PREFACE


Modern combat is complex and demanding. To fight and win, we must train our soldiers during peacetime to successfully execute their wartime missions. We must use every training opportunity to improve soldier, leader, and unit task performance. To improve their individual and collective-task performances to meet or exceed the Army standard, soldiers and leaders must know and understand what happened or did not happen during every training event.

After-action reviews (AARs) help provide soldiers and units feedback on mission and task performances in training and in combat. After-action reviews identify how to correct deficiencies, sustain strengths, and focus on performance of specific mission essential tasks list (METL) training objectives.

This training circular (TC) is a leader's guide on how to plan, prepare, and conduct an AAR. It supplements and expands the guidance in Field Manual (FM) 25-101. Competent leaders must understand and apply the techniques and procedures which produce good AARs.

Key is the spirit in which AARs are given. The environment and climate surrounding an AAR must be one in which the soldiers and leaders openly and honestly discuss what actually transpired in sufficient detail and clarity that not only will everyone understand what did and did not occur and why, but most importantly will have a strong desire to seek the opportunity to practice the task again.

The U.S. Army Combined Arms Command is the proponent for this publication. Send comments or suggestions to the Deputy Commanding General for Training, Combined Arms Command, ATTN ATZL-CTT, Fort Leavenworth, KS 66027-7000.

Unless this publication states otherwise, masculine nouns and pronouns refer to both men and women.



Chapter 1: The After-Action Review