satellite capabilities exist for battlefield exploitation.  He suggests that these proponents need to shift their focus toward the strategic realm, where measurable satellite effects can be meaningfully realized. 
Also available online at:  http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj06/sum06/tomme.html

Communications

Books

Chartrand, Mark R.  Satellite Communications for the Nonspecialist.  Bellingham, WA, SPIE:  The International Society for Optical Engineering, 2004.  437 p.
Book call no.:  621.3825 C486s

Satellite Communications in the Early 21st Century:  Trends and Technologies, edited by Takashi Iida and others.  Reston, VA, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2003.  220 p.
Book call no.:  384.51 S253

Documents

Dahle-Melsaether, Bryan T.  In Pursuit of Fools Gold:  Theater Downlink at the Operational Level of War.  Newport, RI, Naval War College, Joint Military Operations Dept., 2003.  20 p.
Author argues that theater operations-theater downlink (TDL) is no longer required. Instead, the transmission of data over satellite relays from ISR sensors has proven itself over the skies of Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA415375
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41662 D1311i

Kirkman, Edric A.  Asymmetrical Threats and Homeland Security Policy:  Is America Ready for an Attack on Its Telecommunications Networks?  Carlisle Barracks, PA, Army War College, 2005. 28 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA431971
Doc call no.:  M-U 39080-537 K591a

Woods, William T.  Briefing on DoD's Report on Commercial Communications Satellite Services Procurement Process.  Washington, DC, Government Accountability Office, 2005.  24 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d051019r.pdf
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41026-173 no.05-1019R

Periodicals

Buenneke, Richard H.  Protection of Commercial Satellite Communications Infrastructure.  Astropolitics 2:237-259 Summer 2004.

Canan, James W.  Timing in Battle:  The T-Sat Edge.  Aerospace America 44:39-43 January 2006.
The transformational satellites communications system (T-Sat) promises revolutionary new speed and power for tomorrow's quick-strike, fast reaction warfare.

Erwin, Sandra I.  Multibillion-Dollar 'Internet in the Sky' Could Help Ease Bandwidth Crunch.  National Defense 89:24-25 June 2005.
Dubbed the Transformational Satellite Communications system, TSAT is regarded by DoD leaders and program advocates as a technological panacea that could help resolve the spectrum crunch by making the military services less dependent on radio communications.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=875056321&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Hewish, Mark.  Military Users Embrace Commercial Satcom Services.  Jane's International Defence Review 37:52-60 November 2004.

Lawlor, Maryann.  Satellite Modularity Soars to New Heights.  Signal 59:55-57 February 2005.
Discusses the launch of TacSat-1.

Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance

Books

Arnold, David Christopher.  Spying from Space:  Constructing America's Satellite Command and Control Systems.  College Station, TX, Texas A&M University Press, 2005.  209 p.
Book call no.:  358.8 A753s

Billingslea, Rachel E., Domsalla, Matthew, and Payne, Brian C.  The National Reconnaissance Office:  A Strategy for Addressing the Commercialization of Satellite Imagery.  Cambridge, MA, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, 1999.  55 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA366610
Book call no.:  621.3678 B598n

Keeley, James F. and Huebert, Robert N.  Commercial Satellite Imagery, and United Nations Peacekeeping:  A View From Above.  Burlington, VT, Ashgate, 2004.  251 p.
Book call no.:  327.12 C734

Temple, L. Parker III.  Shades of Gray:  National Security and the Evolution of Space Reconnaissance.  Reston, VA, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2005.  612 p.
Book call no.:  358.84 T286s

Documents

Babski, Ronald J.  "Hide Your Shape":  Sun Tzu ROE Considerations for Negating High-Resolution Commercial Imagery Satellites.  Newport, RI, Naval War College, 1999.  26 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA363236
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41662 B115h

Portouw, Lawrence J.  Implications of High-Resolution, Commercial Space Imagery for National Security and Homeland Defense.  Carlisle Barracks, PA , Army War College, 2002.  22 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA401674
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39080-537 P853i

Rider, Douglas B.  Establishing a Commercial Reserve Imagery Fleet:  Obtaining Surge Imagery Capacity from Commercial Remote Sensing Satellite Systems during Crisis.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2000.  51 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA394938
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 R544e

Streland, Arnold H.  Going Deep:  A System Concept for Detecting Deeply Buried Facilities from Space.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air War College, 2003.  64 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA424602
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43117 S9151g

Periodicals

Ailor, William.  Collision Avoidance and Improving Space Surveillance.  Astropolitics 2:107-120 Summer 2004.

Eves, Stuart.  Low Earth Orbit:  A Home for Small Satellite Constellations.  Journal of the British Interplanetary Society (Supplement 1:  Space Chronicle) 58:39-42 2005.

Singer, Jeremy.  Responsive Space.  Air Force Magazine 89:48-52 March 2006.
By 2010, Space Command hopes to be able to swiftly prepare and launch a small satellite that will survive only long enough to meet the intelligence-surveillance-reconnaissance (ISR) needs of the immediate mission.

Snooping on Radars:  A History of Soviet/Russian Global Signals Intelligence Satellites.  Journal of the British Interplanetary Society (Supplement 2:  Space Chronicle) 57:97-133 2005.

Williamson, Ray A. and Baker, John C.  Current US Remote Sensing Policies:  Opportunities and Challenges.  Space Policy 20:109-116 May 2004.
Reviews the evolution of policy on commercial imaging satellites from 1992 to the present and charts developments in the Landsat programme.

Microsatellites

Documents

Lawrence, Timothy J.  Building A Cadre of Space Professionals with Responsive Lift.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2003.  39 leaves.
Offers a conceptual design of a nanosatellite launcher and attempts to show that a low cost launch system could be developed.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 L423b

Periodicals

Digregorio, Barry E.  Roundabout Way of Profiling Earth's Atmosphere.  IEEE Spectrum 43:22-23 April 2006.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1018672901&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Scott, William B.  Fighters as Spacelift:  Can Tactical Aircraft Serve as a First Stage for Lofting Military Microsatellites into Orbit?  Aviation Week & Space Technology 158:72-74 April 7, 2003.
Discusses Air Force Research Laboratory plans for flight tests of a quick-response, microsatellite launch vehicle (MSLV), to determine the feasibility of air-launching a 3-stage booster from an F-15E fighter.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=323294611&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

USAF Pursues Orbital Rendezvous Effort.  Interavia Issue 682:39 Winter 2005.
The Air Force has used the Experimental Satellite System micro-satellite, commonly referred to as XSS-11, to investigate a variety of prospective space applications, including servicing, repair, and resupply.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=969143801&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Missile Warning

Documents

Defense Science Board Task Force on Contributions of Space Based Radar to Missile Defense.  Washington, DC, Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics, 2004.  22 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA428771
Doc. call no.:  M-U 40607-179

Trenary, Ralph Hiram.  The National Guard Ballistic Missile Defense Mission:  Minutemen at the Orbital Plane.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2004.  89 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA427281
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42525 T792n

Periodicals

Air Force Begins Search For SBIRS Alternative, Decision Planned By '08.  Defense Daily 229:1 January 10, 2006.
The Air Force has launched the first of several studies to identify a potential alternative to Lockheed Martin's [LMT] Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS) High missile early warning satellite.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=963774741&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Butler, Amy.  A Billion Here, A Billion There.  Aviation Week & Space Technology 162:22 March 21, 2005.
Originally expected to cost about $4 billion, the Space-Based Infrared System (SBIRS) High is now expected to total well beyond $10 billion.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=811936011&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Butler, Amy.  Space Tracking for MDA.  Aviation Week & Space Technology 163:51 October 3, 2005.
The US Missile Defense Agency (MDA) is beginning to outline its plans for a multi-billion-dollar space-based midcourse missile-tracking constellation.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=907385991&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Covault, Craig.  Eagle Eye on Threats.  Aviation Week & Space Technology 160:99-100 February 23, 2004.
Discusses the Air Force Defense Support Program's missile-warning spacecraft.

de Selding, Peter B.  SBIRS (Space-Based Infrared System) High has Been High-Tech Headache.  Defense News 20:14 May 9, 2005.

Hebert, Adam J.  SBIRS Has New Cost Overrun.  Air Force Magazine 88:24 May 2005.

Sirak, Michael.  US Restructures Troubled Satellite Programme.  Jane's Defence Weekly 42:8 December 21, 2005.
Reports that the Air Force has restructured its next-generation missile warning satellite program to mitiligate the impact of lingering technical complexities.

Navigation

Books

Lewis, Rosalind.  Building a Multinational Global Navigation Satellite System:  An Initial Look.  Santa Monica, CA , RAND, 2005.  103 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.rand.org/pubs/monographs/2005/RAND_MG284.pdf
Book call no.:  623.893 B932

Rip, Michael Russell and Hasik, James M.  The Precision Revolution:  GPS and the Future of Aerial Warfare.  Annapolis, MD, Naval Institute Press, 2002.  552 p.
Book call no.:  358.418 R588p

Documents

Hook, David E.  For Want of a Nail:  An Assessment of Global Positioning System Satellite Replenishment.  Fort Leavenworth, KS, School of Advanced Military Studies, Army Command and General Staff College, 2004.  92 p.
Investigates whether the Air Force should forgo its launch-to-sustain replenishment strategy in favor of a more aggressive launch-to-augment strategy, in order to proactively replace high-risk satellites and to accelerate modernization timelines.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA428995
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022-2 H781f

Periodicals

Beidleman, Scott W.  GPS vs Galileo:  Balancing for Position in Space.  Astropolitics 3:117-161 Summer 2005.
Investigates Europe's motives to develop the independent satellite navigation system known as Galileo, despite the existence of America's successful -- and freely available -- Global Positioning System.

Nitschke, Stefan.  Satellites for Naval Warfare:  Navigation, Surveillance, and Guidance for Weapon Systems.  Naval Forces 26:96-102 2005.
Author highlights the naval use of satellite technology and the importance of the GPS navigation for naval warfare.

Weather

Documents

Bjorkman, Christopher Sean.  Should Non Department of Defense Meteorological Satellites Be Used to Meet Department of Defense Environmental Requirements?  Fort Leavenworth, KS, Army Command and General Staff College, 2003.  60 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA416165
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022 B626s

Periodicals

Choi, Charles Q.  Polar Satellite Freeze.  Scientific American 294:18-20 February 2006.
The long-range weather forecasts that warned of where Hurricane Katrina would strike depended on data from polar satellites.  Now the replacements for the aging US military and civilian fleet are are in jeopardy.

Digregorio, Barry E.  Roundabout Way of Profiling Earth's Atmosphere.  IEEE Spectrum 43:22-23 April 2006.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1018672901&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Fiorino, Steven T.  Using Space-Based Radar to Derive Fully Integrated, Real-Time Weather Information.  Air & Space Power Journal 18:113-121 Summer 2004.
Generally, space-based radars used in weather and other military/civilian aviation operations have been designed and fielded separately.  This practice has prevented the integration of time-sensitive, mission-critical, radar-derived meteorological information with other key radar-derived data. Author argues that the collection of weather data from future SBR platforms would significantly benefit operational- and tactical-level war fighters.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=659674581&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Morring, Frank Jr.  Storm Warnings.  Aviation Week & Space Technology 164:81 March 20, 2006.
Beginning in 2007 or in early 2008, sunspots, solar flares and coronal mass ejections should increase 30-50% over the most recent solar cycle, with the potential for corresponding disruptions in space and terrestrial systems.  Those include both communications and navigation satellites, as well as power grids and ground-based communications networks.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1008500091&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Ross, Philip E.  Waiting and Waiting For the Next Killer Wave.  IEEE Spectrum 42:17 March 2005.
The Pacific warning system ties together two elements:  a surveillance network of seismic sensors, tide gauges, and satellites - and detailed maps of the ocean floor.  Together they enable scientists to predict how hard a given tsunami will hit a given target's shores.

Soviet/CIS Space.  Journal of the British Interplanetary Society (Supplement 1:  Space Chronicle) 57:entire issue 2005.
Articles include:  Analysis of Soviet Lunar Missions; RORSATS:  The Veiled Threat; and A History of Soviet/Russian Meteorological Satellites.


Separate Space Force


Books

Whittington, Michael C.  A Separate Space Force:  An 80-Year-Old Argument.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air War College, 2000. 19 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA378853
Book call no.:  358.4130973 W626s

Documents

Barber, Norman W. and others.  Why Space Should be a Separate Service.  Norfolk, VA, Joint Forces Staff College, 2002. 17 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA421657
Doc. call no.:  M-U 36185-36 B234w

Gibson, Robert D.  Space Power:  The Revolution in Military Affairs.  Carlisle Barracks, PA , Army War College , 2001.  19 p.
Argues that three things must occur for the US to maintain its position as the world's preeminent space power:  the idea of weapons in space should be recognized as inevitable; space should be recognized as a distinct and legitimate Area of Responsibility in the Unified Command Plan; and the Defense Department should create a separate Space Corps under the auspices of the Air Force.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA390639
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39080-537 G449s

Marheine, Fred H.  Do We Need Separate Space Theory:  The Lessons of History.  Maxwell AFB, AL, School of Advanced Airpower Studies, 2001.  90 p.
Attempts to resolve the fundamental question:  are the physical characteristics of the space environment sufficiently different to require an independent body of theory to guide operators in seizing its full exploitation potential?
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA407814
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43998-1 M331d

Robinson, Alec M.  Distinguishing Space Power From Air Power:  Implications for the Space Force Debate.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 1998.  55 p.
General Charles Horner, former commander of U.S. Space Command, advocates the creation of an independent Space Force, separate from the Air Force.  Justifications for such a change depend in large measure on whether space power can provide a way of fighting and winning wars distinct from that provided by the other services.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA399130
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 R658d

Story, Kurt S.  A Separate Space Force:  An Old Debate With Renewed Relevance.  Carlisle Barracks, PA , U.S. Army War College, 2002.  34 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA404193
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39080-607 S887s

Swegel, Jeffrey R.  A Fork in the Path to the Heavens:  The Emergence of an Independent Space Force.  Fort Leavenworth, KS, School of Advanced Military Studies, Army Command and General Staff College, 2002.  59 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA403851
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022-2 S9741f

Periodicals

Harter, Mark E.  Ten Propositions Regarding Space Power:  The Dawn of a Space Force.  Air & Space Power Journal 20:64-78 Summer 2006.
LtCol Harter advocates a separate and distinct space force, replete with its own doctrine, leadership, organization, and resources.
Also available online at:  http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj06/sum06/harter.html

Moorehead, Richard D.  Will We Need a Space Force?  Military Review 84:50-53 July-August 2004.
In its January 2001 report, the Commission to Assess US National Security Space Management and Organization concluded that the disadvantages of creating a separate Space Force outweighed the advantages.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=682608301&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD


Space Control & Counterspace


Books

Johnson-Freese, Joan.  The Viability of U.S. Anti-Satellite (ASAT) Policy:  Moving Toward Space Control .  Colorado Springs, CO, Institute for National Security Studies, U.S. Air Force Academy, 2000.  36 p. (INSS occasional paper. Space policy series; 30)
Also available online at:  http://www.usafa.af.mil/df/inss/OCP/ocp30.pdf
Book call no.:  358.80973 J66v

Meteyer, David O.  The Art of Peace:  Dissuading China from Developing Counter-Space Weapons.  Colorado Springs, CO, USAF Academy, Institute for National Security Studies, August 2005. 
Also available online at:  http://www.usafa.af.mil/df/inss/OCP/ocp60.pdf
Book call no.:  358.80951 M591a

Pike, John E.  American Control of Outer Space in the Third Millennium.  Washington, DC, Federation of American Scientists, 1998. 
Also available online at:  http://www.fas.org/spp/eprint/space9811.htm
Book call no.:  358.80973 P636a

Spacy, William L.  Does the United States Need Space-Based Weapons?  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air University Press, 1999.  120 p. (CADRE paper; 3)
Includes:  Defending space-based assets; technological factors bearing on space-based weapons; ground-based alternatives for space control; defensive counterspace; offensive counterspace; nondestructive approaches to offensive counterspace; destructive approaches to offensive counterspace.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA391888
Book call no.:  358.88 S732d

Documents

Axup, Peter.  Space Control for the Theater Commander:  Naval Blockade as a Precedent.  Newport, RI, Naval War College, 1999.  23 p.
Author argues that the idea of naval blockades can be extended into space operations.  They provide precedent for both the concepts to employ in space warfare, and for the incremental approach to establish international law favorable to such operations.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA370673
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41662 A972s

Billman, Gregory M.  The "Space" of Aerospace Power:  Why and How.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air University, Air Force Fellows Program, May 2000.  239 p.
This paper addresses the "why?" and "how?" questions facing the Air Force vis-a-vis realizing full spacepower capabilities, not only improved force enhancement and space force support, but more importantly, space control and space force application.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA394062
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42252-91 B5981s

Crosier, Clinton E.  Space Power and Homeland Security:  Is NORTHCOM Leveraging Every Tool in the Arsenal?  Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2004.  23 p.
Integrating space assets into operations is a powerful capability that has not been fully leveraged, primarily due to NORTHCOM/DHS's lack of understanding of space capabilities and how to exploit them.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA425996
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41662 C949s

Crosier, Clinton E.  U.S. Space Power:  The Achilles Heel of America's Economic Well-Being.  Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2004.  24 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA427676
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41662-105 C949u

Davis, Stephen L.  The Space Maneuver Vehicle:  Enhancing Space's Utility to the Warfighter.  Quantico, VA, Marine Corps Command and Staff College, 2002.  44 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA404007
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41886-71 D264s

Douglas, Michael L. and Gray, Arlene J.  The Warfighter's Counterspace Threat Analysis (WCTA):  A Framework for Evaluating Counterspace Threats.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2000.  82 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA384609
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42525 D735w

Fernandez, Adolfo J.  Military Space Control:  An Intuitive Analysis.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air University, 2004.  57 p.
Analyzes major aspects of military space control strategy to determine whether U.S. initiatives are on track to meet the needs of the warfighter.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA434364
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42252-91 F363m

Fox, Scott M.  Relationships Between Space and Information Operations:  A Focus on the Effects.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2001.  36 p.
During Operation Allied Force, space capabilities supported not only precision engagement and global attack requirements but also information superiority.  Air Force Space Command identified a doctrinal overlap between the space and information superiority missions that resulted in confusion concerning roles, responsibilities, and unit organization.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 F794r

Fredriksson, Brian E.  Fires From Heaven:  The Application of Force Through Space.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2002.  43 p.
Proposes that weapons systems that transit through space offer the advantages of global reach, unprecedented response times, and minimal forward footprint, without the provocative nature and inherent vulnerabilities of space based systems.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 F852f

Jackson, Christopher J.  Laying the Space Control Foundation:  Integrated Space Situational Awareness.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2003.  35 leaves.
As the US military continues to increase its reliance on space capabilities, potential adversaries may see this as an opportunity for asymmetric attack to cripple terrestrial military forces.  This paper examines the military's increasing reliance on space assets and the vulnerability this creates.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 J123L

Jameson, Austin D.  X-37 Space Vehicle:  Starting a New Age in Space Control?  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2001.  36 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA407255
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 J31x

Kinnan, Christopher J.  Space-Derived Transparency:  Players, Policies, Implications, and Synergies.  Maxwell AFB, AL, School of Advanced Airpower Studies, 2001.  129 p.
Democratization and globalization, the proliferation of information technologies, the availability of commercial space high-resolution imagery, and the growing influence of NGOs invite this question:  what is (space-derived) transparency and what effect does it have on US security policy?
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA407812
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43998-1 K55s

Kuo, Didi.  The High Ground for Homeland Security:  The Use of Space in the Fight Against Terrorism in America.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2002.  104 p.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 K966h

Netherland, Scott F.  U.S. Policy on Weaponizing Space and the Army's Role in Space Control Operations.  Carlisle Barracks, PA, Army War College, 2004.  18 p.
Reviews Joint and Army Doctrine on the Command and Control of Space Forces, and concludes with recommendations for a clarification of U.S. space policy actions.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA424220
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39080-537 N469u

Newberry, Robert D.  Spacepower as a Coercive Force.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air War College, [2003].  44 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA424819
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43117 N5342s

Patenaude, Richard M.  How to Institutionalize Space Superiority in the United States Air Force.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air War College, 2001.  20 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA420527
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43117 P295h

Perdomo, Maurice C.  United States National Space Security Policy and the Strategic Issues for DoD Space Control.  Carlisle Barracks, PA, Army War College, 2005.  24 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA431824
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39080-537 P433u

Petras, Christopher M.  The Convergence of U.S. Military and Commercial Space Activities:  Self-Defense and Cyber-Attack, "Peaceful Use" and the Space Station, and the Need for Legal Reform.   Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, Air Force Institute of Technology, 2001.  130 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA401756
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39567-5 P943c

Raymond, John W.  Offensive Counterspace:  An Operational Fire.  Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2003.  22 p
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA420477
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41662 R2691o

Shumate, James R.  Information Weaponization of Space.  Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2001. 16 p.
Discusses offensive counterspace operations and specifically how information weaponization of space will allow the operational planner to obtain information superiority in the battlespace.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA393531
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41662 S5621i

Summers, Thomas A.  How Is U. S. Space Power Jeopardized by an Adversary's Exploitation, Technological Developments, Employment and Engagement of Laser Antisatellite Weapons?  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2000.  53 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA425117
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 S9553h

Thompson, David D.  The Need for a Dedicated Space Vehicle for Defensive Counterspace Operations.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 1998.  48 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA398851
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 T4691n

Welp, Randall J.  Prospects for Continuing U.S. Superiority in Space:  A Scenario-Based Assessment.  Fort Leavenworth, KS, Army Command and General Staff College, 2001.  192 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA395452
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022 W457p

Wingfield, George D.  Space Control:  Is Army Investment Necessary?  Fort Leavenworth, KS, School of Advanced Military Studies, Army Command and General Staff College, 2004.  62 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA430501
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022-2 W771s

Yowell, Michael L.  Will Current Policies and Capabilities Allow the United States to Control Space?  Carlisle Barracks, PA, Army War College, 2005.  22 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA432154
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39080-537 Y83w

Periodicals

Baines, Philip J.  Non-Offensive Defences:  Space Protection without Space-Based Weapons.  Astropolitics 2:149-174 Summer 2004.
Argues that developments designed to protect space systems from negation by other actors can increase their survivability without the need for space-based weapons riding shotgun or providing armed escort for the satellites of these systems.

Bille, Matt.  Everything Old Is New Again.  Ad Astra 17:24-46 Fall 2005.
Under the Outer Space Treaty of 1967, the principles of access to the use of space, non-ownership of celestial bodies and the illegality of stationing weapons of mass destruction in space were codified. Among the concepts not prohibited by the OST are space control and space-based missile defense.

Canan, James W.  Controlling the Space Arena.  Aerospace America 42:28-34 January 2004.
The USAF has set out to sharpen and broaden its situational awareness in space, and to make itself far more capable of protecting and defending US satellites.

Flavell, Paula B.  New USAF Doctrine Publication:  AFDD 2-2.1, Counterspace Operations.  Air & Space Power Journal 18:100-101 Winter 2004.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1014817381&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Hallman, Wesley.  A Fast-Following Space Control Strategy.  Astropolitics 3:35-42 Spring 2005.
Can the US afford being second to weaponize space? The author argues that it can, and should be.

Hamel, Michael.  Building Space Power for the Nation:  Air Force Achievements, Challenges, and Opportunities.  Air & Space Power Journal 20:55-63 Summer 2006.
General Hamel proposes new ways in which the United States can optimize its space assets for the future.
Also available online at:  http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj06/sum06/hamel.html

Harter, Mark E.  Ten Propositions Regarding Space Power:  The Dawn of a Space Force.  Air & Space Power Journal 20:64-78 Summer 2006.
Also available online at:  http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj06/sum06/harter.html

Kitfield, James.  Weapons in the High Heavens?  National Journal 37:2850-2852 September 17, 2005.
The second leg in Space Command's strategy is what it calls "defensive counterspace measures" -- essentially steps the military can take to better protect U.S. space assets.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1029217341&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Lewis, Jeffrey.  Space Control Isn't Freedom of Action.  Ad Astra 17:28-29 Fall 2005.
Focuses on the outer space control policy of the U.S. government. The objective of the space control mission is to ensure freedom of action in space for allied forces.  Among the factors that may influence satellite orbital crowding are the number of space launches and procedures to mitigate debris creation.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=19743037

Page, Joseph T.  Stealing Zeus' Thunder:  Physical Space-Control Advantages Against Hostile Satellites.  Air & Space Power Journal 20:19-25 Summer 2006.
Also available online at:  http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj06/sum06/page.html

Ziarnick, Brent D.  The Space Campaign:  Space-Power Theory Applied to Counterspace Operations.  Air & Space Power Journal 18:61-70 Summer 2004.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1005067831&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD


Space Debris


Internet Resources

Toner, Mike.  Final Frontier Littered with Junk:  Spacecraft End Up as Debris that Must be Charted Lest it Imperil New Voyagers, and When the Shards Fall to Earth, Look Out Below.  Atlanta Journal-Constitution February 26, 2006, page A1.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=993616531&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Books

Campbell, Jonathan W.  Using Lasers in Space:  Laser Orbital Debris Removal and Asteroid Deflection.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Center for Strategy and Technology, Air War College, Air University, 2000.  27 p.
Book call no.:  629.416 C188

Documents

Williamsen, Joel.  Review of Space Shuttle Meteoroid/Orbital Debris Critical Risk Assessment Practices.  Alexandria, VA , Institute for Defense Analyses, 2003.  1 v. (various pagings)
Doc. call no.:  M-U 40381-11 no.3838

Periodicals

Brearley, Andrew.  Faster Than a Speeding Bullet:  Orbital Debris.  Astropolitics 3:1-34 Spring 2005.

David, James.  Was It Really 'Space Junk'? US Intelligence Interest in Space Debris that Returned to Earth.  Astropolitics 3:43-65 Spring 2005.
One part of the massive US intelligence effort to learn about Soviet missile and space programs during the Cold War was acquiring and analyzing Soviet space debris.

Goldfarb, Greg.  Orbiting Politics.  Harvard International Review 19:58-61 Summer 1997.
Discusses the problems posed by debris left by space missions for satellites orbiting the earth.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=9710211018

Liou, J. C. and Johnson, N. L.  Risks in Space from Orbiting Debris.  Science 311:340-341 January 20, 2006.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=976886491&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

McKee, Maggie.  Flying Blankets Threaten Satellites.  New Scientist 183:14 August 14-20, 2004.
There are faint, mysterious objects orbiting high above the Earth that NASA believes could be gossamer-thin sheets of insulation torn from satellites.  Their relatively high speed could make them a danger to working satellites.

Mirmina, Steven A.  Reducing the Proliferation of Orbital Debris:  Alternatives to a Legally Binding Instrument.   American Journal of International Law 99:649-662 July 2005.
Describes the scope of the threat posed by orbital debris and advises immediate action to mitigate that threat.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=929164471&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Muir, Hazel.  Space Crimes and Misdemeanors.  New Scientist 186:8-9 April 23-April 29, 2005.
Defunct satellites in the geostationary ring above the Earth are left to orbit there forever.  Unless satellite operators clean up their act, newer spacecraft face the prospect of colliding with the orbiting junk.

Oberg, James E.  The Things that Fell to Earth:  Now NASA Can Predict When Space Junk Will Fall in Your Back Yard.  Air & Space Smithsonian 19:50-56 December 2004-January 2005.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=757199531&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Perek, Lubos.  Space Debris Mitigation and Prevention:  How to Build a Stronger International Regime.  Astropolitics 2:215-226 Summer 2004.


Space Exploration


Books

Bleeker, J. A. M. and others.  The Century of Space Science.  London, Dordrecht, 2001.  2 v.
The first volume begins with an extensive history of space science before and during the early part of the 20th century, followed by articles detailing the fundamental science investigated in space.  The second volume details the exploration and study of the solar system and, particularly, Earth from space.
Book call no.:  500.5 C397

Butrica, Andrew J.  Single Stage to Orbit:  Politics, Space Technology, and the Quest for Reusable Rocketry.  Baltimore, MD, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003.  266 p.
Book call no.:  629.4410973 B987s

Reichhardt, Tony.  Space Shuttle:  The First 20 Years.  New York , DK Pub., 2002.  320 p.
Book call no.:  629.441 S7323

Return to the Moon, edited by Rick N. Tumlinson, with Erin R. Medlicott.  Burlington, Ontario, Canada, Apogee Books, 2005.  208 p.
Book call no.:  629.454 R439

Space Policy in the Twenty-First Century, edited by W. Henry Lambright.  Baltimore, MD, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003.  283 p.
Reminding readers of historical highlights, the authors pose questions about the priorities and applications of space science, manned vs. unmanned flights, and commercial access to the space enterprise.
Book call no.:  629.40973 S7321

Zaehringer, Alfred J. and Whitfield, Steve.  Rocket Science:  Rocket Science in the New Millennium.  Burlington, Ontario, Apogee Books, 2004.  215 p.
Chapters discuss history, energetics, economics, government and industry, international aspects, humans in space, and the future.
Book call no.:  621.4356 Z17r

Periodicals

Baker, Adam M.  Low Cost Deep Space Missions, or "Do You Really Need Astronauts to Explore the Solar System?"  Journal of the British Interplanetary Society (Supplement 1:  Space Chronicle) 58:43-54 2005.

Binnie, Brian.  Confessions of a Spaceship Pilot.  Air & Space Smithsonian 20:28+ June-July 2005.
Describes t the author's experience in piloting the SpaceShipOne, which won the $10 million Ansari X-Prize on October 4, 2004.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17512665

Blamont, Jacques.  International Space Exploration:  Cooperative or Competitive?  Space Policy 21:89-92 May 2005.

Caceres, Marco.  Creating a Space Exploration Industry.  Aerospace America 43:10-12 August 2005.

Calvert, Ken.  Exploration Needs Commercial Space Transportation.  Aviation Week & Space Technology 162:66 February 21, 2005.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=798817361&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Hancock, Thomas M.  A Building-Block Approach to Space.  Aerospace America 43:33+ May 2005.
Discusses some of the ways NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle will change the space program of the United States.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=16964510

Iannotta, Ben.  DART Aims at Space Rendezvous.  Aerospace America 43:26-30 March 2005.
Discusses NASA's Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technologies experiment, which will test the sensors, propulsion systems and software needed by U.S. spacecraft for conducting maneuvers in close proximity to other spacecraft, without help from human controllers or astronauts.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=16469777

Launius, Roger D.  After Columbia:  The Space Shuttle Program and the Crisis in Space Access.  Astropolitics 2:277-322 Autumn 2004.

Maryniak, Gregg.  Will We See a Golden Age of Spaceflight?  Space Policy 21:111-119 May 2005.

Morring, Frank Jr.  Moon-Bound, Again.  Aviation Week & Space Technology 163:22-24 September 26, 2005.
Continued strong US leadership in human spaceflight is the stated goal of NASA's tightly focused new plan for lunar exploration.  The plan also includes seed money for a complete new commercial space industry.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=904067941&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Neal, Valerie.  Space Policy and the Size of the Space Shuttle Fleet.  Space Policy 20:157-169 August 2004.

Sarkissian, John M.  Return to the Moon:  A Sustainable Strategy.  Space Policy 22:118-127 May 2006.
Explores how the President's space initiative can be realized on an international co-operative basis along similar lines to those already existing with the international space station.

Sietzen, Frank Jr.  From Mercury to CEV:  Space Capsules Reemerge.  Aerospace America 43:26-30+ February 2005.
The space capsule, eclipsed for decades by the more complex and costly shuttle, now appears likely to reemerge as its successor.

Sietzen Jr., Frank.  Mapping the Moon's Resources.  Aerospace America 43:28-32 April 2005.
Discusses the purpose of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, a spacecraft tasked to perform a year-long resource allocation mission mapping of the lunar surface from orbit.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=16784461

Wilson, J. R.  Parsing the NASA Budget.  Aerospace America 44:28-33 April 2006.

Wilson, J. R.  The Wright Path to a Mars Flyer.  Aerospace America 44:40-44 April 2006.
In creating an unmanned aircraft that can fly in the Martian atmosphere, designers will return to some basic principles applied by the Wright brothers, but face challenges unlike any encountered on earth.

Yu Shujun.  Space Station, Ultimate Goal.  Beijing Review 48:26-29 October 27, 2005.
After flying 2 million miles in 115 hours and 32 minutes in space, Shenzhou 6 brought China's second manned space mission to a close, making it only the third country to put a man in space after Russia and the US.

Zak, Anatoly.  Europe to Join Russia in Building Next Space Shuttle.  IEEE Spectrum 42:12-14 August 2005.


Space Law, Policy and Doctrine


Books

Air Force Operations and the Law:  A Guide for Air and Space Forces.  Washington, International and Operations Law Division, Judge Advocate General's Department, U.S. Air Force, 2002.  700 p.
Book call no.:  342.0412 A298

Butterworth, Robert Lyle.  Growing the Space Industrial Base:  Policy Pitfalls and Prospects.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air University Press, 2000.  29 p. (Maxwell paper; 23)
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA383943 or

http://www.au.af.mil/au/aul/aupress/Maxwell_Papers/Tex t/mp23.pdf
Book call no.:  338.0919 B988g

Dolman, Everett C.  Astropolitik:  Classical Geopolitics in the Space Age.  London , Frank Cass, 2002.  208 p.
Identifies and evaluates the relationship between outer-space geography and geographic position (astrogeography), and the evolution of current and future military space strategy.
Book call no.:  327.0919 D665a

Goldman, Nathan C.  Space Policy:  An Introduction.  Ames, Iowa State University Press, 1992.  321 p.
Describes the broad sweep of decision making and outcomes of the American effort in space, and examines the political and technological complexities surrounding the history and development of space policy.
Book call no.:  333.94 G619s

Hayden, Dale L.  The International Development of Space and Its Impact on U.S. National Space Policy.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Airpower Research Institute, College of Aerospace Doctrine, Research and Education, Air University, 2004.  42 p.
Also available online at:  https://research.au.af.mil/papers/ay2004/ari/ARI2004-01.pdf
Book call no.:  358.8 H414i

Hoverstein, Michael R.  The Law Governing Aerospace Warfare in the Twenty-First Century.  Montreal, Quebec, Institute of Air and Space Law, McGill University, 2000.  136 p.
Space Law and Related Treaties, pp 24-28; Chapter 5:  Role and Effect of Space-Based Assets, pp 90-109.
Book call no.:  341.6 H845L

Johnson, Dana J., Hilgenberg, Gregory H., and Sarsfield, Liam.  Policy Issues and Challenges for Interagency Space Systems Acquisition.  Santa Monica, CA , National Security Research Division, Rand, 2001.  122 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.rand.org/publications/MR/MR1372/
Book call no.:  387.80973 J66p

Johnson-Freese, Joan.  The Viability of U.S. Anti-Satellite (ASAT) Policy:  Moving Toward Space Control.  Colorado Springs, CO, Institute for National Security Studies, U.S. Air Force Academy, 2000.  36 p. (INSS occasional paper. Space policy series; 30)
Also available online at:  http://www.usafa.af.mil/df/inss/OCP/ocp30.pdf
Book call no.:  358.80973 J66v

Lambakis, Steven James.  On the Edge of Earth:  The Future of American Space Power.  Lexington, KY, University Press of Kentucky, 2001.  365 p.
Book call no.:  387.80973 L219o

Mowthorpe, Matthew.  The Militarization and Weaponization of Space.  Lanham, MD, Lexington Books, 2004.  251 p.
Analyzes the military space policies of the United States, the Soviet Union/Russia, and the People's Republic of China from the Cold War period to the present day.
Book call no.:  358.8 M936m

Ramey, Robert A.  Space Warfare and the Future Law of War.  Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, Air Force Institute of Technology, 1999.  197 p.
Book call no.:  358.8 R172s

Smith, M. V.  Ten Propositions Regarding Spacepower.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air University Press, 2002.  140 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA407810
Book call no.:  358.80973 S655t

Terrill, Delbert R.  The Air Force Role in Developing International Outer Space Law.  Maxwell AFB, AL , Air University Press, 1999.  126 p.
Also available online at:  http://aupress.au.af.mil/Books/Terrill/terrill.pdf
Book call no.:  341.75679 T326a

Weeks, E. E.  Outsiders' Guide to Understanding Outer Space Development.  [Philadelphia, PA], Xlibris, 2004.  189 p.
Book call no.:  341.47 W395

Documents

Babski, Ronald J.  "Hide Your Shape":  Sun Tzu ROE Considerations for Negating High-Resolution Commercial Imagery Satellites.  Newport, RI, Naval War College, 1999.  26 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA363236
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41662 B115h

Butler, Richard J.  Sovereignty and Protective Zones in Space and the Appropriate Command and Control of Assets.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2001. 156 p.
Compares international law treaties and other historical analyses to current United States war fighting doctrine on space and proposes a US Air Force position on this issue.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA407102
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 B985s

Cooney, William T.  Protecting Critical Space Systems:  A National Security Issue.  Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2002.  (unpaged)
Examines such questions as:  what is the 'real' impact of commercial space on the U.S. economy and military capability?  How would loss of commercial space capabilities impact U.S. war fighting capability? What constitutes an attack on a commercial space system?  How do we detect and deter an attack?
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA405817
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41662 C7752p

DeReus, Darrin L.  Comparative Analysis on the Cost of Oversight for the New National Security Space Acquisition Policy.  Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, Air Force Institute of Technology, 2004.  99 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA422619
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39567-5 D363c

Fox, Scott M.  Relationships Between Space and Information Operations:  A Focus on the Effects.   Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2001.  36 p.
During Operation Allied Force, space capabilities supported not only precision engagement and global attack requirements but also information superiority.  Air Force Space Command identified a doctrinal overlap between the space and information superiority missions that resulted in confusion concerning roles, responsibilities, and unit organization.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 F794r

Gibson, Robert D.  Space Power:  The Revolution in Military Affairs.  Carlisle Barracks, PA , Army War College , 2001.  19 p.
Argues that three things must occur for the US to maintain its position as the world's preeminent space power:  the idea of weapons in space should be recognized as inevitable; secondly, space should be recognized as a distinct and legitimate Area of Responsibility in the Unified Command Plan; and lastly, the Defense Department should create a separate Space Corps under the auspices of the Air Force.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA390639
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39080-537 G449s

Marheine, Fred H.  Do We Need Separate Space Theory:  The Lessons of History.  Maxwell AFB, AL, School of Advanced Airpower Studies, 2001.  90 p.
Attempts to resolve the fundamental question:  are the physical characteristics of the space environment sufficiently different to require an independent body of theory to guide operators in seizing its full exploitation potential?
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA407814
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43998-1 M331d

Miller, Dennis M.  Commercialization of Space Systems:  Policy Implications for the United States.  Newport, RI, Naval War College, Center for Naval Warfare Studies, 2001.  103 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA393920
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41662-6 M6471c

Moran, Michael J.  An Evolving Doctrine:  Force Application From Space.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2000.  48 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA393968
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 M8291e

Netherland, Scott F.  U.S. Policy on Weaponizing Space and the Army's Role in Space Control Operations.  Carlisle Barracks, PA, Army War College, 2004.  18 p.
Reviews Joint and Army Doctrine on the Command and Control of Space Forces, and concludes with recommendations for a clarification of U.S. space policy actions.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA424220
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39080-537 N469u

Ovios, Matthew D.  Rules of Engagement for Space:  Where Do You Start?  Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2003.  [25] p.
Author maintains that, due to the similarities between space and the sea, maritime ROE is a natural framework upon which to develop ROE for a future conflict in space.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA415585
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41662 O961r

Perdomo, Maurice C.  United States National Space Security Policy and the Strategic Issues for DoD Space Control.  Carlisle Barracks, PA, Army War College, 2005.  24 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA431824
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39080-537 P433u

Petras, Christopher M.  The Convergence of U.S. Military and Commercial Space Activities:  Self-Defense and Cyber-Attack, "Peaceful Use" and the Space Station, and the Need for Legal Reform.  Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, Air Force Institute of Technology, 2001.  130 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA401756
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39567-5 P943c

Rivera, Tamaira.  Redefining Military Activities in Space:  A Viable Compromise Over the Military Uses of Space.  Washington, George Washington University, 2004.  82 p.
Argues that, in light of contemplated military uses of space, the Outer Space Treaty needs revision in order to strengthen its authority.  As it stands, the current legal regime of space has legal loopholes that allow for future military uses that are problematic under the current space treaties.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA426438
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43567-1005

Russo, Anthony J.  The 65-Mile Seam.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air War College, 2002.  36 p.
Written almost entirely by space operations experts, a new version of Space Operations Doctrine (AFDD 2-2) opens the door for consideration of the potentially unique contributions from operations in space. However, this otherwise forward-thinking document still begins Chapter One with the assertion "There is no division... between air and space.  Air and space are an indivisible field of operations."
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA420645
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43117 R9691s

Waldrop, Elizabeth Seebode.  Integration of Military and Civilian Space Assets:  Legal and National Security Implications.  Montreal, Quebec, McGill University, 2003.  113 p.
The first chapter explores the depth of the interdependence of military and civilian users on the same space systems.  The second considers the implications of dual use space technologies, such as proliferation concerns.  The third discusses various legal mechanisms States employ to address security issues involving space activities.  The final chapter outlines legal restrictions on the use of space assets by armed forces.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA416905
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43567-983

Wold, Philip T.  Operational Implications of Sovereignty and Freedom of Navigation in Space.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2001.  45 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA407148
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 W8521o

Periodicals

Bille, Matt.  Everything Old Is New Again.  Ad Astra 17:24-46 Fall 2005.
Under the Outer Space Treaty of 1967, the principles of access to the use of space, non-ownership of celestial bodies and the illegality of stationing weapons of mass destruction in space were codified. Among the concepts not prohibited by the OST are space control and space-based missile defense.

Dietrich, George B. and Goldstein, William C.  Collective Trusteeship for Near Space:  The Case for UNNESA.  Space Policy 14:9-14 February 1998.
Examines the need to determine what source of legal authority will govern commercial activities in space development activity.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=887833

Gabrynowicz, Joanne.  The International Space Treaty Regime in the Globalization Era.  Ad Astra 17:30-31 Fall 2005.

Goh, Gerardine Meishan.  Keeping the Peace in Outer Space:  A Legal Framework for the Prohibition of the Use of Force.  Space Policy 20:259-278 November 2004.

Hancock, Randy.  Provisions of the Commercial Space Launch Act (CSLA).  Space Policy 21:227-229 August 2005.
The CSLA was enacted to assist the development of commercial, including passenger-carrying, launch vehicles.

Lewis, Jeffrey.  Space Control Isn't Freedom of Action.  Ad Astra 17:28-29 Fall 2005.
Focuses on the outer space control policy of the U.S. government. The objective of the space control mission is to ensure freedom of action in space for allied forces.  Among the factors that may influence satellite orbital crowding are the number of space launches and procedures to mitigate debris creation.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=19743037

Mirmina, Steven A.  Reducing the Proliferation of Orbital Debris:  Alternatives to a Legally Binding Instrument.   American Journal of International Law 99:649-662 July 2005.
Describes the scope of the threat posed by orbital debris and explains why immediate action to mitigate that threat is advised.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=929164471&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Neal, Valerie.  Space Policy and the Size of the Space Shuttle Fleet.  Space Policy 20:157-169 August 2004.

Viikari, Lotta.  Time is of the Essence:  Making Space Law More Effective.  Space Policy 21:1-5 February 2005.

White, Wayne.  Homesteading the High Frontier.  Ad Astra 17:32-35 Fall 2005.
Examines the provisions of commercial resource appropriations and outer space property rights under space law.

Worden, Simon P. and Correll, Randall R.  Leadership for New US Strategic Directions.  Space Policy 21:11-19 February 2005.

Zhao, Yun.  The 1972 Liability Convention:  Time for Revision?  Space Policy 20:117-122 May 2004.
The 1972 Liability Convention helps define liability for damage caused by space objects.  However, with more and more space activities taking place on a daily basis, along with the trend towards commercialization, the continued application of the Convention faces severe challenges.


Space Operations


General Information

Books

Air Force Space Command.  Air Force Space Command:  50 Years of Space & Missiles.  Tampa, FL, Faircount, [2004?].  104 p.
Book call no.:  358.80973 A2981

Bille, Matt and Lishock, Erika.  The First Space Race:  Launching the World's First Satellites.  College Station, Texas A&M University Press, 2004.  214 p. (Centennial of flight series; no. 8)
Book call no.:  629.46 B597f

Challenges to US Space Superiority.  Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, National Air and Space Intelligence Center, 2005.  24 p.
Includes chart:  "Five-Year Satellite Projections by Mission Type, 2005-2006", page 10.
Book call no.:  358.8 D437

Gonzales, Daniel.  The Changing Role of the U.S. Military in Space.  Santa Monica, CA , Rand, 1999.  58 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.rand.org/publications/MR/MR895/
Book call no.:  358.80973 G643c

Handberg, Roger.  Seeking New World Vistas:  The Militarization of Space.  Westport, CT, Praeger, 2000.  286 p.
Book call no.:  358.80973 H236s

Hays, Peter L.  Spacepower for a New Millennium:  Space and U.S. National Security.  New York, NY, McGraw-Hill, 2000.  308 p.
Book call no.:  358.80973 S7321

Hays, Peter L.  United States Military Space Into the Twenty-First Century.  Maxwell AFB, AL , Air University Press , [2002].  185 p. (INSS occasional paper; 42)
Also available online at:  http://www.usafa.af.mil.df/inss/OCP/OCP42f.pdf
Book call no.:  358.80973 H425u

Johnson, Dana J. and others.  Space:  Emerging Options for National Power.  Santa Monica, CA , Rand, 1998.  90 p.
Also available through the NetLibrary online book service. Please ask a librarian about access.
Book call no.:  358.8 J66s

Johnson, Stephen B.  The Secret of Apollo:  Systems Management in American and European Space Programs.  Baltimore, MD, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002.  290 p.
Book call no.:  629.40973 J69s

Lambakis, Steven James.  On the Edge of Earth:  The Future of American Space Power.  Lexington, KY, University Press of Kentucky, 2001.  365 p.
Book call no.:  387.80973 L219o

Lambeth, Benjamin S.  Mastering the Ultimate High Ground:  Next Steps in the Military Uses of Space.  Santa Monica, CA , RAND, Project Air Force, 2003.  193 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.rand.org/publications/MR/MR1649/
Book call no.:  358.80973 L223m

Report of the Commission to Assess United States National Security Space Management and Organization.  [Washington, DC] , The Commission, 2001.  1 v. (in various pagings)
Also available online at:  http://www.defenselink.mil/pubs/space20010111.html
Book call no.:  358.80973 R425

Smith, M. V.  Ten Propositions Regarding Spacepower.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air University Press, 2002.  140 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA407810
Doc. call no.:  358.80973 S655t

Spires, David N.  Orbital Futures:  Selected Documents in Air Force Space History.  Peterson AFB, CO, Air Force Space Command, United States Air Force, [2004].  2 vols. (1289 p.)
Book call no.:  358.80973 S759o

Temple, L. Parker III.  Shades of Gray:  National Security and the Evolution of Space Reconnaissance.  Reston, VA, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2005.  612 p.
Book call no.:  358.84 T286s

United States. Assistant Secretary of Defense for Command, Control Communications and Intelligence.  Department of Defense Space Technology Guide, FY 2000-01.  [Washington] , Office of the Secretary of Defense, 2001.  1 v. (various pagings)
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA393837
Book call no.:  358.30973 D419

United States. Congress. House. Committee on Armed Services. Strategic Forces Subcommittee.  Space Cadre/Space Professionals.  Washington, Government Printing Office, 2005.  143 p. (108th Congress, 2nd session, July 22, 2004)
Testimony on the development of a space cadre -- a group of space professionals from all areas:  military, industry and academia.
Book call no.:  358.80973 U583s

Walker, James and others.  Seize the High Ground:  The Army in Space and Missile Defense.  [Washington], Center of Military History, 2003.  1 v. (various pagings)
Book call no.:  358.8 W181s

Williamson, Mark.  Cambridge Dictionary of Space Technology.  Revised and expanded.  New York, Cambridge University Press, 2001.  464 p.
Book call no.:  629.403 W731d 2001

Documents

Costello, Eugene D.  USSTRATCOM:  The Continuing Transformation of Military Space.  Carlisle Barracks, PA, Army War College, 2004.  18 p.
This paper will determine if the merger between U.S. Space Command and U.S. Strategic Command enables the Department of Defense to transform its military space operations in order to engage and defend against emerging asymmetric threats.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA423321
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39080-537 C841u

Defense Space Activities:  Additional Actions Needed to Implement Human Capital Strategy and Develop Space Personnel:  Report to Congressional Committees.  Washington, U.S. General Accounting Office, 2004.  28 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d04697.pdf
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41026-173 no.04-697

Downey, James R., Forestier, James R., and Miller, David E.  Flying Reactors:  The Political Feasibility of Nuclear Power in Space.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air University, Air Force Fellows Program, April 2004.  99 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA425874
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42252-91 D748f

Levin, Robert E.  Defense Acquisitions:  Improvements Needed in Space Systems Acquisition Policy to Optimize Growing Investment in Space.  (Statement of Robert E. Levin, Director, Acquisitions and Sourcing Management, before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces, Committee on Armed Services, U.S. Senate).  [Washington] , U.S. General Accounting Office, 2003.  17 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA437078
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41026-173 no.04-253T

Rayermann, Patrick H.  Allocation of Army Resources to the Space Mission Area.  Carlisle Barracks, PA , Army War College, 2003.  48 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA414191
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39080-537 R266a

Ross, James P.  Developmental Test & Evaluation in Air Force Space Command:  A Plan for Meeting the Challenges of the 21st Century.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2002.  40 p.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 R8243d

Todd, Frank P.  Current National Space Security Trends and Implications for the Future.  Carlisle Barracks, PA, Army War College, 2002.  22 p.
Describes why space and its resources are of such vital interest to the U. S., presents the extent to which the military relies on space systems for command and control, analyzes whether outsourcing space capabilities is a viable alternative, and looks at current DoD space system replacement trends and reorganization efforts.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA401672
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39080-537 T633c

United States. General Accounting Office.  Defense Acquisitions:  Improvements Needed in Space Systems Acquisition Management Policy:  Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Defense, Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives.  [Washington] , U.S. General Accounting Office, 2003.  30 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d031073.pdf
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41026-173 no.03-1073

United States. Government Accountability Office.  Defense Acquisitions:  Space-Based Radar Effort Needs Additional Knowledge Before Starting Development:  Report to Congressional Committees.   Washington, DC, U.S. Government Accountability Office, [2004].  37 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d04759.pdf
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41026-173 no.04-759

United States. Government Accountability Office.  Defense Space Activities:  Management Guidance and Performance Measures Needed to Develop Personnel:  Report to Congressional Committees.  Washington, Government Accountability Office, 2005.  30 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d05833.pdf
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41026-173 no.05-833

Vernez, Georges.  Improving the Development and Utilization of Air Force Space and Missile Officers.  Santa Monica, CA , Rand, 2006.  130 p.
Table of contents available online at:  http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0515/2005018903.html
Doc. call no.:  358.80973 I34

Periodicals

Arana-Barradas, Louis.  Lifeline to the Warfighter.  Airman 50:4-11 Spring 2006.
Major Gen. William Shelton, commander of Joint Space Operations, coordinates all U.S. spacelift, on orbit satellite operations, global missile warning and space control on behalf of U.S. Strategic Command's Joint Functional Component Command for Space and Global Strike.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1024818431&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Arnold, David C.  Lt. Gen. Forrest S. McCartney:  The First Space Professional.  Air Power History 51:18-29 Winter 2004.

Brown, Kendall K.  Is Operationally Responsive Space the Future of Access to Space for the U.S. Air Force?  Air & Space Power Journal 20:11-18 Summer 2006.
The keystone of the operationally responsive space concept is a responsive launch capability. Without such space lift, improvements designed to establish suitable space assets and infrastructure will prove significantly less effective.
Also available online at:  http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj06/sum06/brown.html

Brown, Kendall K.  Space Power Integration:  Perspectives from Space Weapons Officers.  Air & Space Power Journal 20:11-18 Summer 2006.
Summarizes ideas presented at the first Space Weapons Officer Air and Space Integration Conference, held at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama in March 2005.  The conference papers have been published in a book, Space Power Integration Perspectives from Space Weapons Officers.
Also available online at:  http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj06/sum06/brown1.html

Cartwright, James E.  Statement of General James E. Cartwright, USMC Commander, United States Strategic Command, before the Strategic Forces Subcommittee on Space Policy, March 16, 2005.  Astropolitics 3:199-212 Summer 2005.
Discusses USSTRATCOM's role, including its space mission.

Doggrell, Les.  Operationally Responsive Space:  A Vision for the Future of Military Space.  Air & Space Power Journal 20:42-49 Summer 2006.
Also available online at:  http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj06/sum06/doggrell.html

Fredriksson, Brian E.  Space Power in Joint Operations:  Evolving Concepts.  Air & Space Power Journal 18:85-95 Summer 2004.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=659674601&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Hutto, Cal.  Developing Space Professionals.  Air & Space Power Journal 18:27-29 Summer 2004.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=659674461&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Iannotta, Ben.  Creating Robots for Space Repairs.  Aerospace America 43:36+ May 2005.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=16964511

Iannotta, Ben.  DART Aims at Space Rendezvous.  Aerospace America 43:26-30 March 2005.
Discusses NASA's Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technologies experiment, which will test the sensors, propulsion systems and software needed by U.S. spacecraft for conducting maneuvers in close proximity to other spacecraft, without help from human controllers or astronauts.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=16469777

Key Lawmaker Expresses Concern About Soaring Development Cost Of Military Space Programs.  Satellite News 29:1 March 1, 2006.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1005067831&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Lawson, Robert.  The Space Security Index.  Astropolitics 2:175-199 Summer 2004.
An excerpt from "Space Security 2003", published by the International Security Research and Outreach Programme of Canada's Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade.

Lord, Lance W.  Congressional Testimony of General Lance W. Lord, USAF, Commander, Air Force Space Command, before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Strategic Forces Subcommittee, United States Senate, Washington DC, 16 March 2005.  Astropolitics 3:213-231 Summer 2005.

Lord:  QDR Reinforces Critical Role of Space In Military Operations.  Satellite News 29:1 February 1, 2006.

Rivers, Brendan P.  USAF General Stresses Importance of Space.  Journal of Electronic Defense 27:30 November 2004.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=749485931&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Stumborg, Michael F.  Air Force Space Command:  A Transformation Case Study.  Air & Space Power Journal 20:79-88 Summer 2006.
Also available online at:  http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj06/sum06/stumborg.html

Szafranski, Richard and Kidd, Donald.  A Debate:  Will the Larger Air Force Ever Accept the Space Cadre?  Air & Space Power Journal 20:19-25 Summer 2006.
America’s foes are driving future engagements to the tactical level whenever possible and creating a need for more US expeditionary forces.  In this tactically oriented warfare environment, how can space forces operating at the strategic level of warfare from behind computer terminals far from the battlefield ever hope to integrate with their expeditionary brethren?
Also available online at:  http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj06/sum06/szafranski.html

Teets, Peter B.  National Security Space in the Twenty-First Century.  Air & Space Power Journal 18:4-8 Summer 2004.
During the past 10 years, space-based systems have enabled dramatic improvement in military and intelligence operations.  Due in large part to space systems, US military forces know more about their adversaries, see the battlefield more clearly, and can strike more quickly and precisely than any other military in history.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=659674441&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Teets, Peter B.  Statement...before the Strategic Forces Subcommittee on Space Policy, March 16, 2005.  Astropolitics 3:185-198 Summer 2005.
Discusses the US' National Security Space endeavors.

Ziarnick, Brent D.  Mahan on Space Education:  A Historical Rebuke of a Modern Error.  Air & Space Power Journal 19:63-70+ Winter 2005.
Author posits that the ideas of a 19th-century sea-power theorist remain relevant to the development of 21st-century space professionals -- especially those relating to the ongoing debate of technical versus nontechnical education for officers.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=995330771&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Near Space

Internet Resources

Moomey, Eric R.  Technical Feasibility of Loitering Lighter-Than-Air Near-Space Maneuvering Vehicles.  Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, Air Force Institute of Technology. Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, March 2005.  98 p. 
Available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA437762
The near-space region of earth's atmosphere is greatly underutilized.  Lighter-than-air maneuvering vehicles or airships, using the principle of buoyancy, can take advantage of this region to become potential platforms for precision navigation, environmental monitoring, communication relays, missile warning, surveillance, and weapon delivery.

Books

The Paradigm Shift to Effects-Based Space:  Near-Space as a Combat Space Effects Enabler.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air University. Center for Aerospace Doctrine Research and Education, January 2005.  77 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/cadre/ari%5F2005-01.pdf
Book call no.:  358.8 T661p

Periodicals

Air Force Chief Cites Vitality of 'Near Space' Capabilities.  Defense Daily 223:1 September 16, 2004.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=694154221&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Air Force Space Command Eyes Possibilities for Near-Space Platform.  Inside the Air Force 17:3 May 19, 2006.

Army Official Calls For More Investment In The "Near Space" Arena  Satellite News 27:1 December 20, 2004.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=768794271&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Dietrich, George B. and Goldstein, William C.  Collective Trusteeship for Near Space:  The Case for UNNESA.  Space Policy 14:9-14 February 1998.
Examines the need to determine what source of legal authority will govern commercial activities in space development activity.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=887833

Fixed-wing Unmanned Aircraft Are Air Force's Best Near-Space Option.  Defense Daily 229:1 February 15, 2006.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=958960631&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Hutson, Stu.  Blimps on Guard.  New Scientist 189:28 February 11-February 17, 2006.
Near-space blimps are attracting increasing interest from the US military.  Serving as a type of low-orbit, low-cost satellite, blimps will be used for communication, surveillance, and missile detection.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=959525241&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Lawlor, Maryann.  Near Space Fills Communications Gap.  Signal 60:25 November 2005.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=928877591&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

McKenna, Ted.  US Congress Questions Skyrocketing Space Costs  Journal of Electronic Defense 28:29 September 2005.
Could "near-space" technology, in some cases, eliminate the need for more expensive space-based technology?  Operating at altitudes of 65,000 feet or more, near-space aircraft would not have the high launch costs associated with space vehicles, yet could provide some of the same capabilities.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=897762591&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Morris, Jefferson.  Air Force Backs Away from Near-Space Maneuvering Vehicle  Aerospace Daily & Defense Report 213:1 March 18, 2005.
The U.S. Air Force Space Battlelab has backed away from the Near-Space Maneuvering Vehicle (NSMV) following a series of technical problems that have caused redesigns and scuttled flight attempts.

Morris, Jefferson.  Air Force 'Not Totally Sold' on Near-Space Yet, Lord Says.  Aerospace Daily & Defense Report 213:5 March 10, 2005 .
Although it is intrigued by the possible advantages of near-space altitudes, the U.S. Air Force will not be "sold" until it answers some tough questions about its value and the difficulty of operating there, according to Gen. Lance Lord.

"Near Space" Becomes First Effort in USAF "Joint Warfighting Space".  Inside the Air Force 15:13-14 December 24, 2004.

Scott, William B.  The Fringe of Space.  Aviation Week & Space Technology 164:60-61 January 30, 2006.
A hybrid near-space vehicle tailored to fill military and homeland security tactical capability gaps could revolutionize the commercial remote-sensing and cellphone-communication sectors.  Article describes MaXflyer, viewed as a tactical near-space platform to provide persistent ISR and communications.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=973191091&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Scott, William B.  Near-Space Frontier.  Aviation Week & Space Technology 162:71-72 February 14, 2005.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=16186601

Scott, William B.  Quick-Response Milspace.  Aviation Week & Space Technology 162:148-150 June 13, 2005.
Reports on a demonstration featuring a "near-space" platform serving as a high-altitude communications relay.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=17407482

Sirak, Michael.  Fixed-Wing Unmanned Aircraft are Air Force's Best Near-Space Option.  Defense Daily 229:2-4 February 15, 2006.

Stephens, Hampton.  Near-Space.  Air Force Magazine 88:36-40 July 2005.
Focuses on the exploitation of near-space, the region sandwiched between an altitude of about 12 and 62 miles, as a key operating area. Discusses technical complexities of the zone.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&an=17504113

Steves, Mark.  Near Space 2015:  A Conceptual Vision of Near-Space Operations.  Air & Space Power Journal 20:110-117 Summer 2006.
Presents a fictional account of an Air Force unit in 2015. In this scenario, from a perch too high for most aircraft to reach, but too low for most space objects to orbit, airships provide reconnaissance and communication services for military operations ranging from combat missions to humanitarian assistance.
Also available online at:  http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj06/sum06/steves.html

Tomme, Ed and Dahl, Sigfred.  Balloons in Today's Military?  An Introduction to the Near-Space Concept.  Air & Space Power Journal 19:39-49+ Winter 2005.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=854123441&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD


Space Warfare and Weapons


Books

Alexander, John B.  Winning the War:  Advanced Weapons, Strategies, and Concepts for the Post-9/11 World.  New York , Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin's Press, 2003.  304 p.
Includes a chapter on Rethinking Space Missions.
Book call no.:  355.020973 A376w

Carey, Steven D.  An Executive Guide to Space:  A Starting Point for Understanding Space in the New Millennium.  Santa Monica, CA, Rand, 2000.  68 p.
Book call no.:  358.80973 C276e

Eisendrath, Craig R., Goodman, Melvin A., and Marsh, Gerald E.  The Phantom Defense:  America's Pursuit of the Star Wars Illusion.  Westport, CT, Praeger, 2001.  190 p.
Book call no.:  358.1740973 E36p

FitzGerald, Frances.  Way Out There in the Blue:  Reagan, Star Wars, and the End of the Cold War.  New York , Simon & Schuster, 2000.  592 p.
Book call no.:  973.927 F553w

Future Security in Space:  Commercial, Military, and Arms Control Trade-Offs, edited by James Clay Moltz.  Monterey, CA , Monterey Institute of International Studies, 2002.  69 p.
Book call no.:  358.8 M729f

Grossman, Karl.  Weapons in Space .  New York , Seven Stories Press, 2001.  [88] p.
Book call no.:  355.8 G878w

Handberg, Roger.  Seeking New World Vistas:  The Militarization of Space.  Westport, CT, Praeger, 2000.  286 p.
Book call no.:  358.80973 H236s

Hoverstein, Michael R.  The Law Governing Aerospace Warfare in the Twenty-First Century.  Montreal, Quebec, Institute of Air and Space Law, McGill University, 2000.  136 p.
Space Law and Related Treaties, pp 24-28; Chapter 5:  Role and Effect of Space-Based Assets, pp 90-109.
Book call no.:  341.6 H845L

Krepon, Michael and with Christopher Clary.  Space Assurance or Space Dominance?:  The Case Against Weaponizing Space.  Washington, DC, Henry L. Stimson Center, 2003.  131 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.stimson.org/pubs.cfm?ID=81
Book call no.:  358.8 K92s

O'Hanlon, Michael E.  Neither Star Wars nor Sanctuary:  Constraining the Military Uses of Space.  Washington, DC, Brookings Institution Press, 2004.  173 p.
To date, no country deploys destructive weapons in space, for use against space or Earth targets, and no country possesses ground-based weapons designed explicitly to damage objects in space.  The line between nonweaponization and weaponization is blurry, to be sure - but it has not yet been crossed. The author makes a case for keeping it this way.
Book call no.:  358.8 O36n

Preston, Bob.  Space Weapons:  Earth Wars.  Santa Monica, CA , Rand, 2002.  201 p
Contents include:  How Might the United States Acquire Space Weapons?; How Might Others Acquire Space Weapons?; Space-Based Directed-Energy Weapons; Kinetic-Energy Space Weapons; Natural Meteoroides as Weapons; Ballistic Missile Defense Countermeasures.
Also available online at:  http://www.rand.org/publications/MR/MR1209/
Book call no.:  358.80973 S7323

Ramey, Robert A.  Space Warfare and the Future Law of War.  Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, Air Force Institute of Technology, 1999.  197 p.
Book call no.:  358.8 R172s

Spacy, William L.  Does the United States Need Space-Based Weapons?  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air University Press, 1999.  120 p.(CADRE paper; 3)
Includes:  Defending space-based assets; technological factors bearing on space-based weapons; ground-based alternatives for space control; defensive counterspace; offensive counterspace; nondestructive approaches to offensive counterspace; destructive approaches to offensive counterspace.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA391888
Book call no.:  358.88 S732d

Documents

Aydin, Ahmet Tarik.  Orbit Selection and EKV Guidance for Space-Based ICBM Intercept.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2005.  118 p.
This thesis investigates the requirements and limitations of the U.S. space-based ICBM defense against North Korea, Iran and China by introducing an ICBM trajectory prediction, selecting an orbit for exoatmospheric kill vehicles (EKV) and developing a hybrid guidance algorithm.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA439839
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42525 A9753o

Baldauff, Regis J.  By Deploying Weapons in Space, Is the United States Opening a Theater of Engagement that Could Disadvantage the United States in the Long Term?  Fort Leavenworth, KS, Army Command and General Staff College, 2001.  104 p.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022 B175d

Douglas, Michael L. and Gray, Arlene J.  The Warfighter's Counterspace Threat Analysis (WCTA):  A Framework for Evaluating Counterspace Threats.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2000.  82 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA384609
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42525 D735w

Fredriksson, Brian E.  Fires From Heaven:  The Application of Force Through Space.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2002.  43 p.
Proposes that weapons systems that transit through space offer the advantages of global reach, unprecedented response times, and minimal forward footprint, without the provocative nature and inherent vulnerabilities of space based systems.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 F852f

Gibson, Robert D.  Space Power:  The Revolution in Military Affairs.  Carlisle Barracks, PA , Army War College , 2001. 19 p.
Argues that three things must occur for the US to maintain its position as the world's preeminent space power:  the idea of weapons in space should be recognized as inevitable; space should be recognized as a distinct and legitimate Area of Responsibility in the Unified Command Plan; and the Defense Department should create a separate Space Corps under the auspices of the Air Force.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA390639
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39080-537 G449s

Gleason, Donald L.  Geopolitical Aspects of Weaponizing Space.  Carlisle Barracks, PA, Army War College, 2002.  31 p.
As the United States political and military leaders explore weaponizing space, many questions arise. What is the threat to space-based assets?  What are the options to counter those threats? The author explores diplomacy as an alternate option.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA400790
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39080-537 G554g

Newberry, Robert D.  Spacepower as a Coercive Force.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air War College, [2003].  44 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA424819
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43117 N5342s

Oldenburg, James A.  In Orbit Basing of an Anti-Satellite Mission.  Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, Air Force Institute of Technology, 2001.  1 v. (various pagings)
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39567-5 O44i

Ruhm, Brian C.  Finding the Middle Ground:  The U.S. Air Force, Space Weaponization, and Arms Control.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2003.  67 leaves.
Recommends an alternative strategy for realizing US space control and space force application capabilities, based on deployable (vice orbiting) systems.  US development of an Expeditionary Space Force would be one element of a comprehensive strategy that would include changes to US space architecture and cooperative measures with other countries.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA424882
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 R9331f

Shumate, James R.  Information Weaponization of Space.  Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2001. 16 p.
Discusses offensive counterspace operations and specifically how information weaponization of space will allow the operational planner to obtain information superiority in the battlespace.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA393531
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41662 S5621i

Summers, Thomas A.  How Is U. S. Space Power Jeopardized by an Adversary's Exploitation, Technological Developments, Employment and Engagement of Laser Antisatellite Weapons?  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2000.  53 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA425117
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 S9553h

Taylor, Kirk D.  Arming the Skies:  The Right Time Has Not Arrived.  Fort Leavenworth, KS, School of Advanced Military Studies, Army Command and General Staff College, 2000.  46 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA395132
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022-2 T2431a

Periodicals

Ackerman, Robert K.  Space Vulnerabilities Threaten U.S. Edge in Battle.  Signal 59:41-44 June 2005.
The proliferation of space technologies around the world poses a threat to the space assets on which the US military is relying to ensure battlespace supremacy in the 21st century.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=856118491&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Baines, Philip J.  Non-Offensive Defences:  Space Protection without Space-Based Weapons.  Astropolitics 2:149-174 Summer 2004.
Argues that developments designed to protect space systems from negation by other actors can increase their survivability without the need for space-based weapons riding shotgun or providing armed escort for the satellites of these systems.

Baucom, Donald R.  The Rise and Fall of Brilliant Pebbles I.  Journal of Social, Political, and Economic Studies 29:143-190 Summer 2004.
Traces the history of U.S. research into the development of a system of space-based missile interceptors known as Brilliant Pebbles.  Equipped with sensors, these kinetic-kill vehicles were designed to locate and collide with incoming ballistic missiles, destroying them before they could reach their targets.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=693760371&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Chun, Clayton K. S.  Viewpoint:  Expanding the High Frontier:  Space Weapons in History.  Astropolitics 2:63-78 Spring 2004.

Coyle, Philip E. and Rhinelander, John B.  Space Weapons:  Alternatives for Today.  Astropolitics 2:201-213 Summer 2004.

Gouveia, William Jr.  Assessment of Anti-Satellite Capabilities and their Strategic Limitations.  Astropolitics 3:163-184 Summer 2005.
Includes an analysis of China's ASAT program, pp 175-178.

Graham, Thomas Jr.  Space Weapons and The Risk of Accidental Nuclear War.  Arms Control Today 35:12-16 December 2005.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=958960631&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Hallman, Wesley.  A Fast-Following Space Control Strategy.  Astropolitics 3:35-42 Spring 2005.
Can the US afford being second to weaponize space?  The author argues that it can, and should be.

Hui Zhang.  Action/Reaction:  U.S. Space Weaponization and China.  Arms Control Today 35:6-11 December 2005.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=959525241&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Klein, John J.  Space Warfare:  A Maritime-Inspired Space Strategy.  Astropolitics 2:33-61 Spring 2004.
Argues that by using Sir Julian Corbett's maritime model, a space theory can be derived to predict concerns and develop ideas not currently recognized.

Marks, Paul.  Space Weapons Could Make Orbit a No-Fly Zone.  New Scientist 190:30-31 April 15-21, 2006.

McKenna, Ted.  Are Space-Based Weapons Inevitable?  Journal of Electronic Defense 28:10 June 2005.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=854123441&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

MDA Considers Space Layer For Ballistic Missile Defense.  Defense Daily 226:1 April 13, 2005.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=821291871&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Plieninger, Andrew.  All Along the Watchtower:  Safeguarding American Space Dominance.  Ad Astra 17:26-47 Fall 2005.
Considers the use of space weaponry to preserve and protect space systems owned by the U.S. government.  Among the factors that affect the deployment of space vehicles are industry consolidation and declining workforce.


Spacelift and Launching


Books

Brown, Kendall K.  Technology Challenges for Operationally Responsive Spacelift.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Airpower Research Institute, College of Aerospace Doctrine, Research and Education, Air University, 2004.  39 p.
Book call no.:  629.47 B878t

Lardas, Mark.  Space Shuttle Launch System, 1972-2004.  Osceola, WI , Osprey Direct USA, 2004.  48 p.
Book call no.:  629.441 L321s

Launius, Roger D. and Jenkins, Dennis R.  To Reach the High Frontier:  A History of U.S. Launch Vehicles.  Lexington, KY, University Press of Kentucky, 2002.  519 p.
Book call no.:  629.475 T627

Ward, John E.  Reusable Launch Vehicles and Space Operations.  Maxwell Air Force Base, AL, Center for Strategy and Technology, Air War College, Air University, 1999.  77 p. (Occasional paper; no. 12)
Concludes that the U.S. military should move away from the spacelift business by obtaining spacelift through commercially procured launch services, and second, that the U.S. military should not develop militarized RLVs that are designed to perform the traditional air operations in space.
Also available online at:  https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2000/csat/csat12.pdf
Book call no.:  623.4519 W259r

Documents

Decker, Raymond J, Allard, Wayne, and Nelson, Bill.  Defense Space Activities:  Continuation of Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle Program's Progress to Date Subject to Some Uncertainty.  Washington, U.S. General Accounting Office, [2004].  37 p.
Also available online at:  http://purl.access.gpo.gov/GPO/LPS51315
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41026-173 no.04-778R

Hook, David E.  For Want of a Nail:  An Assessment of Global Positioning System Satellite Replenishment.  Fort Leavenworth, KS, School of Advanced Military Studies, Army Command and General Staff College, 2004.  92 p.
Investigates whether the Air Force should forgo its launch-to-sustain replenishment strategy in favor of a more aggressive launch-to-augment strategy, in order to proactively replace high-risk satellites and to accelerate modernization timelines.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA428995
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022-2 H781f

Lawrence, Timothy J.  Building A Cadre of Space Professionals with Responsive Lift.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2003.  39 leaves.
Offers a conceptual design of a nanosatellite launcher and attempts to show that a low cost launch system could be developed.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 L423b

Smith, Marcia S.  Space Launch Vehicles:  Government Activities, Commercial Competition, and Satellite Exports.  [Washington] , Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, 2005.  16 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/space/IB93062.pdf
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42953-8 no.93062

Stanley, Robert W.  Spacelift:  The Achilles' Heel of American Space Power.  Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2002.  [23] p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA401126
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41662 S788s

Periodicals

Brody, Dave.  Thinking Differently With Space Elevators.  Ad Astra 18:34-36 Summer 2006.

Brown, Kendall K.  Is Operationally Responsive Space the Future of Access to Space for the U.S. Air Force?  Air & Space Power Journal 20:11-18 Summer 2006.
The keystone of the operationally responsive space (ORS) concept is a responsive launch capability. Without such space lift, improvements designed to establish suitable space assets and infrastructure will prove significantly less effective.
Also available online at:  http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj06/sum06/brown.html

Caceres, Marco.  Declining Trend for U. S. Launch Capabilities.  Aerospace America 44:14-16 April 2006.
Includes charts:  (1) rockets launched in 1996-2005 (U.S., former Soviet, other); (2) launches in 2004 and 2005, by rocket type.

Caceres, Marco.  Launch Market Takes a Wrong Turn.  Aerospace America 43:12-13 February 2005.
Fewer than 60 launch missions were attempted in 2004.  Part of the problem continues to be a relative lack of commercial satellites available for launch.

Caceres, Marco.  Near-Term Outlook for Satellite Launches.  Aerospace America 43:16-18 April 2005.
Explores the trend in global space shuttle launches for the year 2004.  Total number of U.S. launches to Earth orbit; Number of resupply or manned missions; Percentage increase in the number of satellites/capsules launched.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=16784456

Chase, Ramon L.  Designing a Responsive Space Launch Vehicle.  Aerospace America 44:26-27 May 2006.

Hancock, Randy.  Provisions of the Commercial Space Launch Act (CSLA).  Space Policy 21:227-229 August 2005.
The CSLA was enacted to assist the development of commercial, including passenger-carrying, launch vehicles.

Iannotta, Ben.  Nanotubes Lift Hopes for Space Elevator.  Aerospace America 44:30-35 March 2006.
Using a nanotube material 100 times stronger than steel and one-sixth the weight, an ultrathin ribbon stretching 62,000 miles into space would let satellites "climb" into orbit. This concept could have profound geopolitical and environmental impacts.

Scott, William B.  Fighters as Spacelift:  Can Tactical Aircraft Serve as a First Stage for Lofting Military Microsatellites into Orbit?  Aviation Week & Space Technology 158:72-74 April 7, 2003.
Discusses Air Force Research Laboratory plans for flight tests of a quick-response, microsatellite launch vehicle (MSLV), to determine the feasibility of air-launching a 3-stage booster from an F-15E fighter.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=323294611&Fmt=7&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Wood, Gregory E.  The Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle:  Tough Decisions to Assure Access to Space.  Air & Space Power Journal 20:101-109 Summer 2006.
Also available online at:  http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj06/sum06/wood.html


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