SPECIAL OPERATIONS 2010
Special Bibliography No. 328
Supplement No. 1


June 2010

Compiled by Bibliography Branch
Muir S. Fairchild Research Information Center
Maxwell AFB, AL


Contents

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All sites listed were last accessed June 17, 2010.


General Information


Internet Resources

Air University Research Information Management System (AURIMS)
Available online at:  http://www.afresearch.org
Offers access to Air University student research reports with numerous items concerning Special Operations Forces.  Offers an internal search engine for keyword searching.  Also provides access to AU Press books, the AU Blue Dart System, AF Research Institute, and the Air & Space Power Journal.  Restricted site.

Executive Report:  JSOU (Joint Special Operations University) Second Annual Symposium.  Irregular Warfare:  Strategic Utility of SOF; 30 April—3 May 2007.  Hurlburt Field, FL, JSOU Press, May 3, 2007.  24 p.
Available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA511947
Second Annual Symposium Executive Report.

Malvesti, Michele L.  Time for Action:  Redefining SOF Missions and Activities.  Center for a New American Security, December 2009.
Available online at:  http://www.cnas.org/files/documents/publications/SOF_malvesti_Dec2009_code304_policybrief_0.pdf
(If link does not open, copy url and paste into your browser address bar).

Miess, Sam.  Private Sector Efforts to Relieve the Burden of SOF Forces.  Washington, DC, February 10-12, 2009.
Available online at:  http://www.dtic.mil/ndia/2009SOLIC/Miesswhitepaper.pdf
20th Annual National Defense Industrial Association Special Operations/Low Intensity Conflict Symposium & Exhibition, White Paper.

Air War College Gateway:  Special Operations
Available online at:  http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/awc-sof.htm
Air Force sponsored gateway to numerous links to an array of Special Operations topics.

Sullivan, Michael P.  How to Win and Know It:  An Effects-Based Approach to Irregular Warfare.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, December 2007.  71 p.
Available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA476057
"To succeed in IW.  The commander and staff need a campaign planning system that answers two primary questions:  'How do you effectively focus on controlling or influencing populations?' and, 'How do you measure your efforts in IW?'  The answer maybe a 'marriage' of an effects-based thinking with the concepts outlined in the new IW JOC.  This thesis will analyze the potential of such a concept utilizing a case study of Special Operations Command Pacific’s own effects-based approach to the War on Terror."--Abstract.

United States.  Department of the Air Force.  Air Force Doctrine Document 2-7:  Special Operations.  December 16, 2005.
Available online at:  http://www.e-publishing.af.mil/shared/media/epubs/AFDD2-7.pdf
Establishes U.S. Air Force doctrinal guidance for Special Operations.

United States.  Department of the Army.  Doctrine and Training Publications:  31 Series Collection (Special Operations).
Available online at:  http://www.army.mil/usapa/doctrine/31_Series_Collection_1.html
Official U.S. Army website offers links to 25 active field manuals and soldiers manuals dealing with various aspects of U.S. Army Special Operations Forces.

United States.  Joint Chiefs of Staff.  Joint Electronic Library.  Washington, DC.
Available online at:  http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/index.html
Access to JCS publications and doctrine documents.

United States.  Joint Chiefs of Staff.  Joint Publication 3-05:  Doctrine for Joint Special Operations.  Washington, DC, December 17, 2003.
Available online at:  http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/new_pubs/jp3_05.pdf
This publication provides the overarching doctrinal guidance for the conduct of joint special operations (SO) across the full range of military operations.


Internet Resource (Student Research)

Markland, Thomas.  Air Power in Irregular Warfare.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air War College, 2009.  33 p.
Available online at:  https://www.afresearch.org/
"This paper opens with an historical survey of air power's extensive use in irregular warfare.  These experiences are then contrasted with a review of the halting development of IW doctrine.  Next the pros and cons of two organizational options, either standing up an IW Wing(s) or assigning the mission to USSOCOM, are analyzed.  The paper concludes with recommendations for building a balanced capability, integrating doctrine, and consolidating these efforts with with education, training and exercises."--Abstract.


Books

Alexander, John B.  Africa:  Irregular Warfare on the Dark Continent.  Hurlburt Field, FL, JSOU Press, 2009.  81 p.
"Dr. John Alexander’s current JSOU Press monograph provides an assessment of the African continent with a particular focus on how Special Operations Forces (SOF) may need to operate and how the local environment impacts these operations."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA514538
Book call no.:  355.03306 A376a

Alexander, John B.  The Changing Nature of Warfare, the Factors Mediating Future Conflict, and Implications for SOF.  Hurlbert Field, FL, JSOU Press, 2006.  46 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA495541
Book call no.:  356.16 A376c

Brailey, Malcolm.  Transformation of Special Operations Forces in Contemporary Conflict:  Strategy, Missions, Organisation and Tactics.  Duntroon ACT 2600, Australia, Land Warfare Studies Centre, November 2005.  56 p.
A study of the recent transformation in the employment and structure of Special Operations Forces.  The author argues that these forces have moved from a marginal part of traditional conventional strategy towards being a central component of any government war fighting or national security response.
Also available online at:  http://www.defence.gov.au/army/lwsc/Docs/WP_127.pdf
Book call no.:  356.16730994 B814s

Couch, Dick.  Chosen Soldier:  The Making of a Special Forces Warrior.  New York, Crown Publishers, 2007.  396 p.
Book call no.:  356.16 C853c

Freier, Nathan.  DoD Leaders, Strategists, and Operators in an Era of Persistent Unconventional Challenge.  Washington, DC, Center for Strategic and International Studies, 2009.  41 p.
"This study argues that the future security environment will be dominated by unconventional threats and challenges that lie outside the boundaries of traditional warfighting.  This is the new defense and national security status quo."--Publisher.
Book call no.:  355.033573 F862d

Henriksen, Thomas H.  The Israeli Approach to Irregular Warfare and Implications for the United States.  Hurlbert Field, FL, JSOU Press, February 2007.  48 p.
This publication discusses the formation, development, and employment of Israeli Special Operations Forces.
Also available online at:  https://http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA495467
Book call no.:  356.16095694 H518i

Horn, Bernd and Balasevicius, Tony.  Casting Light on the Shadows:  Canadian Perspectives on Special Operations Forces.  Kingston, Ont, Canadian Defence Academy Press, 2007.  324 p.
Book call no.:  355.033573 F862d

Jane’s Amphibious and Special Forces.  Coulsdon, Surrey, UK, Alexandria, VA, Jane’s Information Group, 2010.  675 p.
Book call no.:  355.46 J331

Kiras, James.  Special Operations and Strategy:  From World War II to the War on Terrorism.  New York, Routledge, 2006.  230 p.
"This book examines how special operations, in conjunction with more conventional military actions, can achieve and sustain strategic effect(s) over time, and argues that the root of their effectiveness lies in understanding the relationship that exists between moral and material attrition at the strategic level through an examination of strategic theory and case studies."--Book Jacket.
Book call no.:  356.1609045 K58s

Martinage, Robert C.  Special Operations Forces:  Future Challenges and Opportunities.  Washington, DC, Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, 2008.  105 p.
This monograph asserts that when the next presidential administration takes over the reins of the executive branch in January 2009, serious consideration should be given to the organizational and policy changes, investments, and reorientation of special operations forces (SOF) detailed here.  This paper is not meant to provide the definitive answer for how SOF should be shaped, sized, organized, and postured to better prepare for the challenges posed and opportunities afforded by the future security environment, but rather to identify the critical issues that must be debated and expeditiously addressed.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA491329
Book call no.:  356.160973 M383s

Olson, Eric T.  Statement of Admiral Eric T. Olson, U.S. Navy Commander United States Special Operations Command Before the Senate Armed Services Committee on the Posture of Special Operations Forces, March 24, 2008.  Washington, DC, Senate Armed Services Committee, 2008.  24 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.dod.mil/dodgc/olc/docs/testOlson080304.pdf
Book call no.:  356.160973 O53s

Powers, James F.  Filling Special Operations Gaps with Civilian Expertise.  Hurlbert Field, FL, JSOU Press, 2006.  56 p.
This monograph posits using civilians to fill emerging, nontraditional, special operations-related skill and competency gaps.  It should be of interest to government, military, and industry readers who would like to learn about existing international law, U.S. law, and DoD policy relating to the use of civilians to accompany U.S. Armed Forces in general as well as accessing civilian expertise to fill emerging special operations requirements in particular.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA507336
Book call no.:  356.160973 P888f

Spulak, Robert G.  A Theory of Special Operations:  The Origin, Qualities, and Use of SOF.  Hurlburt Field, FL, JSOU Press, 2007.  45 p.
Dr. Spulak expands Admiral McRaven's work - Spec. Ops:  Case Studies in Special Operations Warfare:  Theory and Practice - beyond direct action and small raid concepts and builds a theory of SOF.  The book offers sections on:  Relationships Between Conventional Forces and SOF, the Origin of SOF, SOF and Ultimate Sources of Friction, and Strategic Applications of SOF.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA495521
Book call no.:  356.160973 S772t

Tierney, John J.  Chasing Ghosts:  Unconventional Warfare in American History.  Washington, DC, Potomac Books, 2006.  289 p.
Book call no.:  355.3430973 T564c

Tucker, David and Lamb, Christopher J.  United States Special Operations Forces.  New York, Columbia University Press, 2007.  290 p.
"In this book, two national security experts and Department of Defense insiders put the exploits of America’s special operations forces in historical and strategic context.  David Tucker and Christopher J. Lamb offer an incisive overview of America’s turbulent experience with special operations."--Book Jacket.
Book call no.:  356.160973 T891u

Turbiville, Graham Hal.  Russian Special Forces:  Issues of Loyalty, Corruption and the Fight Against Terror.  Hurlburt Field, FL, JSOU Press, August 2005.  27 p.
"Dr. Graham Turbiville offers the reader insight about the status and capabilities of Russia's special operations forces (SOF).  The paper reminds planners that they will need to develop realistic expectations of performance and reliability when dealing with a number of other foreign SOF units as they pursue multinational operations."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA495392
Book call no.:  356.160947 T931r

Turnley, Jessica Glicken.  Retaining a Precarious Value as Special Operations Go Mainstream.  Hurlbert Field, FL, JSOU Press, February 2008 .  34 p.
"A short monograph on the concept of organizational identity or organizational culture and the difficulty of developing and retaining these in the face of changing organizational structures and institutional growth.  The discussion cuts to the heart of what it means to be SOF vice what it means to be a member of USSOCOM."  In the current organization, this is not synonymous since a significant percentage of the command is made up of non-SOF members assigned from the various services.  They represent a critical element within the command and the SOF community.--JSOU web site.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA495335
Book call no.:  356.16 T955r

United States.  Congress.  House.  Committee on Armed Services.  Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee.  Irregular Warfare and Stability Operations:  Approaches to Interagency Integration.  Hearing.  110th Congress, 2nd session, February 26, 2008.  Washington, DC, U.S. G.P.O., 2009.  105 p. 
Also available online at:  http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=110_house_hearings&docid=f:43782.pdf
Book call no.:  356.16 U58i

United States.  Congress.  House.  Committee on Armed Services.  Subcommittee on Terrorism, Unconventional Threats and Capabilities.  Hearing on National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009 and Oversight of Previously Authorized Programs Before the Committee on Armed Services, House of Representatives, One Hundred Tenth Congress, Second Session:  Terrorism, Unconventional Threats and Capabilities Subcommittee Hearing on Budget Request for U.S. Special Operations Command and U.S. Northern Command, Hearing Held March 5, 2008.  Washington, DC, U.S. G.P.O., 2009.  97 p.
Also available online at:  http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=110_house_hearings&docid=f:43668.pdf
Book call no.:  355.622973 U582d 2009h

United States.  Congress.  House.  Committee on Armed Services.  Terrorism, Unconventional Threats and Capabilities Subcommittee.  Special Operations Command:  Transforming for the Long War.  Hearing.  109th Congress, 2nd session, March 8, 2006.  Washington, GPO, 2007.  81 p.
U.S. Special Operations Command --Appropriations and Expenditures.
Book call no.:  356.160973 U581s

United States.  Congress.  House of Representatives.  Committee on Armed Services.  Assessing U.S. Special Operations Command's Missions and Roles.   Hearing.  109th Congress, 2nd session, June 29, 2008.  Washington, GPO, 2008.  51 p.
Book call no.:  356.160973 U581a

United States.  Office of the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction.  Quarterly Report and Semiannual Report to the United States Congress/Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction.  Arlington, VA, Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction, January 30, 2010.  1 vol.
U.S. and Iraqi Special Operations Forces are mentioned throughout the report.
Web Link:  Full text PDF version, select desired quarterly report from list.
Also available online at:  http://www.sigir.mil/publications/quarterlyreports/index.html
Book call no.:  956.70443 U584q

Yarger, Harry R.  Educating for Strategic Thinking in the SOF Community:  Considerations and a Proposal.  Hurlburt Field, FL, JSOU Press, 2007.  29 p.
Examines the issue of strategic thinking in SOF:  What is the future need and how should the community develop and better inculcate strategic thinking in its members?
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA495549
Book call no.:  356.160973 Y28e

Zimmerman, Dwight Jon and Gresham, John D.  Beyond Hell and Back:  How America's Special Operations Forces Became the World's Greatest Fighting Unit.  New York, St. Martin's Press, 2007.  320 p.
Book call no.:  356.160973 Z72b


Documents

Best, Richard A.  Special Operations Forces (SOF) and CIA Paramilitary Operations:  Issues for Congress.  Washington, DC, Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, August 2009.  9 p.
Library Has:  2005:Jan.4, 2009:Aug.3.  This Report will describe special operations conducted by DOD and paramilitary operations conducted by the CIA and discuss the background of the 9/11 Commission’s recommendations.
Also available online at:  http://opencrs.com/document/RS22017/2009-08-03/
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42953-1 no.-RS22017

Peaks, Matthew K.  Considerations for Special Operations Forces in Domestic Homeland Security:  A Monograph.  Fort Leavenworth, KS, School of Advanced Military Studies, Army Command and General Staff College, 2008.  66 p.
"The purpose of this monograph is to ascertain what missions are appropriate for Special Operations Forces (SOF) in a domestic setting under the auspices of Defense Support to Civil Authorities (DSCA) and Homeland Defense (HD)."--Abstract.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022-2 P357c

U.S. Special Operations Forces (SOF):  Background and Issues for Congress.  Washington, DC, Congressional Research Service, August 03, 2009.  8 p.
Updated on an irregular basis.
Also available online at:  http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/natsec/RS21048.pdf
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42953-1 no.RS21048


Documents (Student Research)

Bowen, Gary Russell.  Is It Time to Designate Coast Guard Special Operations Forces?  Fort Leavenworth, KS, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, June 2005.  188 p.
"This qualitative thesis examines the Coast Guard’s historic participation in special operations and a potential national requirement for designated Coast Guard special operations forces. … The Coast Guard’s domestic missions have made it useful for niche missions in conflict, but Goldwater-Nichols overlooked Title 14, U.S. Code.  There is no reason today administratively to transfer the Coast Guard to the Navy Department because neither the Secretary nor the Chief of Naval Operations is a warfighting commander.  Likewise, Congress overlooked the Coast Guard when it created U.S. Special Operations Command.”--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA443195
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022 B7861i

Edwards, Steven G.  Why SOF Is the Military Force of Choice for AFRICOM.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, April 2008.  32 p.
"The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate why special operations forces (SOF) possess the experience and unique capabilities needed to be the primary military force used in support of AFRICOM."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  https://www.afresearch.org/
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 E265w

Gross, Richard C.  Different Worlds:  Unacknowledged Special Operations and Covert Action.  Carlisle Barracks, PA, U.S. Army War College, 2009.  22 p.
"This paper will examine the statutory and doctrinal definitions of covert action, to include the "traditional military activities" exception to the law; the legal requirements for using covert action as defined in law; and the policy issues surrounding the use of covert action."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA494716
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39080-537 G8782d

Negulescu, Florinel Constantin.  The Principles of Strategic Combined Joint Special Operations.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2009.  69 p.
As a consequence of the international terrorism threat within the context of globalization, there is an increased likelihood for Strategic Combined Joint Special Operations to be used in the future as an efficient method for solving potential international crises.  This thesis proposes the following principles:  a balance between common and national interest, intelligence sharing, interoperability, and a division of responsibilities, as the key factors for the success of Strategic Combined Joint Special Operations.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA501473
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42525 N394p

Taylor, Steven C.  The NATO Special Operations Forces Transformation Initiative:  Opportunities and Challenges.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2009.  85 p.
"This thesis investigates the extent to which NATO requires robust special operations capabilities similar to U.S. capabilities in order to respond to current and future threats.  Because threats in the post-11 September 2001 environment are largely unconventional, NATO must develop a capability that can meet these threats in kind."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA497246
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42525 T2461n


Periodicals

Coughran, David P.  SF and the Art of Influence.  Special Warfare 20:15-19 September-October 2007.
FM 3-05.20, Special Forces Operations, puts it succinctly:  SF soldiers use their interpersonal skills to get the desired action from a foreign counterpart. [...] the benefit of discussing these techniques, naming them and compiling them into a list makes it substantially easier to plan with them.  No military operation in the U.S. Army is performed without some level of planning.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1345215021&sid=3&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Counterterror Coordinator:  Mulholland Leads CENTCOM's Special-Operations Forces in the War on Terror.  Special Warfare 21:10-13 July-August 2008.
This is an interview with Major General John F. Mulholland Jr. who assumed command of Special Operations Command Central, or SOCCENT, June 22, 2007 thus leading CENTCOM's special-operations forces in the war on terror.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1521037391&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

de B. Taillon, J. Paul.  Coalition Special Operation Forces.  Military Technology 33, Special Issue:12-17 2009 ('Special Forces" issue).
"Coalition operations have become the crucial enabler for success in the Global War on Terrorism.  Over the past decade, successful operations have been conducted by coalition Special Operations Forces (CSOF) in Bosnia, Kosovo, Afghanistan, and Iraq, underlining the need to support, facilitate, and expedite future CSOF operations."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&AN=37247142&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Gates, Robert M.  SOF's Roles in Facing the Dangers of the 21st Century.  Military Technology 33, Special Issue:2-5 2009 ("Special Forces" issue).
"In a speech delivered at the Special Operations Forces International Conference in Tampa FL, Secretary Gates discusses what the government has learned from the "War on Terror" conflicts that can be applied to the wider struggle."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&AN=37247140&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Grdovic, Mark.  The Advisory Challenge.  Special Warfare 21:22-28 January-February 2008.
The intent of this article is to convey some of the critical aspects that enable advisers to be effective.  Many of these aspects are intangible, are often not required of leaders of U.S. forces, and are therefore relatively unfamiliar.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1416697141&sid=5&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Harrington, Caitlin.  NATO Discusses Creating Air Wing for Special Ops.  Jane's Defence Weekly 47:63 February 2010.

Hasler, Jeffrey L.  Defining War:  New Doctrinal Definitions of Irregular, Conventional and Unconventional Warfare.  Special Warfare 20:18-25 March-April 2007.
Explains that it is important for ARSOF to understand the emerging concept of irregular warfare (IW) and the place of traditional and maturing unconventional warfare (UW) within it.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1256751361&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Horowitz, Michael C. and Shalmon, Dan A.  The Future of War and American Military Strategy.  Orbis 53:300-318 March 2009.
"The military threats the United States is or will be most capable of defeating are the ones it is least likely to face, since potential adversaries will be deterred and seek other ways of confrontation.  However, with some smart and careful investments, including the recognition that not all parts of the military have to be optimized for the same task, the United States military can both lock in its conventional dominance and continue to improve its ability to succeed in the irregular wars most likely to dominate the landscape in the short to medium term."--Abstract.

Hotek, John A. and Manganaro, Christopher G.  Agile Sustainment:  A Practice in Agility.  Special Warfare 20:8-13 November-December 2007.
As the battlefield environment is constantly changing, logistics support provided to units engaged in counterinsurgency operations must remain fluid.  For a Special Forces battalion task force, which employs a small force structure, it is imperative that every aspect of logistics planning and operations be performed with attention to detail and ferocity of execution.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1386989471&sid=7&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Jean, Grace V.  'Lawrences of the World'.  National Defense 93:26-27 April 2009.
U.S. Special Operations Command officials are trying to model its troops after T. E. Lawrence, himself - an intelligence officer whose intimate familiarity of Arabic culture allowed him to build long-term relationships with key political and military figures in the Middle East.  Pilot programs and initiatives for reaching these goals are discussed.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1679998441&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Leibstone, Marvin.  Special Operations Forces & 21st Century Warfare.  Military Technology 33, Special Issue:29-33 2009 ("Special Forces" issue).
For most of their existence to date, U.S. and allied nation Special Operations Forces (SOF) have been perceived as, and treated as, sub-organizations inside the traditional loops of warfare.  Here, Leibstone delineates many planned SOF missions that contained usually high degree of risk and the lessons learned for SOF engagements.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1697692721&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Lamb, Christopher J. and Cinnamond Martin.  Unified Effort:  Key to Special Operations and Irregular Warfare.  Joint Force Quarterly No. 56:40-53 First Quarter 2010.

Olson Addresses SF Symposium.  Special Warfare 22:5-6 May-June 2009.
"Over the past several months, Gen Olsen has added three new tasks to the nine core tasks (direct action, unconventional warfare, special reconnaissance, foreign internal defense, civil affairs, psychological operations, information operations, counterterrorism and counterproliferation of weapons of mass destruction)."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1925701441&sid=4&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Robinson, Linda.  Inside the ’New’ Special Operations Forces.  U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings 135:28-33 July 2009.
To gain perspective on today's special operations forces, it is important to assess the changes they have undergone and what the consequences may be in the years ahead.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1899627271&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Spulak, Robert G.  A Theory of Special Operations:  The Origin, Qualities, and Use of SOF.  Military Technology 33, Special Issue:23-28 2009 ("Special Forces" issue).
A theory of special operations can be stated concisely:  special operations are missions to accomplish strategic objectives where the use of conventional forces would create unacceptable risks due to Clausewitzian friction.  Overcoming these risks requires special operations forces that directly address the ultimate sources of friction.
Also available online at:  http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=3&hid=13&sid=4c87555d-9faa-46bb-b18a-324d83b9a3fa%40sessionmgr12

Uhler, Dale G.  Technology Force Multiplier for Special Operations.  Military Technology 33, Special Issue:42-48  2009 ("Special Forces" issue).
"Here, Uhler discusses the technology developed by the US Special Operations Command (USSOCOM).  Providing current and future technology to the SOF warrior is the responsibility of the Special Operations Acquisition and Logistics Center of USSOCOM.  Within the center, the Advanced Technology Directorate currently manages four development programs:  technology development, special technology, advanced technology, and medical technology."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&AN=37247148&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv


Civil Affairs Operations (CA)


Internet Resources

Madden, Patrick and Dufour, Christopher P.  The Road to Peace, One Person at a Time:  Sister Cities International and Its Role in Persistent Conflict.  Washington, DC, February 10-12, 2009.
Available online at:  http://www.dtic.mil/ndia/2009SOLIC/DufourMaddenwhitepaper.pdf
20th Annual National Defense Industrial Association Special Operations/LIC Symposium & Exhibition, White Paper.

United States.  Department of the Air Force.  Air Force Doctrine Document 2-5.3:  Public Affairs (PA) Operations.  June 24, 2005.
Available online at:  http://www.e-publishing.af.mil/shared/media/epubs/AFDD2-5.3.pdf
Establishes doctrinal guidance for Public Affairs (PA) Operations.

United States.  Joint Chiefs of Staff.  Joint Publication 3-28:  Civil Support.  Washington DC, September 14, 2007.
Available online at:  http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/new_pubs/jp3_28.pdf
This publication provides overarching guidelines and principles to assist commanders and their staffs in planning and conducting joint civil support operations.

United States.  Joint Chiefs of Staff.  Joint Publication 3-57:  Civil-Military Operations.  Washington, DC, July 08, 2008.
Available online at:  http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/new_pubs/jp3_57.pdf
This publication provides joint doctrine for the planning and conduct of civil-military operations (CMO) by joint forces, the use of civil affairs forces, the conduct of civil affairs operations, and the coordination with other capabilities contributing to the execution of CMO to achieve unified action.  The role of SOF is mentioned throughout Chapter II.


Books

Bogart, Adrian T.  Block by Block:  Civic Action in the Battle of Baghdad, January-November 2006.  Hurlbert Field, FL, JSOU Press, 2007.  97 p.
Based on the recollections, notes, and reports of the author, who served with the Multi-National Division Baghdad (MND-B) as the G9 responsible for civic action, SOF integration and counterinsurgency training.  "In this timeframe MND-B treated civic action as a maneuver function inherent to its operations, and it employed task-organized combat forces to conduct phase IV (stability operations) and phase V (enable the civil authority) in order to achieve U.S.  and Iraqi military objectives."--Foreword.
Also available online at:  http://jsoupublic.socom.mil/publications/jsou/JSOU07-8bogartBlockByBlock_final.pdf
Book call no.:  956.70443 B674b

Celeski, Joseph D.  Policing and Law Enforcement in COIN:  The Thick Blue Line.  Hurlbert Field, FL, JSOU Press, February 2009.  95 p.
"This work on the role of policing in confronting security threats highlights the need to shift resources and emphasis towards policing, law enforcement, and internal security.  Law enforcement and internal security are key pillars in a comprehensive national security strategy and are often underemphasized."--Abstract.  As noted throughout this monograph, SOF plays a major role in the training, mentoring, and conduct of combined operations that build law enforcement effectiveness. --Introduction.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA495324
Book call no.:  355.0218 C392p

Judge Advocate General’s School (U.S. Army).  International and Operational Law Dept.  Operational Law Handbook.  Charlottesville, VA, International and Operational Law Dept., The Judge Advocate General’s School, 2009.  566 p.
Book call no.:  342.0412 O61


Documents (Student Research)

Bredenkamp, Brad.  Taking the Long View Towards the Long War:  Equipping General Purpose Force Leaders with Soft Power Tools for Irregular Warfare.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air War College, February 2009.  81 p.
Demands on the SOF community have necessitated the use of General Purpose Forces (GPF) for some missions that traditionally SOF has handled.  However, GPF do not have adequate training to assist with non-traditional missions..  This paper examines options for what training is desirable for the these GPF forces and proposes a solution.  Discussion includes mention of existing Special Operations Forces capabilities and existing SOF training resources.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43117 B831t

Kertis, Edward.  The Reconstruction Weapon Changing the Department of Defense Paradigm on Nationbuilding.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air War College, December 2007.  67 p.
Proposes a force reconstruction that would focus on SSTR and increase special forces, psyops, and civil affairs.  "U.S. Government agencies are currently incapable of accomplishing the reconstruction mission, therefore the Department of Defense should be the lead agency in stability, security, transition, and reconstruction (SSTR) operations.  The Department should:  transform the focus of the Quadrennial Defense Review; designate an Army major command as lead for SSTR operations; return civil affairs units to the regular Army; transform the Air Force to better match its SSTR missions; and formalize provincial reconstruction teams as regular units in all services."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  https://research.au.af.mil/papers/ay2007/awc/Kertis.pdf
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43117 K391r

Kusumoto, Dominic Y.  What Should USSOCOM’s Active Duty Civil Affairs Force Structure Look Like in the 21st Century?  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, April 2008.  56 p.
"This paper will answer the question whether or not civil affairs units from different services and training backgrounds can work in a joint interagency environment with a common lexicon of doctrinal terms, base line training expectations, and skills sets necessary to plan, execute or supervise tactical, operational and strategic civil military operation and activities in the 21st Century. …The common linkage between these groups is Civil Information Management and Common Core CA training.  Therefore, USSOCOM is not prepared to plan and execute strategic civil military/civil military activities in a joint operating environment."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  https://www.afresearch.org/
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 K971w


Periodicals

Bryant, Danford W.  Into Africa: CA Teams Expand Operation Enduring Freedom into Chad.  Special Warfare 21:18-25 September-October 2008.
"Because CA Soldiers conducting CME missions must be comfortable operating with a small team in foreign and austere environments and with little or no supervision or guidance, they should go through a physical and psychological assessment similar to that of other Soldiers currently being assessed and selected for Army SOF."--Abstract.
Also available online at: http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1564068181&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Dungan, C. Peter.  Fighting Lawfare:  At the Special Operations Task Force Level.  Special Warfare 21:9-15 March-April 2008.
The enemy uses lawfare as a means of abusing our legal system to tie up resources, shift momentum and sway world opinion to his cause.  For instance, detainees may make claims of abuse at the point of capture by indigenous forces, claim abuse again when transferred to an American detachment or team, and then claim abuse once again when they reach the detention facility of the special-operations task force.  U.S. forces are duty-bound to investigate all claims of detainee abuse so insurgents effectively burden leaders at three different levels of tactical command with detailed investigations.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1451838041&sid=4&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Finlayson, Kenneth.  A Collective Effort:  Army Special Operations Forces in Deh Rawod, Afghanistan.  Veritas 5, no. 4:43-55 2009.

Green, Dan.  Going Tribal:  Enlisting Afghanistan's Tribes.  Special Warfare 22:14-19 July-August 2009.
"Because many tribes lack a unifying leader, a key aspect of a tribalengagement strategy should be the convening of tribal security firgas (a meeting of village elders) throughout a province, primarily orchestrated by the Government of the Independent Republic of Afghanistan, or GIROA."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1925779301&sid=3&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Hill, John.  Blurring the Line:  Involving the Military in Humanitarian Affairs.  Jane's Intelligence Review 19:42-47 May 2007.
NATO operations in Afghanistan are integrating military and humanitarian operations as part of their strategy.

Keenan, Sean.  The Doctor Is In:  Task Force 31 Uses Host-Nation Medical Care to Support Its COIN Efforts.  Special Warfare 20:8-11 May-June 2007.
Task Force 31, composed of the 1st Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group, has implemented a comprehensive counterinsurgency plan during two rotations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan.  Task Force 31 uses host-nation medical care to support its COIN efforts.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1295280591&sid=8&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Lightsey, Ross F.  Civil Affairs Support to the Surge.  Special Warfare 21:16-23 March-April 2008.
The Civil Affairs forces from the U.S. Army Special Operations Command operate successfully with conventional forces in Iraq and provide numerous nonlethal options to an otherwise lethal operation.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1451838051&sid=4&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Searle, Thomas.  Tribal Engagement in Anbar Province:  The Critical Role of Special Operations ForcesJoint Force Quarterly No. 50:62-66 Third Quarter 2008.
"The program that convinced the Anbaris to support the coalition and the Iraqi national government was called tribal engagement, one of the most successful U.S. programs implemented in Iraq."--Article.  This article highlights the initial role of U.S. special operations forces (SOF) in the program.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA496431 (Scroll down to page 62).

Wells, Christopher B.  Breaking the Afghan Insurgency.  Special Warfare 20:20-29 September-October 2007.
Only operations that incorporate aspects of clearance, security and development within the context of a comprehensive counterinsurgency framework will have the lasting effect required to save Afghanistan.  Only truly integrated task forces that possess elements of military, diplomatic and political entities can properly execute those types of operations.  Also discusses the strategy of Task Force 31, composed of the 1st Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1345215031&sid=9&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Ziglar, Matthew T.  Connecting to the Populace:  CA Tackles People-Centric Operations.  Special Warfare 23:6-9 January-February 2010.
When examining the success demonstrated by CA in Afghanistan, it is no surprise that various leaders are calling for policy shifts.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1966404521&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD


Counterproliferation (CP)


Internet Resources

Arms Control Association
Available online at:  http://www.armscontrol.org/
An authoritative source on arms control which provides country resources, fact sheets, treaties and current news articles on various programs and policies concerning nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons.  Use the internal search engine to locate information relating to SOF.  A keyword under  "special operations" provides several items.

Krepinevich, Andrew F.  Meeting the Challenge of a Proliferated World.  The Wright Stuff April 2010.
Available online at:  http://www.au.af.mil/au/aunews/archive/2010/0508/0508Articles/CSBAKrepinevichApr10.pdf
The Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments provides an overview article on proliferation issues throughout the world.

Nuclear Control Institute
Available online at:  http://www.nci.org/nuketerror.htm
Provides links to background data on the nuclear terrorism threat.

Terrorism and WMD
Available online at:  http://www.fas.org/terrorism/wmd/index.html
A collection of resources on terrorist use of chemical, biological, nuclear, and radiological weapons, from their potential effects to possible responses to their use.  Quality links to articles on threat, preparedness, response, arms control and agroterrorism.  Good background information when researching counterproliferation and/or counterterrorist.

United States.  Department of the Air Force.  Air Force Doctrine Document 2-1.8:  Counter-Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Operations.  January 26, 2007.
Available online at:  http://www.e-publishing.af.mil/shared/media/epubs/AFDD2-1.8.pdf
This Air Force doctrine document details principles for conducting counter-chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear operations.  Special Operations Forces are referenced throughout the document.

United States.  Joint Chiefs of Staff.  Joint Publication 3-11:  Operations in Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) Environments.  Washington, DC, August 26, 2008.
Available online at:  http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/new_pubs/jp3_11.pdf
This publication provides doctrine to assist commanders and staffs in planning, preparing for, conducting, and assessing operations in which their forces may encounter chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear threats and hazards.  These principles apply across the range of military operations.  Special Operations Forces and core tasks are referenced throughout the document.

United States.  Joint Chiefs of Staff.  Joint Publication 3-40:  Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction.  Washington, DC, June 10, 2009.
Available online at:  http://www.fas.org/irp/doddir/dod/jp3_40.pdf
This publication provides fundamental principles and guidance for combating weapons of mass destruction (CWMD) and their means of delivery.  Special Operations Forces and core tasks are referenced throughout the document.


Books

Allen, Craig H.  Maritime Counterproliferation Operations and the Rule of Law.  Athens, GA, University of Georgia Press, 2009.  395 p.
"In this volume, experts in nonproliferation studies examine challenges faced by the international community and propose directions for national and international policy making and lawmaking."-- Book jacket.
Book call no.:  327.1747 C729

Avoiding the Abyss:  Progress, Shortfalls, and the Way Ahead in Combating the WMD Threat, edited by Barry R. Schneider and Jim A. Davis.  Westport, CT, Praeger Security International, 2006.  430 p.
Offers 13 essays on various aspects of the WMD Threat such as:  "Weapons of Mass Destruction Terrorism" and "Counter WMD Concepts of Operations at U.S. and Allied Bases".
Book call no.:  358.3 A961 2006

Carus, Seth W.  Defining "Weapons of Mass Destruction".  Washington, DC, National Defense University Press, 2006.  49 p.
Center for the Study of Weapons of Mass Destruction Occasional paper 4.  This paper explores the issue of defining weapons of mass destruction.  Depending on the definition adopted, the scope of the combating WMD  could change substantially.  Especially note "Selection Criteria for a DOD Definition" on pages 14 through 17.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA446692
Book call no.:  327.1745 C331d

Diehl, Sarah J. and Moltz, James Clay.  Nuclear Weapons and Nonproliferation:  A Reference Handbook.  Santa Barbara, CA, 2008.  335 p.
Book call no.:  355.825119 D559n 2008

Graham, Bob and others.  World at Risk:  The Report of the Commission on the Prevention of WMD Proliferation and Terrorism.  New York, Vintage Books, 2008.  132 p.
"The Commission believes that the U.S. government needs to move more aggressively to limit the proliferation of biological weapons and reduce the prospect of a bioterror attack.  Further compounding the nuclear threat is the proliferation of nuclear weapons capabilities to new states and the decision by several existing nuclear states to build up their arsenals.  Such proliferation is a concern in its own right because it may increase the prospect of military crises that could lead to war and catastrophic use of these weapons."--Abstract.
Book call no.:  363.32537 C734w


Documents (Student Research)

Baker, Bradford W.  The Role of the Geographic Combatant Commander in Counterproliferation of Nuclear Weapons.  Norfolk, VA, Joint Forces Staff College, Joint Advanced Warfighting School, April 2007.  88 p.
This paper:  1.) Reviews current and past doctrine on counterproliferation as well initiatives used to control the proliferation of nuclear weapons; 2.) Reviews the basic technology behind nuclear weapons and nuclear energy in order to define the difference between the two that can be used to improve existing doctrine; 3.) Reviews the three counterproliferation case studies, the former Soviet Union, the Middle East, and North Korea to demonstrate the differences that exist in different counterproliferation scenarios; 4.) Will then divide proliferation into three stages and discuss actions by Geographic Combatant Commanders in each stage to dissuade, deter, and if necessary, defeat counterproliferation in any scenario.  Additionally as part of this analysis, this paper will show how the role of United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) and associated doctrine for the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) can be applied as model for counterproliferation of nuclear weapons.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA468762
Doc. call no.: M-U 36185-37 B167r

Moyer, Kevin J.  Intelligence Sharing in Counterproliferation.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, September 2007.  89 p.
The premise of this thesis is that increased information sharing among allies causes more effective security cooperation and is therefore necessary for combating the spread of WMD.  Therefore, identifying and overcoming challenges that obstruct information sharing is imperative in preventing the spread of WMD.--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA474392
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42525 M9383i


Periodicals

Brill, Kenneth C.  Keys to Dealing with WMDs, Then and Now.  Vital Speeches of the Day 75:444-447 October2009.
"The article presents a speech by Kenneth C. Brill, the Director of the National Counterproliferation Center, delivered at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy in Washington D.C. on August 4, 2009.  Topics discussed in the speech included challenges associated with weapons of mass destruction (WMD), changes that Brill feels need to be made to the way governments react to WMD and biological weapons."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=44204915&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv


Counterterrorism (CT)


Internet Resources

Background Information on Foreign Terrorists Organizations
Available online at:  http://www.state.gov/www/global/terrorism/fto_info_1999.html
Offers a report with each group's aliases, description, activities, strength, location, etc., from the U.S. Dept of State's Office of Counterterrorism.

Center on Terrorism & Irregular Warfare.  Naval Postgraduate School,
Available online at:  http://www.nps.edu/Academics/Centers/CTIW/
A searchable site; includes reports and publications.

Fridovich, David P.  Combating Terrorist Financial Networks.  FDCH Congressional Testimony March 11, 2009.
Available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&AN=32Y2308587290&site=ehost-live
Statement of David P. Fridovich, Commander, Center for Special Operations U.S. Special Operations Command.

Jane's Terrorism and Insurgency Centre
Available online at:  http://jtic.janes.com/JDIC/JTIC/home.do
Provides information by region and individual country using the navigation bar on the left.  Be patient, it takes time to download the data.

Olson, Eric T.  Threat Posed by Al Qaida.  FDCH Congressional Testimony January 20, 2010.
Available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&AN=32Y4153681823&site=ehost-live
Report of Eric T. Olson, Commander U.S. Special Operations Command.

Special Operations Forces and Counterterrorism.  Strategic Comments 12, no.7:1-2 August 2006.
Available online at:  http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a768127539

Special Ops Commander Supports Strategy's Focus on Al-Qaida.  FDCH Regulatory Intelligence Database April 01, 2009.
Available online at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&AN=32W3331999070&site=ehost-live
Navy Adm. Eric T. Olson, commander of U.S. Special Operations Command, testified at a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on the Afghanistan-Pakistan strategy review.

Terrorism and the United States.  March 2010.
This Fairchild Center bibliography offers separate sections with information on "Counterinsurgency & Counterrorism" and "Homeland Security".
Available online at:  http://www.au.af.mil/au/aul/bibs/terrorism-US2010.htm

United States.  Joint Chiefs of Staff.  Joint Publication 3-26:  Counterterrorism.  Washington, DC, November 13, 2009.
Available online at:  http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/new_pubs/jp3_26.pdf
This publication provides joint doctrine for the planning and execution of counterterrorism across the range of military operations.


Books

Anderson, Wesley J. L.  Disrupting Threat Finances:  Using Financial Information to Disrupt Terrorist Organizations.  Hurlburt Field, FL, JSOU Press , 2007.  126 p.
"Major Anderson provides an excellent overview of terrorist financing and expands upon how it fits into the broader construct of threat financing.  He articulates the significant challenges any government faces in trying to interrupt the terrorist networks use of the global financial system."--JSOU web site.
DoD Policy and the Way Ahead, pp 38-44.  (Within the Department of Defense, the United States Special Operations Command has been designated the executive agent for synchronizing the GWOT, which includes disrupting and defeating threat finances).
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA495775
Book call no.:  363.3250681 A552d

Cassidy, Robert M.  Counterinsurgency and the Global War on Terror:  Military Culture and Irregular War.  Westport, CT, Praeger Security International, 2006.  211 p.
Book call no.:  355.021 Cas

Celeski, Joseph D.  Hunter-Killer Teams:  Attacking Enemy Safe Havens.  Hurlbert Field, FL, JSOU Press, 2010.  68 p.
"In this monograph, Colonel Joseph D. Celeski (U.S. Army, Ret.), argues that hunter-killer teams be routinely established as part of our standing Special Operations Forces (SOF)".--Foreword.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA514225
Book call no.:  363.320973 C392h

Finlan, Alastair.  Special Forces, Strategy and the War on Terror:  Warfare by Other Means.  New York, Routledge, 2008.  184 p.
This book provides chapters on SOF and its relationship to strategic/operational/tactical theory; "9/11 and Operation Enduring Freedom", and "Operation Iraqi Freedom and the future of Special Forces."
Book call no.:  363.325170973 F511s

Joint Special Operations University.  Special Operations Forces:  Interagency Counterterrorism Reference Manual.  Joint Special Operations University.  Hurlbert Field, FL, JSOU Press, March 2009.  102 p.
The volume was compiled to provide a valuable reference work for JSOU students, SOF staff officers, and partners in the interagency process.  The manual provides insight and information regarding various counterterrorism players in the U.S. Government national security apparatus.  While not all inclusive, this manual provides an outline of organizations, missions, and relationships that comprise the interagency process."--Publisher web site.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA514574
Book call no.:  363.32517 S741


Documents (Student Research)

Farris, Stuart L.  Joint Special Operations Task Force-Philippines:  A Monograph.  Fort Leavenworth, KS, School of Advanced Military Studies, Army Command and General Staff College, 2009.  65 p.
"The Joint Special Operations Task Force-Philippines (JSOTF-P) indirect approach to irregular warfare (IW) offers senior U.S. policy makers and military commanders a suitable model worthy of consideration for conducting long-term military operations against terrorist networks inside a partner nation’s sovereign territory. --Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA505075
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022-2 F2461j

Gavle, Kathleen A.  A Case for Collaboration in Countering Terror.  Carlisle Barracks, PA, U.S. Army War College, 2009. 26 p.
Paper states that the most important tool for preventing terrorists attacks is intelligence.  The paper provides three case studies to highlight the effectiveness of blending law enforcement and military intelligence capabilities to counter terrorism.  These case studies are drawn from Special Operations Forces operations including Joint Task Force North; Special Operations; 1st Brigade which is the USNORTHCOM organization tasked with providing DOD support to federal law enforcement agencies to identify and interdict transnational threat along the approaches to the United States homeland
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA498549

Newell, Thomas, Jr.  The Use of Special Operations Forces in Combating Terrorist Financing.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2006.  41 p.
"USSOCOM must look at means other than direct action to defeat these terrorist networks.  It must look at the entire network and not just the cells that carry out the terrorist operations.  Terrorist financing is an integral part of the GWOT, though thus far it has mostly been pursued by law enforcement agencies rather than the U.S. Military."--Abstract taken from web site.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA457538
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42525 N547u


Periodicals

Coburn, Matthew D.  GWOT 2.0:  Capitalizing on Experience Gained.  Special Warfare 20:23-28 November-December 2007.
Should the U.S. government choose to return special operations forces to the forefront in planning, leading and performing GWOT operations, ARSOF stand more prepared than ever to provide incredible effects for their nation?
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1386989491&sid=2&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Desert Menace.  Economist 395, no.8682:52-53 May 15, 2010.
This article discusses terrorism and Al-Qaeda in west Africa.  "OPERATION Flintlock has begun.  American special forces have been descending on Burkina Faso, Mali, Mauritania and Senegal in a joint exercise, expected to last another week or so, to combat Islamist terrorism in the region.  It is the latest stage of an evolving partnership between America and much of west Africa."--Article.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=50561307&site=ehost-live

Gates, Robert M.  SOF's Roles in Facing the Dangers of the 21st Century.  Military Technology 33, Special Issue:2-5 2009 ("Special Forces" issue).
"Special Operations Forces (SOF) are playing an outsized - indeed, central - role in the "War on Terror".  That conflict has relied on, and will continue to rely on, the skill of our nation's special operators for years to come".--Article.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&AN=37247140&site=ehost-live&custid=airuniv

Hammes, T. X.  How Will We Fight?  Orbis 53:365-383 June 2009.
This article begins by examining the threats we face from conventional, insurgent, and hybrid enemies as well as terrorists.  It outlines how the U.S. can fight effectively against each threat, identifies the deficiencies in our current force structure, and provides recommendations for each of the services and special operations forces.

Robinson, Linda.  Inside the ’New’ Special Operations Forces.  U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings 135:28-33 July 2009.
To gain perspective on today's special operations forces, it is important to assess the changes they have undergone and what the consequences may be in the years ahead. The role of counterterrorism is mentioned throughout the article.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1899627271&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD


 

Direct Action (DA)


Internet Resources (Student Research)

Muse, Robert C.  Advising Foreign Forces:  Force Structure Implications of the Indirect Approach to Irregular Warfare.  Quantico, VA, Marine Corps Command and Staff College, 2008.  30 p.
Available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA491120
"The US Military has historically crafted ad-hoc solutions to the recurring problem of advising foreign military forces.  The United States government must undertake a serious effort to craft a long term plan to address need for foreign military advisory capability."--Abstract.


Books

Neville, Leigh.  Special Operations Forces in Iraq.  New York, Osprey Publishing, 2008.  64 p.
Book call no.:  956.704434 N524s

Rosenau, William.  Special Operations Forces and Elusive Enemy Ground Targets:  Lessons from Vietnam and the Persian Gulf War.  Santa Monica, CA, RAND, 2001.  60 p.
Explores the role of ground observers in efforts to detect and defeat elusive forces.  Provides separate chapters on:  "U.S. air ground operations against the Ho Chi Minh Trail", "Coalition Scud-hunting in Iraq, 1991", and "Conclusions and Implications for Future Operations".
Also available online at:  http://www.rand.org/publications/MR/MR1408
Book call no.:  355.422 R813s


Document (Student Research)

McGuire, Michael J.  Modeling the Effects of Direct Action Operations on an Insurgent Population.  Newport, RI, Naval War College, May 2008.  47 p.
Examines the impacts of direct action operations on the population in the struggle to gain their support and foster legitimacy of the government.  "The study identifies three parameters within the control of the operational commander.  The commander can devote assets to develop intelligence to provide a sufficient level of fidelity to prevent adverse actions.  The commander can establish a suitable threshold for operations.  The commander can adjust his assets to raise or lower his capacity to develop and execute the direct action component of his operational concept."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA484415
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41662 M148m


Foreign Internal Defense (FID)


Internet Resources

Brinkerhoff, Derick W. and others.  Guide to Rebuilding Governance in Stability Operations:  A Role for the Military?  Carlisle Barracks, PA, Strategic Studies Institute.  Army War College, June 2009.  77 p.
Available online at: http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=925
"This guide focuses on the military’s role in rebuilding and establishing a functional, effective, and legitimate nation-state; .... provides a comprehensive approach to planning and implementing a program to rebuild governance by U.S. peacekeeping forces during stability operations."--Abstract.

Jones, D.  Ending the Debate:  Unconventional Warfare, Foreign Internal Defense, and Why Words Matter.  Leavenworth, KS, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, June 2006.  208 p.
Available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA451259
"There is an ongoing debate within the Special Forces community whether unconventional warfare and foreign internal defense are applicable in the contemporary and future Special Operations environments, based on current doctrinal definitions and operational concepts."--Abstract.

United States.  Department of the Air Force.  Air Force Doctrine Document 2-3.1; Foreign Internal Defense.  September 15, 2007.
Available online at:  http://www.e-publishing.af.mil/shared/media/epubs/AFDD2-3.1.pdf
This document articulates fundamental Air Force roles for FID and advises commanders how to employ and integrate Air Force resources to achieve US objectives through FID operations.  "Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) is tasked with maintaining forces that are specifically organized, trained, and equipped to conduct FID missions."... "Although Air Force forces can perform FID across the range of military operations, the main form of FID support consists of assessing, training, advising, and assisting foreign aviation forces"--AFDD 2-3.1.

United States.  Joint Chiefs of Staff.  Joint Publication 3-07.1; Joint Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Foreign Internal Defense (FID).  Washington, DC, April 30, 2004.
Available online at:  http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/new_pubs/jp3_07_1.pdf
This publication establishes joint tactics, techniques, and procedures (JTTP) for the Armed Forces of the United States involved in or supporting foreign internal defense operations.  Special Operations Forces and structure within FID are mentioned throughout the publication.


Books

Hashim, Ahmed.  Insurgency and Counter-Insurgency in Iraq.  Ithaca, NY, Cornell University Press, 2006.  482 p.
"The US Military's Approach to Counter-Insurgency", pp 319-344.  This chapter provides solid background to the internal problems in Iraq, U.S. military efforts there, and the current results.  Although not specifically mentioned, special operations forces are involved in most areas discussed.
Book call no.:  956.7044342 H348i

Mockaitis, Thomas R.  Iraq and the Challenge of Counterinsurgency.  Westport, CT, Praeger Security International, 2008.  189 p.
"The Army’s new doctrine, embodied in FM 3-24 Counterinsurgency, outlines the correct approach to winning Iraq.   However, three years of desultory conflict amid ongoing revelations that the premises upon which the administration argued the need for invading Iraq may be false have eroded support for the war.  The American armed forces may soon find themselves in the unfortunate situation of having found a formula for success at almost the same time the voters demand withdrawal."--Book Jacket.
Book call no.:  956.704434 M688i


Documents (Student Research)

Gentile, Lee G.  Persistent Airpower for Unconventional Warfare:  Revamping AFCENT’s Operational Design.  Newport, RI, Naval War College, May 2009.  21 p.
"AFCENT (U.S. Air Forces Central) should adopt an unconventional operational design to provide ground forces with persistent airpower during stability operations while preparing a host nation’s air force to assume control of air defense."--Abstract.  Discusses aviation FID and mentions the 6th Special Operations Squadron (6 SOS) which is DOD’s only organization that trains foreign countries how to use airpower for UW operations.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA502979
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41662 G338p

Grundahl, Scott A.  Standing Up the Iraqi Air Force:  Bridging the Gap Between Foreign Internal Defense and Starting from Scratch.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2008.  42 p.
"After thorough evaluation, the best short-term solution for large-scale Foreign Internal Defense is one led by special operations trained advisors, augmented by general purpose forces, and accomplishes the least basic skills training in combat possible. This is only an intermediate solution, and long-term solutions require a large standing advisory force."
Also available online at:  https://www.afresearch.org/skins/rims/display.aspx?moduleid=be0e99f3-fc56-4ccb-8dfe-670c0822a153&mode=user&action=downloadpaper&objectid=b1b0ebb8-540a-4817-a4a2-d71d7af89f97&rs=PublishedSearch
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 G889s

James, Jeffery N.  Understanding Contemporary Foreign Internal Defense and Military Advisement:  Not Just a Semantic Exercise:  A Monograph.  Fort Leavenworth, KS, School of Advanced Military Studies, Army Command and General Staff College, 2008.  40 p.
"This monograph examines the effects of changes in the current operating environment and current operations in Iraq on the application of Foreign Internal Defense (FID) operations conducted by Special Operations Forces (SOF)."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA485599
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022-2 J271u

Matelski, Thomas R.  Developing Security Force Assistance:  Lessons from Foreign Internal Defense:  A Monograph.  Fort Leavenworth, KS, School of Advanced Military Studies, Army Command and General Staff College, 2008.  51 p.
This paper discusses SOFs experience in Vietnam, Colombia, and contemporary operations and finds common threads from FID that SFA can take forward as it develops.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA495486
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022-2 M425d

Wilson, Robert L.  SOF Contributions to Strengthening Weak or Failing States:  A Monograph.  Fort Leavenworth, KS, School of Advanced Military Studies, Army Command and General Staff College, 2005.  53 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA436306
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022-2 W752s


Periodicals

Burton, Janice.  Training Our Allies:  New Course Provides Better Training for Coalition SOF.  Special Warfare 19:23-25 January-February 2006.
Also available online at: http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=991065071&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Coburn, Matthew D.  It Takes a Village to Counter an Insurgency.  Special Warfare 20:8-13 July-August 2007.
Explains the concept of adopting a village focused plan to counter insurgency in Afghanistan.  Scroll down to article.
Also available online at:  http://www.soc.mil/swcs/swmag/Assets/07Jul.pdf

Flanagan, Stephen.  Effective Use of FID Expands SF Influences.  Special Warfare 23:19-25 March-April 2010.
Not posted on line at time of this publication.

Lubold, Gordon.  African Allies:  U.S. Anti-Terror Trainers Make Inroads in Troubled Region.  Armed Forces Journal 143:22-26 September 2005.

Mulbury, John.  ARSOF:  General Purpose Forces and FID:  Who Does What, Where and When?  Special Warfare 21:16-21 January-February 2008.
FID is an ARSOF core task that has been the topic of much interest and debate lately, as we increasingly emphasize the "indirect approach.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1416697171&sid=5&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

O'Hara, Patrick M.  The Carrot and the Stick:  Can It Still Work?  Special Warfare 20:30-35 September 2007.
Multiple small-unit operations at various locations (vs. one massive attack) will allow the tactical unit to secure the populace and maintain constant pressure on the insurgents but will also lessen the amount of collateral damage.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1345215041&sid=9&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Petit, Brian.  OEF-PHILIPPINES:  Thinking COIN, Practicing FID.  Special Warfare 23:10-16 January-February 2010.
[...] U.S. forces would be prohibited from direct combat roles or direct engagements with enemy forces.  The population knew that JTF Comet was interested not only in destroying ASG/JI elements but also in providing needed infrastructure and development assistance to the people of the SuIu Archipelago.  Because of this, the inhabitants reached out to JTF Comet forces even before ASG/ JI made their presence known on Pangutaran."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1966404501&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Tanabe, Daniel A. and Orenstein, Joseph N.  Integrating the Rule of Law with FID in Iraq.  Special Warfare 22:7-11 November-December 2009.
"In late 2007, the group operations officer and deputy operations officer realized that many of the detainees captured through combined operations by U.S. special-operations forces, or SOF, and their partnered Iraqi FID force were either being released or were pending release from the custody of coalition forces. [...] through a functional approach rather than a paradigm approach, the 5SFG-FWD, using the rocket docket, was able to develop a methodology for targeting and sustaining capacity in its partnered FID units that was nested within Iraqi criminal-procedures law."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1935997721&sid=2&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Tovo, Ken.  From the Ashes of the Phoenix:  Lessons for Contemporary Counterinsurgency Operations.  Special Warfare 20:6-15 January-February 2007.
This article provides a review of the insurgency tactics used during the Vietnamese Conflict including the Phoenix Program and then relates those lessons learned to the current problems with operations against militant Islamic insurgency in the Middle East.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1221371071&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD


Information (IO)


Internet Resources

Air War College.  Cyberspace and Information Operations Study Center
Available online at:  http://www.au.af.mil/info-ops/
The Cyberspace and Information Operations Study Center was established at the Air War College in 2005 to contribute to the USAF and Joint Cyberspace and Info-Ops communities strategic and operational understanding and application of 21st century Information Age operations.

DIME:  Information as Power
Available online at:  http://www.carlisle.army.mil/dime/information_operations.cfm#nogo
This site has numerous periodicals and reference links on information operations.

Information As Power.  Center for Strategic Leadership, U.S. Army War College,
Available online at:  http://www.csl.army.mil/InfoAsPower.aspx
The Information in Warfare Working Group (I2WG) of the U.S. Army War College (USAWC) presents this anthology of selected student work from Academic Year 2010 on the vital subject of Information as Power.--Abstract.  Also has links to Volumes 1-3; Academic Years 2006-2009.

Information Operations.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Muir S. Fairchild Research Information Center, 2010. 37 p.
This Fairchild Center bibliography offers additional information on Information Operations in general and separate sections on Influence Operations, Network Warfare Operations and Electronic Warfare Operations.
Available online at:  http://www.au.af.mil/au/aul/bibs/infoops2010.htm

Perry, William G.  Information Warfare:  Assuring Digital Intelligence Collection.  Hurlbert Field, FL, JSOU Press, July 2009.  48 p.
Available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA514505
"Provides guidelines about processing computer equipment for transfer to information and intelligence professionals who might wring out from digital storage media the critical information needed to penetrate the enemy’s decision matrix.  In addition, captured computer gear may often need to be protected by a chain of custody in order to support legal actions against illegal combatants-criminals."... "Today's Special Operations Forces (SOF) are most likely to confront these opponents while on counterinsurgency, foreign internal defense, and counterterrorism missions".--Abstract and Article.

Rosin, Randolph.  Small Wars Journal:  To Kill a Mockingbird -- The Deconstruction of Information Operations.  2009.
Available online at:  http://www.carlisle.army.mil/DIME/documents/The%20Deconstruction%20of%20Information%20Operations%20-%20Rosin.pdf
This article discusses the U.S. Army's new Information Operations doctrine including its relationship and impact on Army Psychological Operations, Civil-Military Operations, etc.

Secretary of the Air Force.  Air Force Manual 37-104:  Managing Information to Support the Air Force Mission.  June 1995.
Available online at:  http://www.e-publishing.af.mil/shared/media/epubs//AFMAN37-104.pdf
Newest document that's available and it replaced AFR 4-1, December 30, 1988.

United States.  Department of the Air Force.  Air Force Doctrine Document 2-5; Information Operations.  January 11, 2005.
Available online at:  http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/service_pubs/afdd2_5.pdf
Establishes doctrinal guidance for information operations (IO).

United States.  Joint Chiefs of Staff.  Joint Publication 3-13; Information Operations.  Washington, DC, February 13, 2006.
Available online at:  http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/new_pubs/jp3_13.pdf
Publications provide doctrine for information operations planning, preparation, execution, and assessment in support of joint operations.  Special Operations Forces are mentioned throughout the publication.


Internet Resources (Student Research)

Murray, Dennis M.  Talking the Talk:  Why Warfighters Don't Understand Information Operations.  Carlisle Barracks, PA, Center for Strategic Leadership, May 2009.  5 p.
Available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA509024
"A review of current military and U.S. government information-related lexicon and definitions points out a very obvious flaw:  this stuff is confusing? and in some cases, self-defeating."--Abstract.


Books

Ideas as Weapons:  Influence and Perception in Modern Warfare, edited by G. J. David and T. R. McKeldin.  Washington, DC, Potomac Books, 2009.  458 p.
This anthology offers 43 essays by various authors most of whom are military officers.  Work is divided into four sections:  geopolitical, operational, strategic, and tactical.  Includes essays such as  "Army IO Is PSYOPS:  Influencing More with Less" and "Winning in the Pacific:  The Special Operations Forces’ Indirect Approach".
Book call no.:  355.343 I19

Collings, Deirdre and Rohozinski, Rafal.  Bullets and Blogs:  New Media and the Warfighter:  An Analytical Synthesis and Workshop Report.  Carlisle, PA, Center for Strategic Leadership, U.S. Army War College, 2009.  97 p.
The U.S. Army War College hosted a workshop in January 2008 which used case studies from the 2006 Israel-Hezbollah War in Lebanon.  This conflict marked an important milestone since the non-state actor, Hezbollah, used information to thwart Israel’s primary war aims and forced a battlefield stalemate.  Note "Box 5:  Operation Valhalla: U.S. Special Forces Neutralized for a Month by Cell Phones" on pp 22-23 and "Countering Adversary Propaganda" on pp 43-45.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA508195
Book call no.:  355.343 C711b

Dauber, Cori Elizabeth.  YouTube War:  Fighting in a World of Cameras in Every Cell Phone and Photoshop on Every Computer.  Carlisle, PA, Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College, November 2009.  123 p.
This monograph lays out this new environment in terms of its implications for a war against media-savvy insurgents, and then considers possible courses of action for the Army and the U.S. military as they seek to respond to an enemy that has proven enormously adaptive to this new environment and the new type of warfare it enables.  Quotes from various Special Operations Forces officers and leaders are used throughout the report.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA510207
Book call no.:  303.625 D235y

Libicki, Martin C. and others.  Byting Back:  Regaining Information Superiority Against 21st-Century Insurgents.  Santa Monica, CA, RAND Corporation, 2007.  159 p.
The Principles of ICON, pp 105-130.  This chapter discusses the information system used by U.S. warfighters in Mosul in 2004 to illustrate ICON principles.
Also available online at:  http://www.rand.org/pubs/monographs/2007/RAND_MG595.1.pdf.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA472417
Book call no.:  355.0218 B998

MacDonald, Scot.  Propaganda and Information Warfare in the Twenty-First Century:  Altered Images and Deception Operations.  New York, Routledge, 2007.  204 p.
Analyzes how the technology to alter images and rapidly distribute them can be used for propaganda and deception operations.  Such images have already appeared, including altered images of British troops abusing prisoners in Iraq.  Using examples from history, Scot Macdonald outlines the principles of propaganda and deception, and presents a history of the use of altered images (both still and moving) in politics, diplomacy, espionage and war."--Book Jacket.
Book call no.:  355.3434 M135p

Paul, Christopher.  Information Operations:  Doctrine and Practice:  A Reference Handbook.  Westport, CT, Praeger Publishers, 2008.  175 p.
"A no-nonsense treatment of information operations, this handbook makes clear what does and does not fall under information operations, how the military plans and executes such efforts, and what the role of IO ought to be in the 'war of ideas.'  Paul provides detailed accounts of the doctrine and practice of the five core IO capabilities and the three "related" capabilities".--Book Jacket.
Book call no.:  355.34340973 P324i

Rid, Thomas and Hecker, Marc.  War 2.0:  Irregular Warfare in the Information Age.  Westport, CT, Praeger Security International, 2009.  280 p.
Book call no.:  355.02 R542w


Documents

U.S. Army War College.  Department of Military Strategy, Planning and Operations.  Information Operations Primer:  Fundamentals of Information Operations.  Carlisle Barracks, PA, U.S. Army War College, 2009.  197 p.
"Information Operations seek to influence the behavior of target decision-makers while simultaneously defending friendly decision-makers from being influenced by an adversary's use of information."--Abstract.  Offers copies of various DoD Directives, along with the structure of various commands and agencies involved in IO.  Note the "U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM)" on pages 99-102.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA514489
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39080-643a

Zhansan, Ke.  Study in Guiding Ideology of Information Operations in Joint Campaigns.  Charlottesville, VA, Department of the Army, National Ground Intelligence Center, 2005.  11 p.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 44152-7 2003 no. 01053


Documents (Student Research)

Benoit, Marcel L.  The Special Operations:  Cyberspace Nexus.  Maxwell AFB, AL, School of Advanced Air and Space Studies, 2008
"This thesis addresses the emerging need to target both the infrastructure and human elements of networks through cyberspace and special operations forces (SOF) acting in concert.  Historical examples abound that show how coherent SOF-cyberspace efforts can significantly contribute to the moral and material attrition of the enemy."--Abstract.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43998-1 B473s

Cothrel, Timothy J.  Air Force Public Affairs:  Operating Under the Influence.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air War College, 2007.  39 p.
"Air Force information operations doctrine includes public affairs among the various components of influence operations, which is one of the three major elements of information operations.  In contrast, joint doctrine segregates public affairs and information operations, with the former serving as a related capability to the latter.  .... the Air Force approach poses a risk to the effectiveness of public affairs programs and activities, and may ultimately undermine the fundamental principle of civilian control of the military."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  https://research.au.af.mil/papers/ay2007/awc/Cothrel.pdf
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43117 C843a


Periodicals

Batschelet, Allen W.  Information Operations for the Joint Warfighter.  Field Artillery, pp 8-10, July-August 2004.
Also available online at:  http://sill-www.army.mil/FAMAG/2004/JUL_AUG_2004/Pages8-10.pdf

Bloom, Bradley.  Information Operations in Support of Special Operations.  Military Review 84:45-49 January-February 2004.
"Bloom stresses that the changing role of the Special Operations Command has increased the need for improved, comprehensive information operations (IO) support to special operations.  At the strategic level, IO can facilitate and enhance special operations across the operational spectrum."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=623915561&sid=1&Fmt=4&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Emery, Norman E.  Irregular Warfare Information Operations:  Understanding the Role of People, Capabilities, and Effects.  Military Review 88:27-38 November-December 2008.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=36065632&site=ehost-live

Wass de Czege, Huba.  Rethinking IO:  Complex Operations in the Information Age.  Military Review 88:14-27 November-December 2008.
"Addresses expected questions like 'How can we better achieve information superiority and enhanced information effects?', 'What are the 'best practices' in the field?', and 'What is the best way to integrate core IO capabilities?' reveal inherent flaws in understanding how IO fits in a comprehensive theory of war."--Abstract.  Special Operations Forces are mentioned throughout the article.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1607951011&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD


Psychological Operations (PSYOP)


Internet Resources (Student Research)

Baker, Prentiss O.  Psychological Operations Within the Cyberspace Domain.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air War College, February 2010.  28 p.
Available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA519576

Berry, Mark S.  PSYOP and the Information Age:  Assessing US Army Employment of Psychological Operations in the Contemporary Operating Environment.  Fort Leavenworth KS, School of Advanced Military Studies, Army Command and General Staff College, May 2009.  63 p.
Available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA506586

Main, F. Scott.  Psychological Operations Support to Strategic Communications in Afghanistan.  Carlisle Barracks, PA, Army War College, March 2009.  28 p.
Available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA497711

Thomas, Joel W., II.  Special Forces and the Art of Influence:  A Grassroots Approach to Psychological Operations in an Unconventional Warfare Environment.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2006.  81 p.
Available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA457667

United States.  Joint Chiefs of Staff.  , 07 January 2010 Joint Publication 3-13.2:  Psychological Operations.  Washington, DC, January 7, 2010.
Available online at:  http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/new_pubs/jp3_13_2.pdf
This publication provides the overarching doctrinal guidance for the conduct of psychological operations across the range of military operations.  Especially note, Psychological Operations and Special Operations Activities, pp VI-2 through VI-4.


Books

Boyd, Curtis D.  Psychological Operations:  Learning Is not a Defense Science Project.  Hurlburt Field, FL, JSOU Press, 2007.  34 p.
"This paper discusses the interaction between the PSYOP, Public Affairs, and information operations communities and offers insight into a way forward to better utilize PSYOP, especially within the U.S. Army.."--Foreword.  Various aspects of Special Operations Forces are mentioned throughout the report.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA495550
Book call no.:  355.3434 B789p

Ideas as Weapons:  Influence and Perception in Modern Warfare, edited by G. J. David and T. R. McKeldin.  Washington, DC, Potomac Books, 2009.  458 p.
This anthology offers 43 essays by various authors most of whom are military officers.  Work is divided into four sections:  geopolitical, operational, strategic, and tactical.  Includes essays such as  "Army IO Is PSYOPS:  Influencing More with Less" and "Reflections on Psychological Operations:  The Imperative of Engaging a Conflicted Population".
Book call no.:  355.343 I19

Kodosky, Robert J.  Psychological Operations American Style:  The Joint United States Public Affairs Office, Vietnam and Beyond.  New York, Lexington Books, 2007.  225 p.
"Psychological Operations American Style examines the historical use of PSYOP by the United States in the twentieth century.  Over six years into its War on Terror, and more than thirty years removed from the Vietnam War, the United States continues to cling to its traditional style of PSYOP."--Book Jacket.
Book call no.:  355.34340973 K76p


Document (Student Research)

Reck, Gregory J. and others.  Modernizing Psychological Operations.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, 2007.  105 p.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42525 R298m


Periodicals

Bartram, Marty.  Psychological Operations and the Principles of War.  Special Warfare 22:11-13 July -August 2009.
"Joint doctrine adds three other principles, and taken together, they make up the 12 principles of joint operations, which characterize the conduct of operations at the strategic, operational and tactical levels.  PSYOP units and staff elements coordinate with supporting logistics and intelligence elements to assure that those critical enablers provide required support so that PSYOP programs can be flexible in development and execution."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1925779291&sid=3&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Card, Jesse W.  Delivering the Message.  Special Warfare 21:26-29 July-August 2008.
"PSYOP use of video compact discs, or VCDs, began early in the Iraq campaign (2003).  As the local populace increasingly had access to computers and DVD players, VCDs became an important means to reach target audiences and disseminate PSYOP messages.  The use of this media continued in successive rotations.  This article provides guidance on how to employ this medium for disseminating PSYOP messages."--Editor's note.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1521037301&sid=1&Fmt=6&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Courter, Ian.  Religious Factors Analysis:  A New Emphasis and a New Approach.  Special Warfare 20:25-30 January-February 2007.
"A review of lessons learned during Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom by the Special Warfare Center and School's Directorate of Training and Doctrine's SF, CA and PSYOP doctrine developers and the SWCS chaplain has concluded that the ARSOF doctrinal templates for analyzing the degree to which religion influences a specific society lack the depth and articulation necessary for developing a thorough understanding of the operational environment."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1221371081&sid=4&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Cracking the Code on Measures of Effectiveness:  The Alfred H. Paddock Psychological Operations Essay Contest.  Special Warfare 22:8-13 September-October 2009.
The annual essay contest was open to any service member or civilian in the special-operations community.  This article provides the three winning essays.
1st place - Back to Basics:  Returning to PSYOP Doctrine to Solve the 'MOE Riddle', by Sergeant Christopher E. Howard.
2nd place - Measuring Psychological Operations:  It's All about the SPO, by Captain Gregory S. Seese.
3rd place - Measuring the Effectiveness of Psychological Operations In Support of Irregular Warfare, by Sergeant First Class Mervyn E. Roberts, Ill.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1926316021&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Magnuson, Stew.  Soft Power:  U.S. Special Forces Target Hearts and MindsNational Defense 92:42-26 February 2008.
The article focuses on an information campaign designed by a U.S. special forces military information support team, also known as psychological operations.  According to U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates, the use of soft power to achieve U.S. objectives is one of the most important lessons learned from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&AN=31537005&site=ehost-live

Rohm, Fredric W., Jr.  Merging Information Operations and Psychological Operations.  Military Review 88:108-111 January-February 2008.
The author proposes merging the 10 functional areas (FA) and the Psychological Operations (PSYOP) branch into one specialty under the umbrella term "information operations."  Combining resources, training, and functions can only help the overall DOD effort in the information war.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1421827631&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Yarborough, William P.  A Historical View of the Psychological Role of Special Forces.  Special Warfare 20:12-14 September-October 2007.
"This article was written in 1972 and was published in DA Pamphlet 525-7-2 in 1976.  Yarborough, who died in December 2005, is credited as being one of the founders of Special Forces."--Editor's note.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1345215011&sid=9&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD


Special Reconnaissance (SR)


Internet Resources

Libbey, Miles and Harris, Robinson.  Special Reconnaissance/Unconventional Warfare---How about an UxV for a Teamate?  Washington, DC, February 10-12, 2009.
Available online at:  http://www.dtic.mil/ndia/2009SOLIC/LibbeyHarriswhitepaper.pdf
20th Annual National Defense Industrial Association Special Operations/Low Intensity Conflict Symposium & Exhibition, White Paper.

Warner, Norman and others.  Special Operations Reconnaissance (SOR) Scenario:  Intelligence Analysis and Mission Planning.  Patuxent River, MD, Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, April 2008.  82 p.
Available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA483249

United Stated.  Joint Chiefs of Staff.  Joint Publication 3-05.1:  Joint Special Operations Task Force Operations.  Washington, DC, April 2007.  1 vol.
Available online at:  http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/new_pubs/jp3_05_1.pdf#search="special"
This publication refers to special reconnaissance throughout the publication.  Especially note, Appendix G - Annex A Special Operations Intelligence Requirements:  Direct Action and Special Reconnaissance Missions, pp G-A1 through G-A14.

United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM):  Special Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Exploitation.
Section of the official USSOCOM website.
Available online at:  http://www.socom.mil/soal/Pages/SpecialReconnaissanceSurveillanceandExploitation.aspx


Internet Resources (Student Research)

Tougaw, Ronald.  Improving Collaboration Between Air Force Human Intelligence and Counterintelligence.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College Air University, April 2009.  29 p.
Available online at:  https://www.afresearch.org/
This paper assesses the relationship between HUMINT and CI and offers a proposed organizational solution to ensure the Air Force optimizes its capabilities for both.


Books

Berntsen, Gary.  Human Intelligence, Counterterrorism, & National Leadership:  A Practical Guide.  Washington, DC, Potomac Books, 2008.  136 p.
"Human Intelligence, Counterterrorism, and National Leadership will be of interest to legislators, policymakers, and anyone concerned about intelligence and terrorism policy."--Book Jacket.
Book call no.:  327.1273 B531h

Ghashghai, Elham.  Communications Networks to Support Integrated Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Strike Operations.  Santa Monica, CA, RAND, 2004.  35 p.
"A combination of options, which will vary depending on altitude, range, data rate, and threat, will be needed to ensure a robust communications link.  Although communications does not appear to be a limiting factor for future ISR forces, programmatic action will be required to develop the necessary systems and the costs could be high."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA429787
Book call no.:  355.33041 G411c

Rosenau, William.  Special Operations Forces and Elusive Enemy Ground Targets:  Lessons from Vietnam and the Persian Gulf War.  Santa Monica, CA, RAND, 2001.  60 p.
"Coalition Scud-Hunting in Iraq, 1991:  Missions of Special Operations Forces, pp 34-39.
Also available online at:  http://www.rand.org/publications/MR/MR1408
Book call no.:  355.422 R813s

United States.  Department of the Air Force.  Air Force Roadmap:  2006-2025.  Washington, DC, U.S. Air Force, 2006.  159 p.
Specialized Air Power:  Key to Irregular Operations and the War on Terror, pp 106-128.
Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) and Air Combat Command provide Air Force specialized airpower.  This chapter provides information on AFSOC strike and special reconnaissance capabilities and the ISR operations structure and equipment.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA471948
Book call no.:  358.4130973 U58a


Documents (Student Research)

Hogan, Todd C.  The Persistent Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Dilemma:  Can the Department of Defense Achieve Information Superiority?  Fort Leavenworth, KS, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, 2007.  79 p.
"Persistent ISR is the ability to do this with sufficient timeliness and precision to achieve the Joint Force Commander’s (JFC) objectives.  The Global War on Terror’s (GWOT) multitude of threats demands an ISR capability with the persistence to find, fix, and track single individuals in a crowd; locate camouflaged, concealed, or mobile weapons of mass destruction (WMDs); and monitor any area on the globe sufficiently enough that meaningful changes can be detected and correctly interpreted in near-real-time."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA471464
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022 H714r

Jackson, Mathew J.  Swimming with the Natives:  Cultural Immersion and Its Applications to Naval Special Warfare.  Monterey, CA naval Postgraduate School, September 2004.  119 p.
This thesis examines various aspects of cultural immersion, how they relate to warfare, and proposes recommendations for cultural immersion supporting present day Naval Special Warfare (NSW) missions.  Special Reconnaissance is mentioned throughout the report.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA427334

Doc. call no.:  M-U 42525 J131s

Locke, Joseph W.  Back to the Future:  America’s Forgotten Lessons in Visual Reconnaissance.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, April 2007.  32 p.
"Re-introducing a simple Forward Air Control aircraft into the Theater Air Control System will significantly enhance the Air Force contribution to military success in the Global War on Terrorism."--Abstract.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 L8141b

Williams, Linda B.  Intelligence Support to Special Operations in the Global War on Terrorism.  Carlisle Barracks, PA, Army War College, March 2004.  28 p.
"Special Operations has skyrocketed, especially since the success of SOF/Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) partnership in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF).  This paper will explore the environment leading up to this change, how SOF has used and provided intelligence in the last two major conflicts, and whether that support has kept up with the demands of SOF’s new roles."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA424015
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39080-537 W7241i

Wolf, Danny R.  Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance:  The Right Question to Ask.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air War College, 2009
"This paper proposes a comprehensive ISR question for the combatant commander:  Are we effectively using joint ISR capabilities in an efficient manner to enable superior decisions leading to actionable operations?  The question must be assessed in the context of the operating environment to ensure both effective and efficient operations, leading to ultimate success."--Abstract.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43117 W853i


Periodicals

Boykin, William G. and Swanson, Scott.  'Operationalizing' Intelligence.  Special Warfare 21:23-30
"In order to provide an appropriate operational analysis and understanding, intelligence preparation of the battlefield, or IPB, and other planning mechanisms must therefore be tied to SOF operations in order to ensure that planners will have access to the best available and most usable intelligence."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1606718211&sid=3&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Cline, Lawrence E.  Special Operations and the Intelligence System.  International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence 18, no. 4:575-592 January 2005.

Deptula, David A. and Brown, Greg.  A House Divided:  The Indivisibility of Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance.  Air & Space Power Journal 22:5-15 Summer 2008.
Also available online at:  http://www.airpower.au.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj08/sum08/deptula.html

Erwin, Mike.  Integrating Intelligence with Operations.  Special Warfare 21:10-16 January-February 2008.
Intelligence support at the SF-battalion level has changed drastically over the past six years.  This article discusses those changes.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1416697161&sid=2&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Flynn, Michael T. and others.  Employing ISR:  SOF (Special Operations Forces) Best Practices.  Joint Force Quarterly No. 50:56-61 Third Quarter 2010 2008.

Matthews, William.  Soft Landing (Armed Reconnaissance Helicopter).  National Guard 63:32-35 August 2009.

Swanson, Scott and Stavridis, James G.  Know Your Enemy:  Human Intelligence Key to SOF Missions.  Special Warfare 20:16-24 January-February 2007.
To truly understand an enemy and the means necessary to obtain intelligence about such an adversary in asymmetrical and asynchronous encounters, elements of special-operations forces, or SOF, need to re-embrace the role of social/political adviser or develop additional skills and deeper cultural insights, so that they can obtain the necessary information from locals and detainees.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1221371101&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Urban Recon:  Light-Detection and Ranging Sensors Give SOF the Big Picture.  Special Warfare 19:10 January-February 2006.
"Urban-recon technology gives commanders at all levels the ability to rapidly collect and exploit high resolution, geospatial, 3-D imagery of the operational battlespace.  Utilizing two light-detection and ranging sensors, urban recon supports planning and rehearsals, planning for concealment and mobility in an urban environment, and situational awareness."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=991065361&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD


Unconventional Warfare (UW)


Internet Resources

Daniels, Herb.  Keeping COIN Simple:  The Outhouse Strategy for Security Development.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, Defense Analysis Dept. January 2009.  10 p.
Available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA495399
The Joint Special Operations Task Force – Philippines (JSOTF-P) was responsible for providing resources and manpower to assist the government of the Philippines in its fight against the Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG) and JI.  After largely routing the ASG on Basilan, the JSOTF-P moved specialized teams of American personnel to advise and assist the AFP military units assigned to the island of Jolo.  Creative and unconventional counterinsurgency (COIN) strategies were created to win the support of the local population and to sever their links to ASG.  The outhouse strategy discussed herein is indicative of the peculiarities of unconventional warfare.

Garder, Lenore K.  Irregular Warfare:  A Selected Bibliography.  Carlisle Barracks, PA, Army War College Library, November 2009.  32 p.
Available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA511435

Irregular Warfare.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Muir S. Fairchild Research Information Center, May 2010.  25 p.
Bibliography by Fairchild Center offers additional information on Irregular Warfare and Unconventional Warfare.
Available online at:  http://www.au.af.mil/au/aul/bibs/irregular2010.htm

Jones, D.  Ending the Debate:  Unconventional Warfare, Foreign Internal Defense, and Why Words Matter.  Leavenworth, KS, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, June 2006.  208 p.
Available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA451259
"There is an ongoing debate within the Special Forces community whether unconventional warfare and foreign internal defense are applicable in the contemporary and future Special Operations environments, based on current doctrinal definitions and operational concepts."--Abstract.

Lowther, Adam B.  Americans and Asymmetric Conflict:  Lebanon, Somalia, and Afghanistan.  Westport, CT, Praeger Security International Online, 2007.
Available online at:  http://psi.praeger.com/doc.aspx?d=/books/gpg/C9635/C9635-47.xml
"Provides an understanding of the relationship between classical military theory and modern asymmetric conflict, current asymmetric threats facing the U.S., and a clear set of lessons learned from recent American experiences in Lebanon (1982-1984), Somalia (1992-1994), and Afghanistan (2001-2004)."--Description.
Special Operations Forces are mentioned frequently throughout the chapters on Somalia, Afghanistan, and the concluding chapter.


Books

Alexander, John B.  Africa:  Irregular Warfare on the Dark Continent.  Hurlburt Field, FL, JSOU Press, May 2009.  81 p.
"P
rovides an assessment of the African continent with a particular focus on how Special Operations Forces (SOF) may need to operate and how the local environment impacts these operations".--p vii.  Publication provides a strategic overview and assessment of current conditions on the continent, identifies key concerns and issues, and discusses key players.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA514538
Book call no.:  355.03306 A376a

Larson, Eric V.  Assessing Irregular Warfare:  A Framework for Intelligence Analysis.  Santa Monica, CA, RAND Arroyo Center, 2008.  67 p.
"Provides an analytic framework for intelligence analysis of irregular warfare (IW) environments that could be used as the basis for a subsequent IW intelligence analysis curriculum development effort."--Abstract.  Special Operations Forces and quotes from SOF commanders are mentioned throughout the report.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA494461
Book call no.:  355.3432 A846


Documents (Student Research)

Driver, William Dave and DeFeyter, Bruce E.  The Theory of Unconventional Warfare:  Win, Lose, and Draw.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, December 2008.  95 p.
Part One discusses William McRaven’s theory of special operations and the six principles related to it which includes a concept referred to as Relative Superiority.  Part Two covers the "Theory of Unconventional Warfare" followed by three case studies which discuss Relative Superiority but in relation to six UW principles.  The case studies include the Mujahideen in Afghanistan and Hezbollah in Lebanon.
Also available online at: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA493691
Doc. call no.: M-U 42525 D782t

Farris, Stuart L.  Joint Special Operations Task Force-Philippines:  A Monograph.  Fort Leavenworth, KS, School of Advanced Military Studies, Army Command and General Staff College, 2009.  65 p.
"The Joint Special Operations Task Force-Philippines (JSOTF-P) indirect approach to irregular warfare (IW) offers senior U.S. policy makers and military commanders a suitable model worthy of consideration for conducting long-term military operations against terrorist networks inside a partner nation’s sovereign territory."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA505075
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022-2 F2461j

Gentile, Lee G.  Persistent Airpower for Unconventional Warfare:  Revamping AFCENT’s Operational Design.  Newport, RI, Naval War College, May 2009.  21 p.
"AFCENT (U.S. Air Forces Central) should adopt an unconventional operational design to provide ground forces with persistent airpower during stability operations while preparing a host nation’s air force to assume control of air defense."--Abstract.  Discusses aviation FID and mentions the 6th Special Operations Squadron (6 SOS) which is DOD’s only organization that trains foreign countries how to use airpower for UW operations.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA502979
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41662 G338p

Hartman, Scott A.  Airpower Support to Unconventional Warfare.  Fort Leavenworth, KS, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, December 2009.  84 p.
"This thesis examines the current ability of Special Operations Forces to conduct UW with air support, specifically air support provided by Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC)."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA512516
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022 H333a

Huebert, Kevin D.  The Role of Airpower in Irregular Warfare for the 21st Century.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, December 2009.  61 p.
This paper argues "that despite the capabilities of the current Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) fleet of aircraft, it lacks the capability to successfully engage in UW and COIN throughout the globe."--Abstarct.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA514119
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42525 H887r

McKenzie, James K.  Airpower Contributions to Irregular Warfare.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air War College, 2009.  30 p.
"This study focuses not only on the Air Force’s stated contributions to IW, but more the real issue of how much capacity is really required within its stated capabilities and what must be done to resolve any shortfalls.  Critical as well, is the fact that it is absolutely necessary for the Air Force to maintain a balanced force that is capable and flexible to operate within conventional as well as irregular warfare."--Abstract from web site.  SOF is mentioned.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43117 M156a

Prokopovich, Paul.  The Role of the Naval Services in Irregular Warfare.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air War College, February 2009.  58 p.
"The author suggests that the Navy utilize a model developed by the Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) to create an "IW Wing" of capabilities designed to build partnership capacity in areas such as foreign internal defense and security assistance."--Abstract.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43117 P964r


Periodicals

Burton, Janice.  Army Executive Irregular Warfare Conference Charts Army’s Path.  Special Warfare 22:16-19 November-December 2009.
Conference held August 10-14 brought together conventional and special-operations forces and members of the State Dept. and U.S. Agencies to discuss a more flexible IW strategy.  The group outlined seven needs:  a new philosophy for the way we think (approach the enemy); to become population-centric; JIIM (joint, interagency, intergovernmental and multination) networking/operations; an extended time cycle; a unifying concept to define where to invest; a framework that assesses the required realignment of resources; and a streamlined architecture for sharing common data.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1935997741&sid=2&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Burnham, John J.  Adapting the Force to the Fight:  Naval Special Warfare.  U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings 136:22-27 July 2009.
"NSW has changed since 9/1 1 in three primary ways:  the fusion of operations and intelligence (ops/intel), interagency teamwork, and a refocusing on irregular warfare.."--Article.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1899627261&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Celeski, Joseph D.  Strategic Employment of SOF in a UW Environment.  Special Warfare 21:18-25 July-August 2008.
"This article reflects many of the issues incorporated into the creation of the latest version of FM 3-05.201, Special Forces Unconventional Warfare (September 2007) and FM 3-05.130 ARSOF UW (currently in final draft)...The concept of using UW against nonstate actors (which includes violent extremists like al-Qaeda) is addressed in the classified portion of FM 3-05.201."--Editor's note.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1521037431&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Duffy, Dave.  UW Support to Irregular Warfare and the Global War on Terrorism.  Special Warfare 20:12-16 May-June 2007.
"Because of its access to many countries, based on its small footprint of 12 man teams, SF, coupled with Civil Affairs and Psychological Operations forces, can provide persistent engagement in numerous countries around the world while building surrogate-force capability and capacity during peacetime, thus shaping future operational environments and establishing additional engagement options if U.S. interests are endangered."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1295280561&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Jogerst, John D.  Preparing for Irregular Warfare.  Air & Space Power Journal 23:68-79 Winter 2009.
The latter part of this article refers to FID and special operations forces.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1949117411&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Spearin, Christopher.  Special Operations Forces a Strategic Resource:  Public and Private Divides.  Parameters 36:58-70 Winter 2006/2007.
Rebecca Ulam Weiner contends this higher private sector remuneration should not come as a surprise because the true value of labor . . . has been artificially under compensated due to the nation's monopoly on military service."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1228254781&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Ward, Robert J.  Oil Spot:  Spreading Security to Counter Insurgency.  Special Warfare 20:8-17 March-April 2007.
There are three basic types of military counterinsurgency operations:  clearing and consolidation, or C&C; disruption; and border control.  These operations are typically completed by Special Operations Forces.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1256751351&sid=2&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Witty, David M.  The Great UW Debate.  Special Warfare 9-17 March-April 2010.
Article covers 5 areas.  It reviews previous UW schools of thought.  Reviews how the original founders of SF defined UW and the confusion caused by the various definitions.  Discusses the most current beliefs about UW.  Describes the results of the UW Definition Working Group held at the U.S. Army John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School  2009 and then examines the new UW definition approved by the commanders of USSOCOM, and USASOC in June 2009.  Scroll down to the Article.
Also available online at:  http://www.soc.mil/swcs/swmag/Archives/10Mar.pdf


Naval Special Warfare Command (NAVSPECWARCOM)


Internet Resources

Naval Special Warfare Command
Available online at:  http://www.navsoc.navy.mil/
Home page of the  Naval Special Warfare Command.  Site offers access to the monthly magazine Tip of the Spear.

Navy SEALs
Available online at:  http://www.seal.navy.mil/seal/default.aspx


Book

Naval Peacekeeping and Humanitarian Operations:  Stability from the Sea, edited by James J. Wirtz and Jeffrey A. Larsen.  New York, Routledge, 2009.  190 p.
Book call no.:  359.4 N3182


Documents (Student Research)

Prokopovich, Paul.  The Role of the Naval Services in Irregular Warfare.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air War College, February 2009.  58 p.
"The author suggests that the Navy utilize a model developed by the Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) to create an "IW Wing" of capabilities designed to build partnership capacity in areas such as foreign internal defense and security assistance."--Abstract.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43117 P964r


Periodicals

Burnham, John J.  Force to the Fight:  Naval Special Warfare.  U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings 135:22-27 July 2009.

Couch, Dick.  Sheriff of Ramadi:  How American SEALs Helped Win Anbar.  Soldier of Fortune 2009.
Part One:  34:62+ January 2009.
Part Two:  34:62-68+ February 2009.
Part Three:  34:66-68+ March 2009.

Duyos, Rafael E., III.  Special Operations Need Their Own Ships.  U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings 134:72-74 November 2008.
"Charged with the responsibility for maritime special operations, the Naval Special Warfare (NSW) Command must carry out its mission using platforms that are provided on an ad hoc basis from conventional naval surface forces."--Article.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1599485191&sid=3&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Kreisher, Otto.  From the Shadows:  Heroism in Iraq, Afghanistan and Recent Piracy Rescue Shine New Light on How Navy SEALs ’Do What They Do’Sea Power 52:20-22 June 2009.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&AN=42525474&site=ehost-live

Risner, Jaden J.  Fish or Cut Bait.  United States Naval Institute Proceedings 134:38-42 September 2008.
"If the Navy is to be a full partner in special operations, it needs a dedicated organic helicopter unit."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1562493881&sid=3&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Winters, Edward G.  Adapting Across the Spectrum of Conflict:  The Role of Naval Special Warfare.  Joint Force Quarterly No. 56:76-79 First Quarter 2010.
The U.S. Naval Special Warfare (NSW) Command of the U.S. Special Operations Command has changed to move faster and more precisely against this new enemy.  There are no longer operations and intelligence; instead, we face intelligence-operations or operations-intelligence."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA515140


U.S. Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC)


Internet Resources

Air Force Factsheet:  U.S. Air Force Special Operations School
Available online at:  http://www.af.mil/information/factsheets/factsheet.asp?fsID=156

United States.  Department of the Air Force.  Air Force Doctrine Document 2-7:  Special Operations.  December 16, 2005.
Available online at:  http://www.e-publishing.af.mil/shared/media/epubs/AFDD2-7.pdf
Establishes U.S. Air Force doctrinal guidance for Special Operations.

USAF Special Operations Command
Available online at:  http://www.afsoc.af.mil/
Home page of the USAF Special Operations Command.


Internet Resource (Student Research)

Burtschi, Thomas F.  Future Implications for AFSOC and the USAF.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, April 2006.  31 p.
Available online at:  https://www.afresearch.org/
The importance of AFSOC has increased while the relevance of the Big Blue AF has decreased.  Challenges stemming from an organizational structure falling under both the AF and USSOCOM have led AFSOC to grow increasingly independent in leadership, doctrine and thought, procurement, culture and strategic importance.


Books

Lambeth, Benjamin S.  Air Power Against Terror:  America’s Conduct of Operation Enduring Freedom.  Santa Monica, CA, RAND Corp, 2005.  411 p.
"This book assesses the planning and initial execution of Operation Enduring Freedom, the first U.S. response to the terrorist attacks of September 11 against al Qaeda’s center of gravity in Afghanistan and against the Taliban theocracy that provided it safe haven.  That campaign was largely an air war enabled by U.S. and allied special forces and indigenous Afghan opposition groups".--Preface.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA449279
Book call no.:  958.1047 L221a

Pushies, Fred J.  Deadly Blue:  Battle Stories of the U.S. Air Force Special Operations Command .  New York, NY, American Management Assoc, 2009.  238 p.
"Deadly Blue is a look into the often covert world of the U.S. Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSCOC).  It is a collection of battlefield experiences of today’s air commandos.  A first-hand account of the missions, equipment and people fighting the War on Terror from the air and on the ground.  The story of any military operation revolves not just around strategies and equipment, but around people."--Preface.
Book call no.:  958.1047 P987d

United States.  Department of the Air Force.  Air Force Roadmap:  2006-2025.  Washington, DC, U.S. Air Force, 2006.  159 p.
Specialized Air Power:  Key to Irregular Operations and the War on Terror, pp 106-128.  Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC)and Air Combat Command provide Air Force specialized airpower.  This chapter provides information on AFSOC strike capabilities and modernization plan, SOF ISR and mobility operations.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA471948
Book call no.:  358.4130973 U58a


Documents (Student Research)

Powell, Robert R.  Quenching the Phoenix:  Air Force SOF and the Phoenix Cycle.  Maxwell AFB, AL, School of Advanced Air and Space Studies, June 2008.  95 p.
"This thesis outlines a new model, called the Posen-Rosen-Koskinas (PRK) Model to explain changes in AFSOF force structure and doctrine."--Abstract.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43998-1 P885q

Sullivan, Timothy J.  2006 QDR:  A Pathway for Air Force Special Operation’s Forces.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air Command and Staff College, 2008.  34 p.
This paper seeks to answer the question:  How could the Air Force and United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) equip Air Force Special Operations Forces to carry out the recommendations of the 2006 Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR)?
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43122 S9522q


Periodicals

Air Force Special Operations Command.  Airman 54, no. 3:14 The Book 2010.

AFSOC (Air Force Special Operations Command).  Air Force Magazine 93:96 May 2010 (USAF Almanac issue).
One page article lists the mission, structure, personnel, major units, bases, and weapons.
Also available online at:  http://www.airforce-magazine.com/MagazineArchive/Magazine Documents/2010/May 2010/0510majcoms.pdf (Scroll to page 96, slow to load)

Grub, Michael C.  Airpower in Small Wars:  Fighting Insurgents and Terrorists.  Air & Space Power Journal 22:110-111 Winter 2008.
This article offers a book review of Airpower in Small Wars which covers from Pershing's expedition in 1916 to the Israeli's occupation against Palestine in 2000.  By its nature, many small wars historical examples involved SOF.  Corum and Johnson offer the reader superb historical background for decision making in current and future irregular wars; indeed, their book serves as a useful "lessons learned" primer for Air Force leadership."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1613139111&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Phillips, Michael M.  U.S. Teams Directs Traffic on Crowded Skies.  Wall Street Journal 255:A10 January 19, 2010.
"The article reports on the efforts of U.S. Air Force special-operations team to manage the air traffic at the Toussaint Louverture International Airport in Port-au-Prince, Haiti in January 2010 to reduce chaos as airplanes used for delivering aids contend for space on one runway following an earthquake."--Abstract

Read, Robyn.  Irregular Warfare and the US Air Force:  The Way Ahead.  Air & Space Power Journal 21:42-52 Winter 2007.
"The 2007 Air Force Symposium on Counterinsurgency held at the Air War College and sponsored by Headquarters Air Force, Air Combat Command (ACC), and Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC), this venue provided a forum for discussing the use of airpower in COIN."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1395185101&sid=2&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Schanz, Marc V.  The SOF Makeover.  Air Force Magazine 93:52-55 June 2010.
"The Pentagon’s Fiscal 2011 budget proposal allocates $6.7 billion over the next five years for recapitalization and growth of Air Force special operations forces.  A large chunk will go to recapitalize the command’s air assets.  Special operations forces have experienced major growth since the 9/11 attacks, but the air component has lagged."--Article
Also available online at:  http://www.airforce-magazine.com/MagazineArchive/Pages/2010/June 2010/0610SOF.aspx

Special Operations Forces Aircraft.  Air Force Magazine 93:129-131 May 2010 (USAF Almanac Issue).
The article evaluates several special operations forces aircrafts of the U.S. Air Force which include the AC-130 Gunship, the CV-22 Osprey, and the MC-130E/H Combat Talon.
Also available online at:  http://www.airforce-magazine.com/MagazineArchive/Magazine Documents/2010/May 2010/0510weapons.pdf (Scroll to page 129, slow to load)

Wurster, Donald C.  Mastering the Art of the Possible:  The Air Force Special Operations Command.  Joint Force Quarterly No. 56:80-84 First Quarter 2010.
This story provides only one example of how AFSOC continues expanding our capabilities to provide the combatant commander with the full spectrum of specialized airpower.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1948691721&sid=1&Fmt=1&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD


U.S. Army Special Operations Command (USASOC)


Internet Resources

U.S. Army Special Operations Command
Available online at: http://www.soc.mil/hqs/hqs_home.htm
Home page: U.S. Army Special Operations Command.

O'Connell, Douglas K.  U.S. Army Special Forces and Homeland Security Operations.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, March 2009.  91 p.
Available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA479978
"This thesis examines potential homeland security missions for Special Forces.  Additionally, given the unique first-responder role of the National Guard, this thesis analyzes potential policy changes needed to enhance National Guard Special Forces contributions to homeland security.  The absence of doctrine for domestic Special Forces operations potentially adversely impacts Army National Guard Special Forces."--Abstract.


Books

Association of the United States Army.  U.S. Army Special Operations Forces:  Integral to the Army and the Joint Force.  Arlington, VA, Institute of Land Warfare, Association of the United States Army, March 2010.  23 p.
This latest installment of AUSA’s signature Torchbearer series discusses how Army special operations forces, teamed with general purpose forces, achieve strategic effects through tactical- and operational-level excellence on the battlefield and in lesser-known areas around the world."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://www.ausa.org/publications/ilw/ILWTorchbearernationalsecurityreports/Documents/TB_SpecialOperationsForces022010.pdf
Book call no.:  356.1670973 U582


Documents (Student Research)

Hedman, Daniel K.  Reorganizing SOF for Irregular Warfare.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, December 2008.  39 p.
U.S Army Special Operations is mentioned throughout this report.  "This thesis explores how a reorganization of USSOCOM in order to create an IW organization would fill capability gaps created by having 80% of USSOCOMs forces dedicated to Iraq and Afghanistan.  This thesis identifies factors that need to be considered when creating an IW organization such as regional orientation and interagency capabilities".--Abstract.  Two possibilities for the framework of an IW organization are outlined with a proposed recommendation.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA493818
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42525 H455r

Robertson, Christopher H.  Support of U.S. Army Special Forces in Expeditionary Warfare:  A Monograph.  Fort Leavenworth, KS, School of Advanced Military Studies, Army Command and General Staff College, 2008.  49 p.
"The purpose of this monograph is to explore the relationship between the emerging U.S. Army doctrinal concept of expeditionary warfare and logistical support of U.S. Army Special Forces."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA494092
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022-2 R649s


Periodicals

Croot, Edward C.  Digging Deeper:  Cultural Understanding Requires ARSOF to Go Beyond Surface Understanding.  Special Warfare 20:26-29 March-April 2007.
Argues that for SOF soldiers one of the most critical lessons is the importance of understanding and embracing the culture of the area where they will be operating.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1256751371&sid=2&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Finlayson, Kenneth.  A Collective Effort:  Army Special Operations Forces in Deh Rawod, Afghanistan.  Veritas 5, no. 4:43-55 2009.

Lightsey, Ross F.  Civil Affairs Support to the Surge.  Special Warfare 21:16-23 March-April 2008.
The Civil Affairs forces from the U.S. Army Special Operations Command operate successfully with conventional forces in Iraq and provide numerous nonlethal options to an otherwise lethal operation.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1451838051&sid=4&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Grdovic, Mark.  Understanding Unconventional Warfare and U.S. Army Special Forces.  Special Warfare 19:14-24 September-October 2006.
Discussed is the understanding and acceptance of UW as part of a spectrum of operational capabilities.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1162459711&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Mulholland, John F., Jr.  Army Special Operations:  Setting the World Standard.  Army 59:153-156 October 2009.
As we prepare to celebrate our 20th year of service to our Army and nation - one-third of that time spent at war - the men and women of U.S. Army Special Operations Command (USASOC) continue to make great contributions worldwide.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1881026271&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Mulholland, John F., Jr.  Countering Irregular Threats:  The Army Special Operations Contribution.  Joint Force Quarterly No. 56:71-75 First Quarter 2010.
Lieutenant General John F. Mulholland, Jr., USA, is Commander, U.S. Army Special Operations Command.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1948691701&sid=1&Fmt=1&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Naylor, Sean D.  SF Command to Form 5 Special Troops BattalionsArmy Times 70, no. 29:18-19 February 01, 2010.
"Special Forces Command is drastically changing its plan to add a fourth battalion of A-teams to each of the five active Special Forces groups and will now convert all five of those battalions to "special troops battalions" by 2015."--Article.

Wagner, Robert W.  USASOC:  Resolute and Ready.  Army 58:169-172 October 2008.
"USASOC forces are heavily engaged in supporting Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF)."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1581574211&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD


U.S. Marine Corps Special Operations Capable & Special Mission Units


Internet Resource

Marine Corp Forces Special Operations Command
Available online at:  http://www.marines.mil/unit/marsoc/Pages/default.aspx
Home page:  Marine Corp Forces Special Operations Command.


Documents (Student Research)

George, Joseph E.  Aviation Support to U.S. Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air War College, February 2007.  34 p.
Also available online at:  https://research.au.af.mil/papers/ay2007/awc/George.pdf
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43117 G348a

Mykleby, Mark G.  The United States Marine Corps:  The 911 Force in the Post-9/11 World.  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air War College, February 2007.  83 p.
This paper challenges the relevancy of the Marine Corps’s current Title 10, United States Code, roles and missions showing that this tasking is rooted in the pre-World War Two security environment and has little application to the 21st Century security environment.   It examines today’s threat environment and contends that the Marine Corps is the service best suited to address the largely irregular threats of today.  Recommendations are offered on how the Marine Corps can better organize, train, and equip.  SOF is mentioned.
Also available online at:  https://research.au.af.mil/papers/ay2007/awc/Mykleby.pdf
Doc. call no.:  M-U 43117 M9961u


Periodicals

Crabb, Andrew L.  Irregular Amphibious Warfare.  Marine Corps Gazette 93:78-83 November 2009.
"The Corps and USSOCom need to negotiate the status of MarSOF.  In the process, a concept for conducting IW, in support of amphibious operations in the littorals, should also be agreed upon.  This would provide a much-needed update to Joint Publication 3-02 (JP 3-02), Joint Doctrine for Amphibious Operations.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1900812661&sid=1&Fmt=4&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Hilburn, Matt.  Marine Special Ops.  Sea Power 50:70-74 April 2007.
An interview with Major General Dennis J. Hejlik of the U.S. Marine Corps Forces Special Operation Command (MARSOC).
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&AN=24877534&site=ehost-live

Magnuson, Stew.  Dual Identity.  National Defense 93:45-47 February 2009.
The article reports on the establishment of the U.S. Marine Corps Special Operations Command (MARSOC) in February 2006 as part of the anti-terrorism efforts of the government.  It details the controversy surrounding the establishment of MARSOC.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mth&AN=36448375&site=ehost-live

Robeson, Mastin M.  Forging Marine Special Operators.  Joint Force Quarterly No. 56:85-89 First Quarter 2010.
Major General Mastin M. Robeson, USMC, is Commander, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1948691731&sid=1&Fmt=1&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD


U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM)


Internet Resources

McKaughan, Jeff.  Q&A:  Lieutenant General David P. FridovichSpecial Operations Technology June 2010.
Available online at:  http://www.special-operations-technology.com/sotech-archives/253-sotech-2010-volume-8-issue-4-june/2992-qaa-lieutenant-general-david-p-fridovich.pdf
Interview with Lieutenant General Fridovich who is the Director for the Center for Special Operations at the United States Special Operations Command.

Olson, Eric T.  Fiscal 2010 Defense Budget:  Special Operations.  FDCH Congressional Testimony June 04, 2009.
Available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&AN=32Y2017428336&site=ehost-live
Eric T. Olson, Commander U.S. Special Operations Command, reports to Congress on the state of the United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM).

U.S. Special Operations Command
Available online at:  http://www.socom.mil/SOCOMHome/Pages/default.aspx
Home page of the U.S. Special Operations Command offers information on current operations, news, links to the command history, posture statement, and publications.


Internet Resource (Student Research)

Boyden, Andrew and others.  JSOU Scoring the Long War.  Hurlburt Field, FL, Joint Special Operations University, April 2009.
Available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA495400


Books

Ervine, Quintin V.  Special Operations Forces.  New York, Nova Science, 2009.  239 p.
This book presents materials concerning the Special Forces which have become an important strike force part due to the changing face of military challenges.
Book call no.:  356.160973 E73s

Joint Special Operations University.  2007 JSOU and NDIA SO/LIC Division Essays.  Hurlburt Field, FL, JSOU Press, 2007.  113 p.
These essays provide insights on what Joint Special Operations University (JSOU) and the Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict (SO/LIC) Division students see as priority national security issues today affecting special operations.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA495377
Book call no.:  359.984 T974 2007

JSOU Second Annual Symposium Irregular Warfare:  Strategic Utility of SOF; 30 April - 3 May 2007 Hurlburt Field, Florida.  Hurlburt Field, FL, JSOU Press, 2007.  24 p.
The symposium was framed by three keynote speakers, addressing the validity of IW as a model, experiences in the interagency process, and perspectives on SOF in the global security environment out to 2015.  Three panels provided the substance and framework for the discussions and some thoughts for a way ahead.  The panels were followed by successful breakout groups for more detailed discussion and input.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA511947
Book call no.:  355.46 e96 1007

Newton, Richard D.  Contemporary Security Challenges:  Irregular Warfare and Indirect Approaches.  Hurlbert Field, FL, JSOU Press, February 2009.  93 p.
Also available online at:  http://jsoupublic.socom.mil/publications/jsou/JSOU09-3IndApp.pdf
Book call no.:  355.0218 C761

Pushies, Fred J.  The Complete Book of U.S. Special Operations Forces.  St. Paul, MN, MBI Publishing Co., 2004.  176 p.
Provides an overview of the United States Special Forces, including their history, weapons, and vehicles.
Book call no.:  356.160973 P987c

United States.  Congress.  House of Representatives.  Committee on Armed Services.  Assessing U.S. Special Operations Command's Missions and Roles.   Hearing.  109th Congress, 2nd session, June 29, 2008.  Washington, GPO, 2008.  51 p.
Book call no.:  356.160973 U581a

United States.  Congress.  Senate.  Committee on Armed Services.  Department of Defense Authorization for Appropriations for Fiscal Year 2009.  Washington, DC, G.P.O.  March 2008.  340-393 p.
Posture statement of Adm Eric T. Olson, USN, Commander, United States Special Operations Command.
Book call no.:  353.6 U587dh 2009 pt. 1

United States.  Department of Defense.  Quadrennial Roles and Missions Review Report.  Washington, DC, Department of Defense, 2009.  39 p.
Part III, D -- Functions of the Services and the U.S. Special Operations Command.
Also available online at:  http://purl.access.gpo.gov/GPO/LPS108437
Book call no.:  355.033573 U582qb

U.S. Special Operations Command.  Capstone Concept for Special Operations.  MacDill Air Force Base, FL, Center for Knowledge & Futures, U.S. Special Operations Command , 2006.  22 p.
"The capstone concept for special operations is our overarching depiction of how the special operations community will support national strategic and military objectives beyond the Future Years Defense Plan" -- Commander’s foreword.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA458268
Book call no.:  356.1670973 C254

U.S. Special Operations Command.  United States Special Operations Command History.  MacDill AFB, FL, HQ USSOCOM History and Research Office, 2007.  142 p.
Also available online at:  http://www.socom.mil/SOCOMHome/Documents/history6thedition.pdf
Book call no.:  356.160973 U59 2007 c. 2


Document (Student Research)

Hedman, Daniel K.  Reorganizing SOF for Irregular Warfare.  Monterey, CA, Naval Postgraduate School, December 2008.  39 p.
"Explores how a reorganization of USSOCOM in order to create an IW organization would fill capability gaps created by having 80% of USSOCOMs forces dedicated to Iraq and Afghanistan.  This thesis identifies factors to consider when creating an IW organization.--Abstract.  Two possibilities for the framework of an IW organization are outlined with a proposed recommendation.  USSOCOM and U.S Army Special Operations are mentioned throughout the report.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA493818
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42525 H455r


Periodicals

Gurney, David H and Smotherman, Jeffrey D.  An Interview with Eric T. Olson.  Joint Force Quarterly No. 56:60-63 First Quarter 2010.
Admiral Eric T. Olson, USN, is Commander, U.S. Special Operations Command.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1948691681&sid=1&Fmt=1&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Olson, Eric T.  The Posture of US Special Forces.  Military Technology 33, Special Issue:6-11 2009 ('Special Forces" issue).
Eric T. Olson, Commander U.S. Special Operations Command, discusses the command and its missions.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=37247141&site=ehost-live

Olson, Eric.  U.S. Special Operations:  Context and Capabilities in Irregular Warfare.  Joint Force Quarterly No. 56:64-70 First Quarter 2010.
Admiral Eric T. Olson, USN, is Commander, U.S. Special Operations Command.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1948691691&sid=1&Fmt=1&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD


History


Internet Resources

AFSOC Heritage:  Heritage of the Special Operations Professionals
Available online at:  http://www.afsoc.af.mil/library/afsocheritage/

AFSOC Heritage Reading Room
Available online at:  http://www.afsoc.af.mil/library/afsocheritage/afsocheritagereadingroom.asp

The AFSOC Heritage Reading Room contains various reference materials pertaining to special operations and search and rescue missions.  Users should be advised that many of these documents are large in file size and download time will vary accordingly.

HQ USASOC Special Operations Forces Information
Available online at:  http://www.soc.mil/sofinfo/story.html
The Story of Army Special Operations.

Special Operations (1997).  Maxwell AFB, AL, Air University Library, September 1997.
Available online at:  http://www.au.af.mil/au/aul/bibs/special/sof97toc.htm
Older bibliography offers information in separate sections for SOF operations in -- World War II, Falklands War, Grenada (Operation Urgent Fury), Desert Storm, and Haiti (Operation Uphold/Restore Democracy).

Special Operations 2006: History
Available online at:  http://www.au.af.mil/au/aul/bibs/specops.htm#hist
Older bibliography compiled by Muir S. Fairchild Research Information Center with a general section on SOF history.

The U.S. Army Center of Military History
Available online at:  http://www.history.army.mil/search.html
The Center Of Military History (CMH), which reports to the Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Army, is responsible for the appropriate use of history throughout the United States Army.  In the search box type in a Keyword - i.e. Special operations.


Books

Darlow, Steve.  Special OP:  Bomber:  Daring Missions That Changed the Shape of WWII.  Cincinnati, OH, David & Charles, 2008.  286 p.
Book call no.:  940.54420941 D221s

Edwards, Paul M.  Combat Operations of the Korean War:  Ground, Air, Sea, Special and Covert.  Jefferson, NC, McFarland & Co, 2010.  189 p.
"This reference work provides information on all known military operations carried out under United Nations command as part of the Korean War.  Entries are arranged alphabetically by operation name and are divided into five sections:  primarily ground operations, primarily air operations, primarily sea operations, special operations, and covert and clandestine operations"--Provided by publisher.
Book call no.:  959.504 N149L

McKinney, Mike and Ryan, Mike.  Chariots of the Damned:  Helicopter Special Operations from Vietnam to Kosovo.  New York, Thomas Dunne Books, 2001.  215 p.
Investigates the origins of the Special Operations Group and describes the experiences of rescue missions in Vietnam; Desert 1, the Gulf War, Bosnia, and Somalia.
Book call no.:  356.16 M158c

Moyar, Mark.  A Question of Command:  Counterinsurgency from the Civil War to Iraq.  New Haven, CT, Yale University Press, 2009.  347 p.
Book call no.:  355.0218 M938q

Pegler, Martin.  Sniper:  A History of the US Marksman, foreword by Chuck Mawhinney.  New York, Osprey Publishing, 2007.  280 p.
"This book gives an in-depth study of the development of the rifle and the parallel emergence of the American rifleman, sharpshooter, and sniper.  Beginning his story with the earliest firearms introduced in the 15th century, and using contemporary accounts and photographs, Pegler traces the marksman’s evolution throughout the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, and the conflicts of the 20th and 21st centuries."--Book Jacket.
Book call no.:  356.162 P376s

Weir, William.  Guerrilla Warfare:  Irregular Warfare in the Twentieth Century.  Mechanicsburg, PA, Stackpole Books, 2008.  241 p.
Offers chapters on various guerrilla wars from the Boer War in 1899 to the Afghan-Soviet War 1979-1989.  Several of these wars involved commando and SOF forces..
Book call no.:  355.02180904 W425g


Periodicals

Briscoe, Charles H.  Born of Desperation:  Early Special Operations in the Korean War.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 6, no. 1:14-22 2010.

Briscoe, Charles H.  1st L&L in Korea, a Photographer's Record, 1952-53.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 4:14-25 2007.

Briscoe, Charles H.  El Paraiso and the War in El Salvador:  Part 1 (1981-1983).  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 1:12-23 2007.

Briscoe, Charles H.  Major Herbert R. Brucker SF Pioneer Part III:  SOE Training & "Team HERMIT" into France.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 1:72-87 2007.

Briscoe, Charles H.  Major Herbert R. Brucker SF Pioneer:  Part IV:  SO Team HERMIT in France.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 2:72-87 2007.

Briscoe, Charles H.  San Miguel:  The Attack on El Bosque.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 3:1-22 2007.

Finlayson, Kenneth.  "Colonel Mike" The Origins of Mike Force in Vietnam.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 5, no.2:19-27 2009.

Finlayson, Kenneth.  Key West:  Home of ARSOF Underwater Operations.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 1:3-9 2007.

Finlayson, Kenneth.  The Lords of Darkness.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 4:52-61 2007.

Finlayson, Kenneth.  Not Just Doing Logistics:  LTF 530 in Support of TF Dagger.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 2:45-52 2007.

Finlayson, Kenneth.  Operation Baaz Tsuka:  Task Force 31 Returns to the Panjwayi.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 4, no. 1:14-25 2008.

Finlayson, Kenneth.  Operation Cottage:  First Special Service Force, Kiska Campaign.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 4, no. 2:30-43 2008.

Finlayson, Kenneth.  A Tale of Two Units:  The 129th Assault Helicopter Company.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 1:66-71 2007.

Finlayson, Kenneth.  Wolfpacks and Donkeys:  Special Forces Soldiers in the Korean War.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 3:31-40 2007.

Finlayson, Kenneth and others.  Rangers in World War II:  Part II, Sicily and Italy. Supplying the Resistance:  OSS Logistics Support to Special Operations in Europe.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 1:49-58 2007.

Finlayson, Kenneth and Meyer, Alan D.  Operation MEDUSA:  Regaining Control of Afghanistan's Panjwayi Valley.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 4:1-13 2007.

Jones, Robert W.  The Ganders:  1st Radio Broadcasting and Leaflet Group Conducts PSYWAR in Korea - Part II.  Veritas:  Journal of Special Operations History 3, no. 3:41-58 2007.

Jones, Robert W.  The Ganders:  Strategic PSYWAR in the Far East Part I:  Introduction and Movement to the Far East.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 1:59-65 2007.

Jones, Robert W.  Resurrected Again:  95th Civil Affairs Brigade (Airborne).  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 1:10-11 2007.

Jones, Robert W.  A Team Effort:  Special Forces in Vietnam June-December 1964.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 1:24-36 2007.

Jones, Robert W.  A Team Effort:  The Montagnard Uprising of September 1964.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 2:53-67 2007.

King, Anthony.  The Special Air Service and the Concentration of Military Power.  Armed Forces & Society 35:646-666 July 2009.

Knapp, David G.  OSS Detachment 404 and Operations in Southeast Asia.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 2:38-44 2007.

Marion, Forrest L.  Air Force Combat Controllers at Desert One:  April 24-25, 1980.  Air Power History 56:46-55 Spring 2009.

Palumbo, Raymond P.  Army Special Operations Aviation:  The Legacy of a Disaster.  Army 60:39-41 January 2010.

Piasecki, Eugene G.  If You Liked Beirut, You'll Love Mogadishu:  An Introduction to ARSOF in Somalia.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 2:17-27 2007.

Piasecki, Eugene G.  The Knollwood Maneuver:  The Ultimate Airborne Test.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 4, no. 1:54-63 2008.

Sacquety, Troy J.  The 151st Airborne Tank Company at Camp Mackall, NC.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 3:23-30 2007.

Sacquety, Troy J.  Allied Long Range Penetration Groups for Burma:  The Chindits, the Marauders, and the MARS Task Force.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 4, no. 1:26-29 2008.

Sacquety, Troy J.  The CG-4A Waco Glider.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 2:35-37 2007.

Sacquety, Troy J.  The OSS:  A Primer on the Special Operations Branches and Detachments of the Office of Strategic Services.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 4:34-51 2007.

Sacquety, Troy J.  A Special Forces Model:  OSS Detachment 101 in the Myitkyina Campaign:  Part I.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 4, no. 1:30-47 2008.

Sacquety, Troy J.  The Special Forces Patch:  History and Origins.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 3:59-62 2007.

Sacquety, Troy J.  Supplying the Resistance:  OSS Logistics Support to Special Operations in Europe.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 1:37-48 2007.

Sacquety, Troy J.  We Badly Needed Something to Do:  Glider Jumping at Camp Mackall, 1943.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 3, no. 2:28-31+ 2007.

Sacquety, Troy J.  Wings over Burma:  Air Support in the Burma Campaign.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 4, no. 2:16-29 2008.

Siler, Stetson M.  Operation Just Cause:  An Air Power Perspective.  Air Power History 55:34-45 Winter 2008.
SOF involvement in the operation is mentioned throughout the article.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1648103671&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Yarborough, William P.  A Historical View of the Psychological Role of Special Forces.  Special Warfare 20:12-14 September-October 2007.
"This article was written in 1972 and was published in DA Pamphlet 525-7-2, The Art and Science of Psychological Operations:  Case Studies of Military Application in 1976.  Yarborough, who died in 2005, is credited as being one of the founders of Special Forces."--Editor's note.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1345215011&sid=9&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD


Programs/Systems, Training & Equipment


Internet Resource

Special Operations Technology.
Available online at 
http://www.special-operations-technology.com/sotech-home.html
Website offers an online monthly magazine titled "Special Operations Technology" with archives back to February 2006.  Access limited to .mil on-base.


Books

Dockery, Kevin.  Weapons of the Navy SEALs.  New York, Berkley Books, 2004.  538 p.
Book call no.:  359.984 D637w

Dockery, Kevin Abbrecht E.  Special Forces in Action:  Missions, Ops, Weapons, and Combat - Day by Day.  New York, Kensington Publishing Corp, 2004.  339 p.
Book call no.:  356.160973 D637s

Drew, John G.  Unmanned Aerial Vehicle:  End-to-End Support Considerations.  Santa Monica, CA, Rand, 2005.  112 p.
"The authors examine current support postures for UAV systems, such as Global Hawk and Predator.  Through this examination, it became clear that there is a gap between traditional methods of determining logistics requirements and rapid acquisition processes.  A balance needs to be struck between providing a new capability rapidly and the effects of that on long-term support of that capability."--Abstract.
Book call no.:  623.7469 U58


Documents (Student Research)

Cannady, Bryan H.  Special Operations Joint Professional Military Education Transformation.  Fort Leavenworth, KS, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, 2008.  90 p.
"As a primary player in the future operational environment and the required total joint force integration, special operations must take a leading role in professional military education (PME), yet the current architecture of JPME does not facilitate or include this required SOF integration."--Abstract.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA482944
Doc. call no.:  M-U 39080-537 G8782d

Carty, William J.  Planning and Training Considerations for Emerging Trends in Special Operations and General Purpose Force Operational Integration.  Newport, RI, Naval War College, 2004.  20 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA422764
Doc. call no.:  M-U 41662 C329p

Hester, Johnny L.  Integration of Special Operations Forces into the Joint Targeting Process.  Fort Leavenworth, KS, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, 2003.  84 p.
Also available online at:  http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA416890
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022 H5881i

Powell, Matthew A.  Keeping the Dagger Sharp:  A Comparison of MC-130H and MH-47E Selection and Training Methods.  Fort Leavenworth, KS, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, 2005.  74p.
Doc. call no.:  M-U 42022 P885k


Periodicals

Ames, Ben.  Special Forces Demand Smaller, Lighter Electronics.  Military & Aerospace Electronics 17:30-35 February 2006.
Focuses on the demand for lower size, weight, and power electronic devices by U.S. special operations forces.  Since this military unit operates in small group, they demand for different military equipments and solutions, like cutting-edge, smaller and lighter night-vision goggle, handheld radios, and batteries.  These devices should perform in far more demanding conditions than conventional military gear.
Also available online at:  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=19806520

Burton, Janice.  Army Approves New SF Warrant Officer Training.  Special Warfare 19:14-15 January-February 2006.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=991065401&sid=2&Fmt=4&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Burton, Janice.  ARSOFU:  Keeping the Force Connected.  Special Warfare 21:30-31 July-August 2008.
The podcasts vary in content from informational (an outline of the new Reserve Civil Affairs pipeline) to doctrinal (clips from the information-warfare lecture series sponsored by the U.S. Army Special Operations Command).  By harnessing this technology, SWCS has changed the face of special-operations training, allowing Soldiers to spend time not deployed at their home station rather than on temporary-duty status for advanced schooling.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1521037361&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Burton, Janice.  Language Transformation Plan to Build Culturally Savvy Soldiers.  Special Warfare 18:14-17 September 2005.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=913086901&sid=2&Fmt=4&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Burton, Janice.  Pipeline Transformation:  SFQC Phase III Ties Technology, Language to MOS Training.  Special Warfare 18:20-23 November-December 2005.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=958996231&sid=1&Fmt=4&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Burton, Janice.  Transforming Robin Sage:  Exercise to Incorporate TTPs, Language and Culture Scenarios, Shorter Schedule.  Special Warfare 19:11-13 January-February 2006.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=991065081&sid=2&Fmt=4&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Cotty, Will and others.  The Whole-Man Concept:  Assessing the SF (Special Forces) Soldier of the FutureSpecial Warfare 17:18-21 April 2005.
"The US Army John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School (SWCS), the proponent for Special Forces training, has begun a transformation that will not only allow soldiers to complete training in more efficient manner but will also implement changes in the training program in response from the current battle space.  Discusses the whole-man concept that the SWCS is using to redesign assessment techniques and procedures in transforming Special Forces Assessment and Selection."
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=868905681&sid=1&Fmt=4&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Finlayson, Kenneth.  Evolution of ARSOF Communications.  Veritas:  Journal of Army Special Operations History 4, no. 1:48-54 2008.

Finlayson, Kenneth.  Night Stalkers in the Philippines:  Tragedy and Triumph in Balikatan 02-1.  Veritas 2, nos.1-2:54-59 2006.

Fitchitt, David and Burton, Janice.  Going South:  SF Underwater Operations Training Facility Tackles Pre-CDQC.  Special Warfare 18:28-31 November-December 2005.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=958996241&sid=3&Fmt=4&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

George, Dean.  FBCB2 Gives Soldiers Better Picture of Battlespace.  Special Warfare 18:29 September 2005.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=913087051&sid=2&Fmt=4&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Scutro, Andrew.  Spec Ops Have New Home at Sea.  Navy Times 55:16 February 13, 2006.
Focuses on the efforts of the U.S. Navy to convert several ballistic-missile submarines into special operations vehicles as of February 2006.  The first of the submarines to be converted is the Ohio, which was modified to launch Navy Sea, Air and Land operatives in miniature submarines as well as a number of Tomahawk missiles.

Wendt, Eric P.  Strategic Counterinsurgency Modeling.  Special Warfare 18:2-13 September 2005.
Also available online at:  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=913087021&sid=2&Fmt=4&clientId=417&RQT=309&VName=PQD


This page was last updated on 03/05/2014 09:52 AM

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