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Knowing: Developing Knowing

Key Topics

Developing the Concept of Knowing

In today's non-linear, dynamic, complex world, warfare can no longer rely on the logic of the past to win future engagements. As we move away from predictable warfare patterns susceptible to logic, our leaders are increasingly reliant on their "gut" instinct, an internal sense of "knowing." To prepare ourselves to understand current situational assessments and potential enemy threats, it is essential that we learn to identify, interpret, make decisions, and take appropriate action to counter these new threats utilizing this sense of "knowing."

The Concept of Knowing presented here focuses on the cognitive capabilities of observing and perceiving a situation, the cognitive processing that must occur to understand the external world and make maximum use of our internal thinking capabilities, and the mechanism for creating deep knowledge and acting on that knowledge, the Self as an Agent of Change. Taken together, the five observables, four processes and ten elements discussed represent the factors that can create deep knowledge, understanding and effective actions, all necessary to obtain the real benefits of "knowing." It is this integrated capability built-up over time through learning, awareness, and constant self-change, that creates the power of knowing, so important in the new warfighting environment.

Developing the concept of knowing

There are three general categories of "Knowing 2000." The Concept of Knowing will focus on the cognitive capabilities of observing and perceiving a situation, the cognitive processing that must occur to understand the external world and make maximum use of our internal thinking capabilities, and the mechanism for creating deep knowledge and acting on that knowledge, the Self as an Agent of Change. These three categories are visualized by cogs, a comfortable 20th century concept which can aid in understanding 21st century thinking.

Knowing improves your ability to developreal discernment, greater associations, wise insight and better decision making

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The Benefits of Knowing

Taken together, the five observables, four processes and ten elements of Self as an Agent of Change, represent the factors that can create deep knowledge, understanding and effective actions, all necessary to obtain the real benefits of "knowing." Each of these factors is related to many of the others, and hence it is the integrated capability built-up over time through learning, awareness and constant self-change that creates the power of knowing so important in the new warfighting environment.

Some of the benefits of this power of knowing are:

The level of benefit for each individual is dependent on current capability and processing sets, and the intensity of thinking and practice toward improving those sets. The level of benefit to the organization -- and the government in general -- is additive, and dependent on both individual progress and the sharing of that progress across organizational and functional lines.

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Proceed to "Knowing: Cognitive Capabilities"